Archive: CSM 2012: Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Programming

  • This is archived programming for CSM 2012. See current programming.

    Browse Cardiovascular and Pulmonary sessions by day. Return to the main topic menu.

    Wednesday, February 8 | Thursday, February 9 | Friday, February 10 | Saturday, February 11 

    * Should you choose to preselect sessions during the registration process, please be advised that preselection is not a guarantee of a seat. Attendees are asked to preselect to better determine room size and all efforts will be made to accommodate sessions in the largest rooms possible. All attendees are encouraged to show up to sessions early. Attendees are also encouraged to select alternative sessions in the event their first choice is full. 

    Wednesday, February 8 (Preconference)

    Assessment and Treatment of the Patient With Pulmonary Dysfunction: From Critical Care to Rehabilitation

    Time: 8:00 am-5:30 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Amy Pawlik, PT, DPT, CCS, Ellen Hillegass, PT, PhD, CCS, Rebecca Crouch, PT, DPT, CCS

    Level: Multiple Level

    Preconference Pricing: Standard 

    CEUs: 0.7 (7 contact hours/CCUs)

    Pulmonary disease affects millions of Americans and contributes to increased hospital admissions, decline in functional independence, and decreased quality of life. Advancements in medical treatment of patients with both acute and chronic pulmonary disease are life-saving and improve symptoms, but also can create long-term challenges for patients. Physical therapists can improve outcomes in both inpatient and outpatient settings by performing pulmonary assessments, teaching airway clearance techniques and breathing strategies, and helping determine a patient's supplemental oxygen needs with activity. There is a growing body of literature addressing functional assessment as a means to improve outcomes and prevent recurrent hospitalizations. This course will review normal pulmonary anatomy and physiology, discuss pathophysiology and its impact on patient function, and provide a hands-on learning experience to aid the PT in pulmonary and functional assessment and intervention for patients with pulmonary disease.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Describe the anatomy and physiology of the respiratory system.
    • Analyze the pathophysiology of obstructive and restrictive pulmonary disorders.
    • Discuss the PT's role and techniques available to assess and treat patients with pulmonary disease, including the use of outcome measurement tools.
    • Demonstrate lung auscultation techniques and titrate supplemental oxygen.
    • Perform a 6-minute walk test, Short Physical Performance Battery, and other outcomes measurement tools.
    • Apply effective breathing techniques to increase airway clearance and activity tolerance.
    • 'Explore the issues regarding reimbursement associated with physical therapists and pulmonary rehabilitation.

    Thursday, February 9

    Inflammation, Atherosclerosis, Neurodegeneration, and Cancer

    Time: 8:00 am-10:00 am (See Program for Room)

    Speaker: Brad Stockert, PT, PhD

    Level: Multiple Level

    Inflammation is now known to play a significant role in the development and propagation of atherosclerosis, some neurodegenerative disorders, and some forms of cancer. The presence of chronic inflammation is now considered to be a stronger predictor of cardiovascular disease than low-density lipoprotein cholesterol. The presence of chronic inflammation has been linked to an increased risk of developing breast and colorectal cancer, as well as multiple sclerosis, Parkinson disease, and Alzheimer disease. Adipose tissue secretes hormones that produce a state of chronic inflammation in obese individuals, while physical activity causes contracting muscles to secrete hormones that have a profound anti-inflammatory impact and decrease the level of chronic inflammation present. In this session, attendees will be presented with the current evidence on how anti-inflammatory medications and physical activity can be used as interventions against atherosclerosis, some forms of cancer, and neurodegenerative disorders.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Provide a current definition of chronic inflammation.
    • Describe the evidence that chronic inflammation plays a role in the development and propagation of atherosclerosis, some neurodegenerative disorders, and some forms of cancer.
    • Explain the impact of anti-inflammatory medications on chronic inflammation.
    • Discuss the impact of obesity and physical activity on chronic inflammation.

    Rehabilitation Strategies for Patients With Diabetes Mellitus and Associated Complications

    Time: 10:30 am-12:30 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speaker: Abraham D. Lee, PT, PhD, Rick Black, PT, DPT, MS, GCS

    Level: Intermediate

    The number of people diagnosed with diabetes in the US increased by more than 200% over the last 2 decades, reaching a total of 25.8 million people with health care costs of nearly $200 billion in 2010. People with diabetes are at high risk of developing cardiovascular diseases and various other complications. Physical therapists working in settings from acute hospitals to fitness centers are on the frontline in preventing diabetes and treating individuals with diabetes and diabetes-related complications. This course is designed to help PTs and PTAs fulfill their critical roles in diabetes management. Participants will learn how diabetes affects the functions of multiple organs in the body and how therapeutic exercise can counteract the adverse effects of diabetes on these organs. The first part will focus on the etiology of the onset of diabetes, the progression of the disease in key organs, and exercise-induced biological mechanisms for clinical improvement. The second part will focus on practical aspects of evaluating and treating individuals with diabetes, including the diagnostic criteria for diabetes, the improvement in insulin action with exercise training, the parameters of therapeutic exercise, and precautions for hypoglycemia in patients during exercise.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Explain the diagnostic criteria for diabetes.
    • Describe key proteins and enzymes involved in glucose utilization and production.
    • Identify the biological mechanisms underlying obesity- and inactivity-induced development of insulin resistance and diabetes.
    • Describe how exercise can promote insulin-dependent and insulin-independent glucose utilization by skeletal muscles.
    • Provide a rationale for the prescription of therapeutic exercise with appropriate exercise parameters for individuals with diabetes.
    • Discuss factors that cause hypoglycemia and how to prevent the development of hypoglycemia in individuals with diabetes.

    Linda Crane Lecture: Professionalism and Core Values in Physical Therapy- Lessons Learned From Linda Crane

    Time: 3:30 pm-5:30 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speaker: Lawrence Cahalin PT, PhD, CCS

    Level: Multiple Level

    Linda Crane was committed to professionalism. Her work and all in which she engaged in was consistent with APTA's core values of professionalism. APTA's core values of professionalism will be reviewed and the behaviors demonstrated by Linda Crane will be applied to the values. By Crane's example, others will will better appreciate their own level of professionalism (as well as that of Linda Crane) and develop methods to become professionals that Linda Crane would be proud of.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Briefly review the development of APTA's core values of professionalism.
    • Review APTA's 7 primary core values of professionalism.
    • Evaluate Linda Crane's level of professionalism.
    • Develop methods by which attendees can attain optimal professionalism using Linda Crane as an example.

    Friday, February 10

    Cardiac Comorbidities in Outpatient Settings: Implications for Assessment and Treatment

    Time: 8:00 am-10:00 am (See Program for Room)

    Speaker: Audrey L. Millar, PT, PhD

    Level: Intermediate

    Cardiovascular disease is one of the leading causes of morbidity in the United States, and the chances of an individual having cardiovascular disease increases with age. Thus, there is a good chance that an individual coming to physical therapy will have at least 1 cardiovascular comorbidity. This session will address the most common cardiovascular diseases such as coronary artery disease, atrial fibrillation, hypertension, and heart failure; and associated medical treatments such as medications and pacemakers. The implications of each disease and treatment for physical therapy intervention, and recommendations and relevant guidelines for assessment and treatment, will be discussed. Case studies will be integrated throughout to emphasize the relevance to all physical therapists.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Identify the most common cardiovascular comorbidities or treatments that may present in an outpatient setting.
    • Select appropriate assessment techniques based upon cardiovascular comorbitidity.
    • Select appropriate modifications to physical therapy interventions based upon selected cardiovascular comorbidities or medical treatment.

    Using Yoga and Meditation in Physical Therapy for the Management of Patients With Cardiovascular Disease

    Time: 10:30 am-12:30 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speaker: Pradip K. Ghosh, PT, PhD, DMS

    Level: Intermediate

    The word "yoga" means "to unite" and to direct and concentrate one's attention. Within Eastern traditions, health is seen as the state of balance and equilibrium of mind, body, and spirit. It has often been said that the highest goal of yoga is recognition of self. Yoga is a unifying, transformative, holistic science that fully develops the major faculties in individuals, such as intellect, emotion, sense, motor, and spirit. Through the study of all divisions of yoga people can improve their well-being, master the senses, and control emotions so that they function in perfect harmony and health. This session provides a comprehensive overview of different types of yoga and meditation and their effects on cardiovascular functions. Emphasis is on current research on possible use of yogic breathing and meditation as a complementary treatment approach in the management of patients with cardiovascular disease. The concepts and principles of this session will enhance your knowledge base and skill through lecture and videotape presentations. Effects of practicing yoga and meditation along with evidence-based information on treatment of patients with hypertension and arrhythmia will also be addressed.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Explain the effects of yoga in the management of stress and associated cardiovascular disease.
    • Perform basic yoga poses, different basic yoga breathing, and deep relaxation.
    • Describe the current concept of using yoga and meditation as a complementary approach in the management of patients with cardiovascular disease.
    • Explain the importance of practicing different yogic breathing in increasing the efficacy of physical therapeutic intervention in the management of patients with cardiovascular disease.
    • Integrate therapeutic yoga and breathing with physical therapy in the management of patients with cardiovascular diseases.

    Saturday, February 11

    Diagnosis Dialog: In-patients With Multi-system Involvement-What "Labels" Should We Use? Part 1

    Time: 8:00 am-10:00 am (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Karen E. Abraham-Justice, PhD, Tamara L. Burlis, PT, DPT, Ethel Frese, Pamela K. Levangie, PT, DPT, DSc, FAPTA, Natalie Sebba, PT, DPT, Cynthia Coffin Zadai, PT, DPT, MS, CCS, FAPTA, Barbara J. Norton, PT, PhD, FAPTA

    Level: Multiple Level

    Success in achieving Vision 2020 depends, at least in part, on physical therapists being able to diagnose conditions that are within the scope of their practice and consistently using commonly understood terminology for describing the conditions that affect the movement system of their patients. Specialists have the expertise needed to lead the profession in defining, labeling, and cataloging the diagnoses that are relevant to physical therapists' practice. The primary purpose of this course is to engage specialty section members in a collegial dialog about what "labels" should be used for the conditions physical therapists diagnose. An introduction to some of the issues will be provided in a brief summary of 8 prior meetings about diagnosis. Case descriptions of 3 patients with multi-system involvement will be presented to provide the context for dialog with members of the audience.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Discuss some of the issues and challenges facing our profession regarding diagnosis in physical therapy.
    • Recognize the need for widespread, consistent use of commonly understood terminology for diagnosing conditions of the human movement system.
    • Appreciate how the use of movement-related diagnoses will impact the clinical practice of both women's health specialists and cardiovascular/pulmonary specialists.
    • Participate in defining, "labeling," and cataloging movement-related diagnoses that are within the scope of physical therapy practice.

    Diagnosis Dialog: In-patients With Multi-system Involvement-What "Labels" Should We Use? Part 2

    Time: 10:30 am-12:30 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Tamara L. Burlis, PT, DPT, Ethel Frese, Pamela K. Levangie, PT, DPT, DSc, FAPTA, Karen E. Abraham-Justice, PhD, Cynthia Coffin Zadai, PT, DPT, MS, CCS, FAPTA, Barbara J. Norton, PT, PhD, FAPTA, Natalie Sebba, PT, DPT

    Level: Multiple Level

    The primary purpose of Part 2 of this course is to engage specialty section members in a collegial dialog about what "labels" should be used for the conditions physical therapists diagnose. A recap of Part 1 will occur followed by a continuation of additional case descriptions of patients with multi-system involvement, in addition to dialog with members of the audience. The focus of the discussion will be on identifying the signs, symptoms, and other factors that distinguish human movement system conditions and providing clinically useful "labels" for the conditions that are identified.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Recognize some of the issues and challenges facing our profession regarding diagnosis in physical therapy.
    • Recognize the need for widespread, consistent use of commonly understood terminology for diagnosing conditions of the human movement system.
    • Appreciate how the use of movement-related diagnoses will impact the clinical practice of both women's health specialists and cardiovascular and pulmonary specialists.
    • Participate in defining "labeling" and cataloging movement-related diagnoses that are within the scope of physical therapy practice.

    Pediatric Obesity: A Multi-disciplinary Approach to a Multi-faceted Problem

    Time: 3:30 pm-5:30 pm (See Program for Room)

    (Joint Program: Pediatrics)

    Speaker: Sharon A. Martino, PhD

    Level: Basic

    Pediatric obesity is a multi-faceted disorder with concomitant effects on the cardiovascular, pulmonary, musculoskeletal, endocrine, and psychosocial systems. The need for multi-disciplinary intervention programs is clear; however, the assessment of the overweight/obese child is less apparent, with the choice of outcome measures even less evident. Cardio-metabolic measures such as waist circumference, fasting blood glucose, blood pressure, and lipids are suitable for this population and may be more reliable than the body mass index (BMI) alone for predicting future cardiopulmonary/vascular disease. The speaker will describe outcome measures that address each of the aforementioned systems, including cardio metabolic, body composition, fitness and strength, and quality of life measures that are appropriate for the overweight and obese child. In addition, the speaker will discuss the development, standardization, and sustainability of a multi-disciplinary program (Fit Kids for Life) as well as case studies of children and adolescents who have completed the Fit Kids program. Finally, data and findings from a randomized, prospective study of the Fit Kids for Life program will be presented and future research directions elucidated.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Identify the organ systems and common complications that are related to pediatric obesity.
    • Recognize alternative methods for assessing the child who is overweight or obese.
    • Discuss methods for the development of multi-disciplinary teams and programs to address pediatric obesity.
    • Describe the importance of as well as methods for standardizing exercise programs.
    • Express the important role that physical therapists can and should assume in the multi-disciplinary team approach to pediatric obesity.
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