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Friday, March 25, 2011RSS Feed

Defining Ourselves

As the Texas Physical Therapy Association continues to generate media coverage of a bill that would allow direct access to physical therapists, we know that many of our colleagues are fighting similar battles at the state level across the country. All too often, other professions attempt to inaccurately or inappropriately define our profession through legislative and regulatory efforts. Ironically, these same health care providers are often in a position to determine whether a patient "needs" physical therapy.

Last week, APTA introduced a new publication titled "Today's Physical Therapist: A Comprehensive Review of a 21st Century Health Care Profession" that we hope will assist our chapters and sections in proactively educating policymakers, payers, prospective students and the public about the physical therapy profession - before other professions attempt to define us.

The new publication pulls together various subject matters and issues about the physical therapy profession: from licensure and specialization to education and research, to the role of the PTA and payment for physical therapist services. This new publication provides readers with a 'one-stop' location to learn in depth about where we are as a profession, and where we are going in the 21st century.

Please let us know what you think of the publication. Are there other tools you would find helpful for your outreach efforts?

  • Posted by R Scott Ward at 12:51 PM
  • Labels: Advocacy

Comments

A comment was removed because it violated the site terms and conditions. http://www.apta.org/TermsConditions/ Although APTA welcomes constructive criticism, personal attacks on any individuals will not be tolerated.
Posted by APTA Site Administrator on 3/25/2011 1:38 PM
Briefly reviewed the work this morning and it looks like an in depth review of the profession. It's well written, and should illuminate the profession to those from within and without. Many therapists are practicing contentedly without direct referral or imaging studies, and see no need. Many are practicing proficiently and competently with BS, MSPT, MScPT, DPT, and a host of other delineations. Each has it's merits, and nobody is required to do anything different from what they have been. I would hate to see the profession go the way of examining an imaging study to "see where the pain is coming from", or to "diagnose" a musculoskeletal pain. Imaging studies are nothing more than another tool, generating more information. It is the skill in utilizing the tool, in assimilating the information, that will determine whether the tool is of benefit or not. Until they can develop a pain scanner, or "pain ray" that will show you pain, and its origin, on a film.
Posted by Leon Richard -> AJSa@O on 3/28/2011 2:02 PM
HI, I THINK YOU ARE RIGHT, BUT ITS REALLY IMPORTANT PUT ATENTION ON WHOS DOIN IT, JUST A HUMBLE COMMENTARY FROM A PT OF GENERAL HOSPITAL IN GUATEMALA CENTRAL AMERICA, I WAS LOOKING FOR UPDATIN INFO AND SEE YOUR BLOG.
Posted by ERICK RENE HERNANDEZ MAZARIEGOS on 4/14/2011 2:00 PM
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