Archive: CSM 2012: Education Programming

  • This is archived programming for CSM 2012. See current programming.

    Browse Education sessions by day. Return to the main topic menu.

    Tuesday, February 7 | Wednesday, February 8 | Thursday, February 9 | Friday, February 10 | Saturday, February 11 

    * Should you choose to preselect sessions during the registration process, please be advised that preselection is not a guarantee of a seat. Attendees are asked to preselect to better determine room size and all efforts will be made to accommodate sessions in the largest rooms possible. All attendees are encouraged to show up to sessions early. Attendees are also encouraged to select alternative sessions in the event their first choice is full. 

    Tuesday, February 7 (Preconference)

    Systematic Program Assessment: A Dialog and Workshop for PTA Educators, Part 1

    Time: 8:00 am-5:30 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speaker: Becky S. McKnight, PT, MS

    Level: Intermediate

    Preconference Pricing: Standard (2 Day) 

    CEUs: 1.4 (14 contact hours/CCUs)

    This 2-day workshop is designed for PTA educators from established academic programs. The workshop will open with a review of the principles of program assessment followed by a discussion of current literature. Small- and large-group activities will be used to provide participants with the opportunity to self-evaluate their program assessment plans as well as receive peer feedback. Group activities also will include creating assessment tools for various aspects of the assessment process. Specific tools and topic areas will be determined based upon participants' identified area of need.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Describe critical elements of a program assessment plan.
    • Describe methods to structure assessment processes to increase efficiency, efficacy, and effectiveness.
    • Evaluate their PTA program assessment plan in light of critical elements.
    • Select methods to improve their PTA program assessment plan.
    • Create assessment tools required to adequately evaluate specific components of their PTA program.
    • Clearly communicate, in written form, a comprehensive program assessment plan to bodies of interest (eg, state agencies, administration, CAPTE).

    Wednesday, February 8 (Preconference)

    Going Global: Preparing for Engagement in Underserved Areas at Home and Abroad

    Time: 8:00 am-5:30 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Kim Dunleavy, PT, PhD, MS, MOMT, OCS, Celia Pechak, PT, PhD, MPH, Alice Salzman, PT, EdD, Jill Lattanzi

    Level: Multiple Level

    Preconference Pricing: Standard 

    CEUs: 0.8 (8 contact hours/CCUs)

    Physical therapists and physical therapist assistants are increasingly engaged in global health activities in under-resourced areas. There is a wide spectrum of emerging roles for PTs and PTAs at home and abroad, including clinical service, teaching, research, and service-learning. Whether planning to volunteer or seek employment, PTs and PTAs must consider many factors while preparing, including: differences in PT/PTA education, scope of practice, and licensing; cultural considerations; safety; and determining the best fit between the individual and partner agency. This session will prepare participants for volunteer or paid positions in underserved areas at home or abroad. Through lecture, case-based discussions, and problem-solving activities, presenters and attendees will discuss models for the provision of rehabilitation services and epidemiology of diseases, personal and professional considerations when choosing a volunteer or paid opportunity, ethical considerations when providing services, teaching as a means to enhance the sustainability of change, and ways to adapt equipment, interventions, and teaching when resources are limited. This course is intended for individuals who are beginning to explore options for engagement in the global health arena, those who are interested in learning from others' experiences, and those who can share what they have learned while working in underserved areas.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Evaluate the impact of various models for provision of rehabilitation services in underserved areas.
    • Distinguish the epidemiology of diseases in developing and developed countries.
    • Prepare for work or volunteering in underserved areas, including choosing an organization, self-assessment of abilities, safety, and development of contacts.
    • Apply decision-making strategies for provision of physical therapy in underserved areas using selected case studies.
    • Discuss adaptation of physical therapy services and educational interventions in underserved areas based on differences in provider expertise and equipment availability.
    • Explain how effective teaching of providers can increase sustainability of change in rehabilitation services in underserved areas.

    Systematic Program Assessment: A Dialog and Workshop for PTA Educators, Part 2

    Time: 8:00 am-5:30 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speaker: Becky S. McKnight, PT, MS

    Level: Intermediate

    Preconference Pricing: Standard (2 Day) 

    CEUs: 1.4 (14 contact hours/CCUs)

    This 2-day workshop is designed for PTA educators from established academic programs. The workshop will open with a review of the principles of program assessment followed by a discussion of current literature. Small- and large-group activities will be used to provide participants with the opportunity to self-evaluate their program assessment plans as well as receive peer feedback. Group activities also will include creating assessment tools for various aspects of the assessment process. Specific tools and topic areas will be determined based upon participants' identified area of need.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Describe critical elements of a program assessment plan.
    • Describe methods to structure assessment processes to increase efficiency, efficacy, and effectiveness.
    • Evaluate their PTA program assessment plan in light of critical elements.
    • Select methods to improve their PTA program assessment plan.
    • Create assessment tools required to adequately evaluate specific components of their PTA program.
    • Clearly communicate, in written form, a comprehensive program assessment plan to bodies of interest (eg, state agencies, administration, CAPTE).

    Thursday, February 9

    It's All in the Family: Instructional Collaboration Using the Integrated Longitudinal Case-based Learning Model

    Time: 8:00 am-10:00 am (See Program for Room)

    Speaker: Valerie A. Strunk, PT, MS, Peter Altenburger, PT, PhD, Amy J. Bayliss, PT, DPT, Mary T. Loghmani, PT, PhD, MTC

    Level: Basic

    The Indiana University Doctor of Physical Therapy Family Tree: An Integrated Case Series, now in its second edition, was created by faculty and students as a teaching and learning resource. This session will present the curricular evolution experienced through the adaptation of the case-based teaching tool and how the Family Tree was used to create a progressive approach to teaching within the curriculum. The speakers will present assessment data from student learning; changes made in the second edition of the Family Tree; and examples of specific, successful teaching applications of the Family Tree, particularly in the context of cultural and ethical awareness. Participants will learn about the positive impact of this teaching model on faculty collaboration, as well as future directions and limitations with respect to the application of this model.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Discuss the value of using case study methodology as an educational tool for learning.
    • Identify the risks and benefits of establishing an integrative case-based curricular approach.
    • Apply case study methodology longitudinally throughout a curriculum using specific teaching resources.
    • Enhance student cultural and ethical awareness using case study methodology both within and across coursework.
    • Create appropriate outcome measures for assessment of student learning with respect to integrative case-based teaching.
    • Determine key characteristics of a successful approach to creating a collaborative faculty environment designed to enhance student learning through an integrative teaching model.

    An Introduction to Motivational Interviewing in Physical Therapy

    Time: 8:00 am-10:00 am (See Program for Room)

    Speaker: Robert Scales, PhD, Reed Humphrey, PT, PhD

    Level: Basic

    Motivating patients to adopt a healthful treatment plan during brief office visits is a major challenge facing health care providers. Traditional approaches to patient care often rely on advice giving and direct persuasion. This can easily lead to confrontation and may result in resistance, particularly in patients who are ambivalent about changing their behavior. Motivational interviewing is an alternate style of communication that has demonstrated success with very resistant clients, such as those recovering from drug and alcohol addiction. More recent adaptations of this approach to medical settings have been effective in improving a wide range of health behaviors, including those that are promoted in physical therapy. This motivational approach is well suited to the daily practice of a busy clinic, where improved patient compliance is a priority. Skillful application by a clinician provides the platform for patients to talk about change instead of exhibiting resistance. Consequently, clinical consultations will not only be more effective, but also less frustrating for the provider.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Recognize ways in which patient resistance is exhibited during clinical consultations.
    • Demonstrate an increased understanding of the research and theoretical framework upon which motivational interviewing is based.
    • Identify the key components of a motivational interview and how they can be used to lower resistance and promote behavior change in patients from different cultural backgrounds.

    The Introduction and Integration of Insurance Medical Policies Into an Existing Classroom-based Clinical Conference Course

    Time: 8:00 am-10:00 am (See Program for Room)

    Speaker: Rhea Cohn, PT, DPT, Philip Blatt, PT, PhD, NCS

    Level: Multiple Level

    A critical component of students' preparation for the clinical experience is the understanding and integration of insurance issues into the clinical decision-making process. This session will describe how an existing case-based course, "Clinical Conference V", was modified to include the introduction and application of 3 different, current payer medical policies into treatment planning. Students needed to consider the policies when establishing a plan of care, making treatment decisions, and documenting in the medical record for 3 clinically complex patients: ORIF hip fracture complicated by lung cancer, postoperative ACL reconstruction complicated by rheumatoid arthritis, and subdural hematoma complicated by Parkinson disease. Portions of the medical policies that impacted students' treatment planning and documentation included restrictions on length of episode, medical necessity considerations, equipment needs, discharge planning, and home program instruction. Videotaped encounters of student care teams interacting with the simulated patients and follow-up discussions with the "insurance consultant" will be included in the presentation. The speakers will discuss the academic model for the course as well as the challenges and successes of this curriculum design innovation. The session will include group discussion of current curriculum structure and identification of courses that could accommodate this model.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Recognize the value of integrating information on payers' medical policies into the classroom experience prior to internships.
    • Identify opportunities in academic curricula for integration of payers' medical policies into existing case-based courses.
    • Access payers' medical policies on the Internet and identify key language that will impact clinical decision making.
    • Create objectives for adding insurance and medical policy information into academic coursework.

    Engaging Students in 140 Characters or Less: Using Social Media in the Physical Therapy Classroom

    Time: 8:00 am-10:00 am (See Program for Room)

    Speaker: Kendra L. Gagnon, PT, PhD

    Level: Basic

    Social media sites such as Twitter have become a prevalent part of our culture and provide new opportunities for personal, educational, and professional communication. While educators may see these technologies as a barrier in the classroom, use of social media in higher education can increase student engagement, foster collaborative and responsive learning experiences, and prepare students to use social media appropriately and effectively as health care professionals. This course will introduce the physical therapy educator to Twitter and other Web 2.0 technologies that may be used to enhance student engagement, collaboration, and professionalism in and out of the classroom. Attendees will learn how various social media have been used to transform a "traditional" lecture- and lab-based physical therapy course, with a discussion of student feedback, opportunities discovered, and challenges faced when using social media to complete educational tasks and assignments. A combination of presentation, demonstration, and discussion, this workshop will help participants expand their understanding of social media and learn how social media may be used to enrich both in-class and online learning for physical therapy students.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Identify various forms of popular social media and Web 2.0 technologies and understand how they are used for personal and professional communication.
    • Describe strategies to apply social media to "traditional" educational experiences to enhance in-class and online learning.
    • Through group discussion, identify opportunities and challenges associated with educational and professional use of social media.
    • Match educational experiences and professional needs with appropriate social media.
    • Develop classroom rules and departmental policies that reflect ethical and legal use of social media in health care and education.

    Making the Decision: Identifying Reasonable Accommodations for Students With Disabilities

    Time: 10:30 am-12:30 pm (See Program for Room)

    (Joint Program: Health Policy and Administration)

    Speaker: Carol Beckel, PT, MA, Susan E. Roush, PT, PhD, Nancy Sharby, PT, DPT

    Level: Intermediate

    This course will help academicians and clinicians identify reasonable accommodations for physical therapist and physical therapist assistant students or employees with disabilities in the classroom and the clinic. The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and its 2009 Amendments will be summarized and the way this statute influences the provision of accommodations for students or employees with disabilities will be described. While there are general principles that must be applied to everyone, there are no prescribed interventions. The speakers will provide various decision-making models regarding how individual accommodations are identified. Data will be presented on the current manner in which ACCEs and DCEs are making these decisions for students who are entering the clinical phase of their programs. Finally, participants will engage in small-group discussions regarding accommodations provided in the classroom and clinic settings, based on personal experiences and case studies provided by the presenters. Attendees will learn to develop strategies to assess, design, and implement reasonable accommodations in their work settings.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Explain the requirements of the ADA when developing reasonable accommodations for PT and PTA students with disabilities.
    • Evaluate how decisions are made at your institution regarding reasonable accommodations.
    • Establish specific guidelines for determining reasonable accommodations at your institution.
    • Incorporate accommodations for students with disabilities in the specific classroom and clinical settings.

    Social Media in Health Care Is Here to Stay: Ethical and Legal Considerations

    Time: 3:30 pm-5:30 pm (See Program for Room)

    (Joint Program: Health Policy and Administration)

    Speaker: Kyle Hewson, PT, EdD, Alexander Lopez, JD, OTR/L

    Level: Multiple Level

    Throughout recent years, there has been tremendous growth in the use and the acceptance of social media as a normal process of communication not only on a personal and social level, but within the health care system. But every nuance, especially when partnered with medicine, has its risks and benefits. Ethical issues, such as confidentiality, truthfulness, and justice, arise and can become entwined with legal matters regarding ownership, libel, and privacy. Participants will discuss the role of social media within their work environment, share scenarios which have caused conflict, and collectively, using the APTA Core Values and the APTA Code of Ethics, find solutions and utilize useful strategies when dealing with patients, students, and health care providers.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Describe common uses of social media within the present health care system.
    • Identify ethical principles that are violated with use of social media.
    • Interpret federal and state regulations regarding social media and personal and professional boundaries.
    • Assess the potential risks and benefits as health care systems. embrace and expand their social networking to their patients and community members.
    • Plan for and consider options for future institutional policy making regarding social media.

    Friday, February 10

    Writing an Abstract for Presentation

    Time: 8:00 am-10:00 am (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Maura Daly Iversen, PT, DPT, SD, MPH, David A. Lake, PT, PhD, Jennifer W. Rodriguez, MHS, Steve Tippett, PT, PhD

    Level: Intermediate

    Doing educational research and presenting it at professional meetings is important both to the individual Education Section member and to the section as a whole. One goal of the Education Section is to "promote scholarly activities and access to new knowledge that facilitates evidence-based practices" in physical therapy education. In addition, physical therapy faculty face increased emphasis on independent scholarly work for tenure and promotion at academic institutions and to meet the Commission on Accreditation for Physical Therapy Education criterion for faculty scholarship activities. This session, conducted by the members of the Education Section Research Committee, is for academic or clinical faculty who are feeling challenged in developing an acceptable abstract for professional presentation. Presenters will explore the features of good abstracts including asking key questions such as: "Why did you start?", "What did you do?", "What did you find?" and "What does it mean?" Examples of good and problem abstracts, and different abstract formats will be discussed. Development of "Special Topics" abstracts will be discussed and opportunities to develop these types of abstracts will be provided. Participants are encouraged to bring abstracts, research ideas, or research results so that they can work in groups to improve or develop abstracts.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Apply the components of a good abstract to developing an abstract.
    • Critique abstracts to improve them.
    • Write a successful abstract.

    Intellectual Property and Partnerships: The Value of Your Ideas

    Time: 8:00 am-10:00 am (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Carla Sabus, PhD, Patricia Kluding, PT, PhD, Lisa VanHoose, Lisa A. Stehno-Bittel, PT, PhD, James Baxendale, MS, MBA

    Level: Intermediate

    One result of the recent political climate and economic challenges in the US is a decline in the research funding that is essential for professional discovery and innovation, physical therapy program support, and the academic careers of research faculty. While the medical industry, particularly pharmacology, responded as early as the 1980s to funding contraction, physical therapy academic researchers have been slower to respond by seeking industry support for research. Discovery and innovation, whether achieved through federal or industry support, introduces intellectual property issues. This session represents a continuum of industry-academic partnership that exemplifies a range of funding sources from patenting a novel idea for sale to private companies to serving as a clinical testing site for a multi-center industry-sponsored study. Through group and panel discussion, presenters will discuss opportunities and potential pitfalls of academic-industry partnerships and guiding principles for these partnerships based on current literature and legal implications.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Articulate the legal and financial implications of industry-academic research partnerships.
    • Identify resources that can assist a program or researcher in establishing policy or protocols in industry-academic partnerships.
    • Recognize the rights of the individual and institution regarding intellectual property.
    • Recognize the diverse forms of intellectual property and opportunities to leverage them.
    • Through group discussion and information sharing, identify divergent sources of funding for physical therapy research.

    Educators in Global Health: The PT-PTA Relationship During Disaster Relief Work

    Time: 8:00 am-10:00 am (See Program for Room)

    (Joint Program: Health Policy and Administration)

    Speakers: Susan G. Klappa, PT, PhD, Becky Crocker, PT, DPT, Niki Wallen, AAS

    Level: Multiple Level

    PTs and PTAs are taking on new roles in global health, working as educators with rehabilitation technicians-in-training and as clinicians with patients and families doing disaster relief volunteer work. Sustainable practice requires clinicians to embrace their role as educators. We have the potential to greatly help or harm patients, families, trainees, and organizations providing services depending on the approach used when educating others. The APTA Code of Ethics for PTs and the Standards of Ethical Conduct for PTAs challenge us to be respectful of all patients and communities we serve. Do these documents continue to guide our actions in domestic or international disaster relief settings? Through the use of case studies, this session addresses the roles of PTs and PTAs providing disaster relief in Haiti, especially our collaborative role as educators for developing authentic, sustainable, ethical, and just partnerships in communities that are rebuilding following a disaster, and the public's perception of our profession as a result of our engagement in disaster relief.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Collaborate regarding the meaning of our profession's core documents, which serve as guiding principles for our PT and PTA roles when participating in disaster relief work.
    • Discuss practical considerations of the PT-PTA relationship when working in a disaster relief setting.
    • Articulate strategies for sustainability through education via partnership and community engagement.
    • Discuss strategies for educating the public on the PT-PTA relationship in the global health setting at home and abroad.

    Taking "STEPS" Toward a New Model of Early Clinical Education

    Time: 8:00 am-10:00 am (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Kyle Covington, PT, DPT, Corrie Odom, Matthew G. Roman, PT, MPT, Jan L. Gwyer, PT, PhD, Kara Lardinois, PT, DPT, Carol Ann Nelson, Elizabeth Ross, PT, DPT, Carol Figuers, PT, EdD

    Level: Multiple Level

    Early clinical placements allow immediate application of didactic material; however, early learners often struggle to integrate knowledge and skills from the classroom into the patient care environment. Academic institutions have a responsibility to students and clinical instructors (CIs) to monitor and ensure the quality of clinical education being provided, and they have a fiduciary duty to the clinical managers who have agreed to accept students while challenged to ensure adequate student supervision and provide CIs with time for teaching. This session presents the processes developed by 1physical therapist program tomatch clinical experiences to didactic content by using planned learning experiences, skills assessments, targeted behavioral objectives, and guided reflection discussion boards. Presenters will discuss methods of partnering with clinicians to facilitate optimal learning opportunities for students and provide professional development for CIs and support for clinical managers.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Discuss the current pressures facing early clinical education in physical therapy.
    • Examine multiple methods of promoting intentional learning in the clinic.
    • Explore the use of technology to enhance the delivery of clinical curricula.
    • Describe the different perspectives of the stakeholders in early clinical education including the student, clinical instructor, clinical manager, and academic faculty.
    • Discuss strategies for enhancing clinical application of didactic content.
    • Examine assessment strategies for early learners in the clinic.

    Promoting the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning Using Video-based Cases

    Time: 10:30 am-12:30 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Catherine Maher, PT, DPT, Genevieve Pinto Zipp, PT, EdD

    Level: Multiple Level

    Is there an art to using video to promote a rich environment for the scholarship of teaching and learning? How can clinical faculty use video-based case studies to prepare students for and complement their clinical experiences? This session explores several active teaching and learning strategies that transform video case presentations from passive to active learning experiences. When video cases are presented using active learning strategies, students perceive that the video cases help them to integrate information, decrease their stress levels of working with clients, and enhance their ability to critically approach the development of a patient's plan of care. Discussion and hands-on experience using video-based cases will help participations to develop students' knowledge and critical thinking skills.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Discuss the tenets associated with active learning video cases.
    • Develop questions and thought-provoking comments to foster critical thinking during the presentation of an active learning video-based case.
    • Identify potential options within your own curriculum and clinical experiences for active learning via video based case infusion.
    • Discuss the evidence currently available on using video-based cases as a learning strategy.

    Help! I Need Evidence! An Approach to Seeking the Answer for Your Clinical Question

    Time: 10:30 am-12:30 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Randy R. Richter, PT, PhD, Chris A. Sebelski, PT, DPT, OCS, CSCS, Tricia M. Austin, PT, PhD, ATC

    Level: Multiple Level

    Clinicians continue to struggle to incorporate principles of evidence-based practice (EBP) in a highly demanding clinical environment. Databases that include synopses of evidence are available; however, they will not have answers to all clinical questions. In these instances, clinicians must search for answers in databases that include original sources, finding several studies related to their clinical question. Since abstracts may be used when deciding what articles to read, using a systematic approach to reading abstracts will enable clinicians to quickly choose an appropriate study for their clinical question. The systematic approach presented in this session begins by answering 3 questions based on the abstract: "Am I confident in the study results?" "Do I and my patients believe the results are clinically meaningful?" and "Can I apply the information in my clinical setting?" Presenters will demonstrate appraising abstracts of intervention (group studies and systematic reviews), diagnostic, and prognostic studies across patient populations and types of care. By answering these 3 questions clinicians will make an informed decision about which articles to read, enhancing application of EBP for patient care.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Read an abstract and answer the questions: "Am I confident in the study results?" "Do I and my patients believe the results are clinically meaningful?" and "Can I apply the information in my clinical setting?"
    • Appraise abstracts of intervention, diagnosis, and prognosis studies to determine a study's potential applicability to a clinical question.
    • Explain the strengths and limits of the abstract appraisal approach.

    Beginning With the End in Mind: Evaluating Outcomes of Cultural Competence Instruction

    Time: 10:30 am-12:30 pm (See Program for Room)

    (Joint Program: Geriatrics)

    Speakers: Karen J. Panzarella, PT, PhD, Patricial Nowakowski, PT, PhD

    Level: Intermediate

    Assessment drives student learning and has powerful effects on student outcomes. Components of the curriculum only hold weight when students expect to be tested. If cultural competence is important enough to embed in the curriculum, it should have an assessment that bears weight when measuring student performance. It seems that the traditional approach of paper/pencil testing may not be the best for determining competence in culture. Assessments that challenge students to apply what they know in a simulated clinical situation will likely improve their ability to generalize, integrate, synthesize, and interact effectively. This session will describe 2 state-of-the-art methods to teach and assess cultural competence: use of standardized patients (SPs) to assess student's clinical and cultural competence, and use of medical simulation scenarios for both instruction and assessment of cultural competence.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Identify introductory, primary, and supplemental courses within your DPT curricula for infusion of cultural competence instruction and modify to your own curriculums.
    • Discuss activities for improving students' own cultural awareness and knowledge of diverse cultures and practices.
    • Discuss techniques to improve students' skill in the assessment and intervention planning of clients from diverse cultures.
    • Use the Campinha-Bacote model as a guide for teaching cultural competence.
    • Use the culture-brokering model for identifying and devising solutions for culturally related problems.
    • Discuss assessment techniques to evaluate the outcomes of cultural competence instruction.
    • Identify ideas for cultural encounters within their communities.

    Pauline Cerasoli Lecture: Googling, Texting, and Browsing, Oh My! Mentoring and Teaching in an Electronic Age

    Time: 3:30 pm-4:30 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speaker: Christine P. Baker, PT, EdD

    I remember when lectures were not accompanied by PowerPoint slides, when research was done by actually entering the library building, or when cell phones did not ring during a client's treatment session. Our technology has made our professional lives easier in many ways, but it also presents us with dilemmas. This presentation will outline benefits and challenges encountered as we use technology to teach and mentor entry-level students as well as those pursuing postprofessional degrees.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Discuss the benefits of using technology in teaching and mentoring.
    • Discuss challenges presented when using technology in teaching and mentoring.

    Saturday, February 11

    Manuscript Cafe

    Time: 8:00 am-10:00 am (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Jan Reynolds, Patricia J. Ohtake, PT, PhD, Rebecca Craik, PT, PhD, FAPTA

    Level: Multiple Level

    Authors want to "get it right" and get published. Reviewers want to build their scholarly contributions and use their time efficiently. Join PTJ editors for breakfast and conversation about how to accomplish your goals. View the tutorial at http://ptjournal.apta.org/site/misc/iforr.xhtml prior to the session, and come with questions! A valuable session for authors and reviewers of any journal.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Describe trends in peer review and how your own professional development is affected by them.
    • Identify manuscript weaknesses that can bog down the review process and reduce chances of success.
    • Discuss guidelines for reporting research-CONSORT, PRISMA, STROBE, STARD, QUARLES-and why more and more journals are requiring them.
    • List tips for ensuring that a manuscript meets submission requirements.

    Find the Lesson in the Fun: Innovative Teaching Strategies for the PTA

    Time: 8:00 am-10:00 am (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Rebecca Crocker, PT, DPT, Niki Wallen, AAS, Celinda P. Evitt, PT, PhD, MA

    Level: Multiple Level

    This interactive educational session will explore the critical thinking/problem-solving skills expected of the PTA. A variety of teaching strategies will be discussed, demonstrated, and provided for participants. Small-group sessions will allow participants to develop innovative, task-specific teaching strategies and share ideas, develop new strategies, and share useful Web sites. Participants will leave with some new, fun, effective, and innovative teaching strategies designed to facilitate the critical thinking and problem-solving skills of the PTA student.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Discuss critical thinking/problem-solving skills expected of the PTA.
    • Compare and contrast active teaching strategies.
    • Locate additional active teaching strategies to enhance critical thinking and problem-solving skills of the PTA student.
    • Create an active teaching strategy that is specific to the needs of your program.
    • Use new active-teaching strategies (acquired during this session) with your students.

    PTA Lab Practicals: A Time to Panic or a Meaningful Learning Opportunity?

    Time: 10:30 am-12:30 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Tiffany Bohm, PT, DPT, Daryl Menke, PT, DPT, MCMT

    Level: Intermediate

    Have you ever wondered how the structure of your practical examinations compares to what is being done by other PTA educators? Many educators conduct examinations in a certain way without considering other options. The speakers propose that, in addition to being used to evaluate performance, practical examinations provide meaningful learning opportunities. Course participants will design mock practical examinations, which will be shared with all participants.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Compare and contrast the research related to various educational theories used in practical examinations.
    • Identify current trends in PTA programs related to the structure and expectations of practical examinations.
    • Discuss opportunities and barriers present to using practicals as a significant learning experience.
    • Identify the use of technology as an adjunct to learning and assessment in practical examinations.
    • Develop a mock practical examination based on discussed research and ideas shared by course participants.

    Capturing Practical Knowledge in Clinical Practice: Clinical Narratives

    Time: 10:30 am-12:30 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Bruce Greenfield, PT, PhD, OCS, Gail M. Jensen, PhD, Elizabeth Mostrom, PT, PhD

    Level: Basic

    Many educators and experienced clinicians have learned that contextual issues that emerge during real-life situations in clinical practice are uniquely challenging to students, residents, novice clinicians, clinical instructors, and mentors. Students in physical therapist education programs often become frustrated when first encountering clinical situations in which theory and practice guidelines have no immediately apparent relevance. Novice clinicians may feel unprepared to deal with a "difficult" patient who is manipulative or passive aggressive. In turn, more experienced physical therapists who are training in a residency program are stymied when their clinical mentor performs a successful intervention that is counter-intuitive based on well-designed practice guidelines. Clinical instructors and mentors can be challenged in finding the best way to guide the development of students, novice clinician, or resident's clinical-reasoning process. Clinical narratives are one way to capture practical or clinical knowledge that is the everyday understanding of practice. This course will provide a foundation for understanding the value of the narrative processes of case construction, deconstruction, and reconstruction across the continuum of professional development (student, clinician, resident, and clinical teacher); introduce practical tools for capturing narratives; and discuss strategies for implementing narrative methods as part of professional development and residency programs.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Apply practical tools that can be used in the development of meta-cognitive skills, including critical self-reflection and the development of teaching scripts.
    • Consider how the use of narrative tools fosters the development of these skills in students, clinicians, clinical teachers, and mentors.
    • Share models of narrative methods and inquiry currently being used in selected clinical settings.
    • Describe the process, opportunities, and challenges associated with the use of clinical narratives in staff development and recognition programs.

    Infusing Active Learning Through the Mind-Mapping Learning Strategy

    Time: 3:30 pm-5:30 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Catherine Maher, PT, DPT, Genevieve Pinto Zipp, PT, EdD

    Level: Multiple Level

    Developing a patient's/client's plan of care requires physical therapists to integrate data from diverse perspectives. Mind-mapping is an approach to learning that forces learners to think in a curvilinear manner using visuospatial relationships flowing from a central theme to peripheral branches. Mind-mapping is emerging as a positive learning strategy in teaching health science students and may facilitate students' ability to critically reflect upon and analyze the information needed to develop or modify a patient's plan of care. Using mind-mapping, the speakers will actively engage the participants in a discussion and hands-on experience to develop a knowledge base and critical thinking skills.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Discuss the tenets associated with a mind map.
    • Develop a mind map.
    • Identify potential options within your own curriculum for mind-map infusion.
    • Discuss the evidence currently available with regard to the use of mind-mapping as a learning strategy.

    Cell Biology of Disease and Exercise: Incorporation Into a DPT Curriculum

    and Implications for Clinical Practice

    Time: 3:30 pm-5:30 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Michele Basso, EdD, Cassandra Kujanek, PT, DPT, Selena Eskinazi-Budge, PT, DPT, CSCS, Louise Thoma, PT, DPT, Jessica Nelson, PT, DPT

    Level: Multiple Level

    As molecular biology and other invasive basic science approaches begin to translate into treatments for human disease, the demand on physical therapists to understand the cellular mechanisms of both the disease and intervention will increase. The impact of exercise interventions on cellular and molecular processes of diseases rarely occurs in PT student education, but it may be critically important to future practice. Recognition and use of common cell biology terms and processes facilitates the comprehension of current research and aids in clear communication with other health care providers and translational scientists. This presentation will highlight a unique PT student course designed to teach PT students to understand the cellular biology of various diseases treated by physical therapists; recognize the beneficial and detrimental effects of exercise on those cellular processes; and use these to determine the best PT treatment approach for each disease. To facilitate a high-level of comprehension, students created WIKI sites for each disease. The speakers will provide pedagogical overviews and the student perspective of the course and WIKI construction. To demonstrate the depth of knowledge gained, 4 students will present their WIKI pages and provide cellular evidence for treatments in aging, breast cancer, metabolic syndrome, and stroke.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Analyze the role and potential use of WIKI to enhance students' problem-based learning, critical thinking, and participation within physical therapist student coursework.
    • Demonstrate how, through the use of a WIKI, physical therapist students can promote evidence-based practice within their field by developing a resource for professionals based on high-level evidence.
    • Compare and contrast active-based learning tasks and their impact on collaborative learning, advanced critical synthesis, and literature consumption in physical therapist education.
    • Synthesize evidence of the benefit of physical therapy in altering disease processes and reducing risk factors at the cellular level for aging, breast cancer, metabolic syndrome, and stroke.
    • Provide treatment recommendations and precautions for aging, breast cancer, metabolic syndrome, and stroke based on cellular factors.
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