Archive: CSM 2012: Geriatrics Programming

  • This is archived programming for CSM 2012. See current programming.

    Browse Geriatrics sessions by day. Return to the main topic menu.

    Tuesday, February 7 | Wednesday, February 8 | Thursday, February 9 | Friday, February 10 | Saturday, February 11 

    * Should you choose to preselect sessions during the registration process, please be advised that preselection is not a guarantee of a seat. Attendees are asked to preselect to better determine room size and all efforts will be made to accommodate sessions in the largest rooms possible. All attendees are encouraged to show up to sessions early. Attendees are also encouraged to select alternative sessions in the event their first choice is full. 

    Tuesday, February 7 (Preconference)

    Clinical Residency 101: Getting Started and Doing It Well

    Time: 8:00 am-5:30 pm (See Program for Room)

    (Joint Program: Sports Physical Therapy, Education, Clinical Electrophysiology and Wound Management, Neurology, Women's Health)

    Speakers: Greg W. Hartley, PT, DPT, Teresa Schuemann, PT, DPT, Scott Straker, PT, MS

    Level: Intermediate

    Preconference Pricing: Standard 

    CEUs: 0.9 (9 contact hours/CCUs)

    This workshop is ideal for individuals and organizations interested in developing a credentialed clinical residency. Learn about the process from individuals who have guided their clinical residency through a successful credentialing outcome and from representatives of APTA's Committee on Residency Credentialing. Innovative ways to address the credentialing criteria will be explored to make a clinical residency fit your unique situation.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Justify the rationale for a clinical residency that includes a discussion of the benefits and challenges.
    • Assemble the necessary resources for the development of a clinical residency, including the development of unique partnerships.
    • Market a clinical residency to administration and to potential residents.
    • Formulate a budget and establish the cost-effectiveness of a clinical residency.
    • Prepare an application for the credentialing process.

    Wednesday, February 8 (Preconference)

    The Science and Practice of Integrative Therapies in Physical Therapy: A Movement Whose Time Has Come

    Time: 8:00 am-5:30 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Catherine C. Goodman, PT, MBA, CBP, Carol M. Davis, PT, DPT, EdD, FAPTA, Mary Lou Galantino, PT, PhD, MSCE, Jennifer M. Bottomley, PT, PhD, MS, Brent Anderson, PT, PhD, OCS

    Level: Multiple Level

    Preconference Pricing: Standard Plus 

    CEUs: 0.9 (9 contact hours/CCUs)

    This 1-day course is designed to describe the science and practice of integrative (complementary) therapies in rehabilitation and the evidence for efficacy in therapy, prevention, and wellness. Physical therapists using integrative therapies will report on evidence and their patient experiences using such therapies as yoga, tai chi, Pilates, myofascial release, and Body Talk.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Present evidence behind the science of energy-based integrative therapies.
    • Explore the changing world view of science and its role in dictating treatment in physical therapy.
    • Describe the importance of the randomized trial and the challenges associated with this method.
    • Discuss difficulties that physical therapists experience when proposing programs featuring the use of integrative therapies within traditional settings.
    • Explain how physical therapists are using these therapies in day-to-day practice.
    • Highlight funded and non-funded research already being carried out and disseminated.

    Residency and Fellowship Mentoring: Advancing the Resident and Developing the Faculty

    Time: 8:00 am-5:30 pm (See Program for Room)

    (Joint Program: Sports Physical Therapy, Education, Clinical Electrophysiology and Wound Management, Neurology, Women's Health)

    Speakers: Greg W. Hartley, PT, DPT, Ivan Matsui, PT, FAAOMPT, Gail M. Jensen, PT, PhD, Carol Jo Tichenor, PT, MA, FAAOMPT

    Level: Intermediate

    Preconference Pricing: Standard 

    CEUs: 0.9 (9 contact hours/CCUs)

    Professional competence goes well beyond technical skills: It builds on a foundation of basic clinical skills, scientific knowledge, and moral development. Mentorship is a critical element in the formation of a professional. Attendees will receive in-depth instruction in the skills necessary for residency and fellowship clinical mentoring as well as the opportunity to apply those skills in interactive problem-solving situations. This 8-hour course is directed toward academic and clinical educators who are currently teaching in or considering developing residency and fellowship programs. The speakers will teach individuals how to design, implement, and evaluate mentoring experiences in postgraduate residencies and fellowships. Topics will include: characteristics of a good mentor, how mentoring differs from traditional teaching, how to structure productive mentoring sessions to facilitate clinical reasoning, strategies for mentoring the difficult resident, planning remediation sessions, methods for facilitating communication between faculty members and among faculty and residents, and assessment of the effectiveness of the mentoring experiences. Participants will also learn strategies that can be applied to mentoring PT colleagues and entry-level students.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Compare and contrast the characteristics of a good mentor and reflect on your own clinical teaching experience.
    • Analyze and structure mentoring experiences to facilitate reflective thinking and enhance clinical growth for the resident and for the faculty mentor.
    • Develop strategies for addressing common mentoring challenges in residency and fellowship programs.
    • Guide the resident in implementing strategies for change.
    • Design activities for developing and evaluating mentoring skills for new faculty members.

    Thursday, February 9

    No Crashing, No Burning: Improving Function and Managing Pain in Clients With Neuropathy

    Time: 8:00 am-10:00 am (See Program for Room)

    (Joint Program: Clinical Electrophysiology and Wound Management, Neurology)

    Speakers: Brady Whetten, PT, DPT, Mike Studer, PT, MS, NCS, CEEAA

    Level:  Advanced

    Peripheral neuropathy is a common condition affecting millions of people, especially older adults. Functional limitations from this condition are significant and can greatly affect individuals' safety and quality of life. Inactivity and its resultant sequelae of negative effects is a common result of this condition. The functional implications of and cost of care for neuropathy are significant and have major bearings on the health care system. The speakers will share the current evidence in treating neuropathy and use both descriptive and video case studies to demonstrate treatment options. In addition, the presentation will include novel applications of evidence-based management for various forms of neuropathy. A primary focus will be on the functional outcome areas of strength, endurance, gait speed, and balance with a physiologic underpinning of somatosensory reweighting. The presenters will clearly refute the notion that patients with neuropathy are unable to improve and describe an approach using standardized activity-based and participation-specific (quality of life) outcome measures consistent with the International Classification of Function (ICF). Finally, the role of PT in lifelong wellness will be discussed and proven as a value-added and successfully reimbursed intervention.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Understand the physiology of impairment and recovery in various subtypes of neuropathy.
    • Apply evidence-based interventions leading to the functional recovery of patients with neuropathy.
    • Prescribe and accurately individualize programs for strength, endurance, gait speed, balance, and dual tasking for patients with neuropathy.
    • Select appropriate outcome measures for patients with neuropathy.
    • Identify missing links in the evidence for neuropathy, areas requiring more research.

    Walking Speed: A Vital Sign and Even More

    Time: 10:30 am-12:30 pm (See Program for Room)

    (Joint Program: Acute Care, Neurology)

    Speakers: Michelle Lusardi, PT, DPT, PhD, Kevin Chui, PT, PhD, Kay Wing, PT, Jennifer E. Stevens-Lapsley, PT, PhD, Stacy L. Fritz, PT, PhD, Kathryn K. Brewer, PT, MEd, GCS, CEEAA, Douglas Bidelspach, PT

    Level: Intermediate

    Every patient with mobility dysfunction is concerned about their ability to walk; much of physical therapy intervention targets this essential functional task. This presentation will synthesize the best available evidence about walking speed as a vital sign and as an outcome measure. The speakers will explore self-selected walking speed (SSWS) as a vital sign for overall health and for safe function in complex environments. SSWS provides information about risk of functional decline, falls, and fractures; it is also an effective predictor of length of stay in acute care and rehabilitation settings. Knowledge of norms for SSWS across the lifespan can be a powerful guide for clinical decision making and for documentation. Knowledge of the clinometric properties of SSWS is key to evaluating the efficacy of intervention. Case studies will highlight the use of SSWS in physical therapy care for older adults recovering from stroke, total knee replacement, and hip fracture, as well as older persons coping with frailty and chronic disease. An interactive panel discussion will address the benefits and challenges of incorporating SSWS as a key measure in physical therapist practice.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Discuss the rationale for and importance of using SSWS as a vital sign for function.
    • Employ a strategy for examination of SSWS that will be feasible to integrate in your particular clinical practice setting.
    • Develop a plan of action to incorporate measurement of SSWS into routine physical therapy examination.
    • Identify key clinometric properties of walking speed as a measure of current function, outcome measure, and predictor of future function in your patient population.

    Physical Therapy for Boomers: Is the Academy Preparing and Motivating Students for Working With Older Adults?

    Time: 3:30 pm-5:30 pm (See Program for Room)

    (Joint Program: Education)

    Speakers: Debbie A. Ingram, PT, EdD, Corrie Odom, John Barr, PT, PhD, Rita Wong, PT, EdD, Jody Gandy, PT, DPT, PhD, Mike Reams, PT, MS, Nate Thomas, PT, DPT, Myla Quiben PT

    Level: Basic

    Physical therapy professional education includes clinical education experiences that prepare all students for management of patients across the lifespan and continuum of care. The exponential increase in older adults living in our society requires more entry-level physical therapists who are trained and motivated to work with geriatric patients. The population data provides compelling rationale for physical therapy education programs to place a greater emphasis on preparing and motivating students for working in senior continuous and long-term care communities. However, educators and long-term care facilities will need to overcome restrictive reimbursement practices coupled with students' disdain for clinical rotations in such settings. Health care entities that provide physical therapy services for older adults face enormous challenges related to reimbursement and identifying and hiring PTs and PTAs who are motivated to seek employment in their settings. Both the learning community and practice community must identify strategies for increasing the new professional's interest in working with geriatric patients in both inpatient and outpatient settings.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Describe the physical therapy personnel shortages in senior and long-term care settings.
    • Examine how academic and clinical education curricula prepare physical therapist and physical therapist assistant students for working with older adults.
    • Identify strategies for increasing the number of clinical education rotations in geriatric wellness and health care settings.
    • Develop partnerships with geriatric rehabilitation service providers to make attractive clinical education opportunities available for physical therapist and physical therapist assistant students.
    • Explore ways to motivate physical therapist and physical therapist assistant students to consider employment in settings that provide health care for geriatric patients.

    Friday, February 10

    Design and Implementation of a Large, System-Wide Osteoporosis and Bone Health Rehabilitation Program

    Time: 8:00 am-10:00 am (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Maribeth Gibbon, Michele A. Hribar, PT, BS, Mark Lundblad, PT, MPH, OCS, Mary Saloka Morrison, PT, DScPT, MHS, Jennifer Ochi, PT

    Level: Intermediate

    In 2008 several groups of therapists within the Cleveland Clinic Health System began to meet as a committee to unify their efforts in osteoporosis management. The major goal of the committee was for all therapists to provide a consistent and safe evaluation and plan of care to the patient with osteoporosis and low bone density as a primary or secondary diagnosis across the Cleveland Clinic Health System. In June 2010 a core group of therapists were trained to present to their colleagues a 3-hour CEU course covering the treatment and evaluation of osteoporosis and low bone density. By March 2011, 500-plus rehabilitation providers completed the training. This session presents a model on the creation and implementation of a program for a large, multi-site health care system. The design specifically illustrates an osteoporosis and bone health rehabilitation program approach that can be applied to other physical therapy diagnoses.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Explain the steps necessary to create a diagnosis-specific program for osteoporosis and bone health.
    • Identify clinical program requirements specific to the prevention of disabilities and improvement of impairments related to osteoporosis and bone health through standardization of examination/assessment, objective measures, prognosis, planning, and guidelines for appropriate interventions.
    • Describe the training process, including the use of technology and the incorporation of didactics and lab material emphasizing evidence-based practice.
    • Discuss the development of community education programs, including the role of marketing.
    • Identify the benefits to the organization as a whole and to its stakeholders.

    There Is an App for That? Use of Technology in Geriatric Physical Therapy Practice

    Time: 10:30 am-12:30 pm (See Program for Room)

    (Joint Program: Health Policy and Administration)

    Speakers: Melanie Desumma, PT, MSPT, Heather Fletcher, PT, DPT, Matt Weber, PT, DPT

    Level: Basic

    PDAs, iPads, smart phones, and other forms of technology are making their way into physical therapy practice. Use of new technology, even in geriatrics, is possible via knowledge of and familiarity with relevant applications. This session is designed to increase your technological awareness for immediate application in the clinical setting. A discussion of case studies that incorporate applications from initial evaluation through discharge will follow a review of new devices and applications. The presenters will describe how technology can assist with clinical decision making, enhance patient outcomes through evidence-based practice, and foster carryover after discharge.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Describe new technology and the models for incorporating it into everyday use by the patient/client and physical therapy practitioner.
    • Discuss the use of technology in medication review and pharmacology.
    • Identify applications that can help the clinician translate evidence into practice.
    • Discuss how incorporating technology may improve carryover of treatments into a home exercise program.
    • Employ smart phone technology for immediate calculation of outcome measures and for evidence-based clinical answers.

    *Evidenced-based Health Promotion, Community Collaboration, and Physical Therapy

    Time: 3:30 pm-5:30 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Margaret Kaniewski, MPH, Lori Schrodt, Terry Shea, Tiffany E. Shubert

    Level: Basic

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Administration on Aging, and state departments of public health are not common partners in physical therapy practice. These organizations, however, can offer innovative partnerships for physical therapy professionals to maximize client outcomes. Senior centers are now mandated to offer evidence-based health promotion programs (EBHP), including several that focus on health management, exercise, and falls prevention. In 2012, the CDC will disseminate 3 evidence-based falls prevention programs. Research indicates a minimum of 50 hours of balance exercise is needed for effective falls prevention, which is often challenging for clinical practices. PTs who partner with community organizations to offer EBHP can help their clients achieve this minimum exercise recommendation. As the CDC disseminates these programs, PTs need to know what an EBHP is, how to partner in program delivery and client referral, and the role of physical therapy in long-term falls preventionThis educational session provides an overview of public health initiatives around health promotion and falls prevention, an understanding of the EBHP available, integration of EBHP with clinical services, and a community partnership toolkit to create a continuum of care.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Define key components of an evidence-based health promotion program.
    • Describe recognized evidence-based health promotion programs for health management.
    • Discuss the 3 falls prevention programs (Tai Chi Moving for Better Balance, Stepping On, the Otago Exercise Program) to be disseminated by the CDC.
    • Describe initiatives and resources at the national, state, and local levels to disseminate evidence-based health promotion programs.
    • Discuss effective partnership models between physical therapy clinicians and community providers.
    • Develop an action plan to incorporate evidence-based health promotion into physical therapy practice.

    Geriatric Student Forum

    Time: 3:30 pm-5:30 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speaker: Becky Olson-Kellogg, PT, DPT, GCS

    Level: Basic

    This session provides students with an explanation of changes that occur in strength, balance, and physical activity as a person ages, and the PT's role in working with older adults. The speaker will delineate the valuable resources the Geriatric Section has available for members' use.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Describe the impact of our aging population and the opportunities this presents to our profession.
    • Recognize that the principles of strength training and balance training are only minimally altered for older adults.
    • Develop effective exercise programs suitable for most clinical setting that focus on strength, function, and mobility in older adults.
    • Discuss how pursuing additional training in geriatrics after graduation (through CE courses, residency programs, and the clinical specialty exam) will benefit your clinical practice in most settings.

    Autonomous Practice in Physical Therapy: What Does This Mean to Me?

    Time: 3:30 pm-5:30 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Jennifer Blackwood, PT, MPT, GCS, Tamara N. Gravano, PT, DPT, GCS, Jason Hardage, PT, DScPT, GCS, NCS, Greg W. Hartley, PT, DPT, Jill Heitzman, PT, DPT, GCS, CWS, CEEAA, FACCWS, Joe Libera, PT, DPT, MPH, GCS, Kenneth L. Miller, PT, DPT, Stacey Zeigler, PT, DPT

    Level: Multiple Level

    This session addresses the role that autonomy plays in current physical therapist practice. Presenters will discuss the benefits and barriers to being an autonomous practitioner across a variety of practice settings while using the valuable resources of other health care practitioners. An emphasis on autonomous practice in geriatric physical therapy will be addressed, but relevance for other specialty areas will be included. Differences between being an autonomous practitioner and having direct access will be implemented throughout this session to enhance the understanding of the 2 concepts. Participants will discuss and apply the concepts addressed in this session to clinical case scenarios.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Define "autonomous practice" according to the APTA Vision Statement for Physical Therapy 2020.
    • Describe models of autonomous practice in geriatric physical therapy across various practice settings and within other specialty areas of physical therapist practice.
    • Discuss the impact of autonomous practice o current physical therapy practice.
    • Apply concepts related to autonomous practice to clinical practice using relevant case studies.

    American Board of Physical Therapy Specialties (ABPTS): Enhancing Professional Development Through Certification

    Time: 3:30 pm-5:30 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speaker: Mark Weber, PT, PhD, SCS, ATC

    Level: Basic

    The APTA specialist certification program can open up new doors for you as a professional. By becoming a board-certified clinical specialist, you can gain the formal recognition you deserve for your knowledge, experience, and skills. This forum is open to all individuals who wish to learn more about the specialist certification program, including eligibility requirements and the professional and personal benefits of becoming a board-certified clinical specialist. Following a brief overview of the specialist certification program, you will have an opportunity to speak with members of ABPTS and the specialty councils and to get answers to your questions about the certification process.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Describe the specialist certification program and process.
    • Describe the minimum eligibility requirements for specialist certification.
    • List the current areas of specialty practice.
    • Describe the role of clinical residencies in the certification process.
    • Identify top motivations to pursue specialist certification.

    Saturday, February 11

    Polypharmacy in the Geriatric Client: What Does It Mean to My Clinical Practice?

    Time: 8:00 am-10:00 am (See Program for Room)

    Speaker: Suzanne L. Tinsley, PT, PhD, NCS, Marie Vazquez-Morgan, PT, PhD

    Level: Intermediate

    Many patients/clients being referred to physical therapy are taking multiple prescriptions and/or over-the-counter medications. Although many of these medications are directly related to their rehabilitation diagnosis, some may not be. This may be due to the larger number of coexisting pathophysiologies in our patient/client population, especially the elderly. Drug-associated adverse events range from 5-35% in the older adult. What should you know about polypharmacy and clinical pharmacology to manage these patients effectively? As the physical therapy profession progresses toward independent practice, the physical therapist must increase their understanding of how pharmacotherapeutics, ie, drug therapy, can impact functional outcomes. By having a comprehensive understanding of adverse drug effects, the physical therapist will be able to make changes in the rehabilitation program and recognize the need for referrals and/or rehabilitation team conferences. Using case studies and reviewing the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) model, the speaker will address changes that may be present in patient/client populations as a result of adverse drug reactions due to polypharmacy.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Describe the primary pharmacokinetic factors involved in drug therapy (drug administration, absorption, distribution, interaction, and elimination).
    • Explain how altered pharmacokinetics may lead to a decrease or an increase in drug effects, and how these effects may be recognized in geriatric patients/clients receiving therapy.
    • Identify the general categories, mechanisms of action, risk-benefit ratio, and implications on rehabilitative interventions for the pharmacological agents routinely prescribed for conditions involving the cardiopulmonary/vascular, neuromuscular, and central nervous systems in the geriatric population.
    • Identify the possible effects of polypharmacy and various drug interactions on the effectiveness of rehabilitative interventions and functional outcomes in the geriatric patient/client.

    *OVER CAPACITY -- Exercise Adherence in Older Adults: Why Don't My Patients Do Their Exercises and Can I Improve This?

    Time: 10:30 am-12:30 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Anne Shumway-Cook, PhD, Patricia N. Matsuda, PhD

    Level: Basic

    Despite overwhelming evidence demonstrating the importance of exercise to improving balance, mobility, and functional independence-adherence to prescribed exercise programs remains low across many patient groups, especially among older adults. The social ecological model presents a framework for understanding individual and environmental determinants of exercise adherence. The speakers will define adherence within physical therapy and discuss research evidence exploring individual and environmental determinants of exercise adherence in older adults. In addition, the speakers will present clinical strategies to assess and improve exercise adherence based on a social ecological model.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Define adherence and review adherence rates to exercise and physical activity in older adults.
    • Describe a social ecological model of adherence to exercise.
    • Discuss research exploring individual and environmental factors affecting exercise adherence in older adults and clinical strategies to improve and assess adherence.

    Resistance Training Through Adulthood

    Time: 3:30 pm-5:30 pm (See Program for Room)

    (Joint Program: Sports Physical Therapy)

    Speakers: Jaynie Bjornaraa, PT, PhD, MPH, SCS, ATC, CSCS, Terry Grindstaff, PT, PhD, SCS, ATC, CSCS

    Level: Multiple Level

    This course will provide the attendee with basic and advanced resistance-training concepts applicable to the general population, including exercise prescription/considerations, resistance-training techniques, Olympic lifts, plyometrics, speed, and agility concepts. Age groups of focus will include adults to age 64 and seniors 65 and older. The speaker will address specific considerations for the senior population in detail regarding basic and advanced resistance-training concepts from an evidence-based perspective. In addition, physiologic and psychosocial aspects unique to the senior population will be discussed and integrated within programming concepts. Gender differences also will be a topic of interest within this course.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Describe exercise program design principles, including training methods and modes, exercise selection, exercise order, load assignment, training volume, rest periods, training frequency, and periodization.
    • Use program variables concepts when designing an exercise program for an adult or elderly client/patient.
    • Discuss exercise modifications and recommendations for healthy and injured seniors and adults, including descriptions of proper exercise technique.
    • Describe the unique physiologic and psychosocial aspects for the senior populations, including safety, benefits, risks, concerns, and efficacy based on scientific evidence.
    • State 3 gender differences that occur when training adults and elderly patients/clients.
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