Archive: CSM 2012: Health Policy and Administration Programming

  • This is archived programming for CSM 2012. See current programming.

    Browse Health Policy and Administration sessions by day. Return to the main topic menu.

    Tuesday, February 7 | Wednesday, February 8 | Thursday, February 9 | Friday, February 10 | Saturday, February 11 

    * Should you choose to preselect sessions during the registration process, please be advised that preselection is not a guarantee of a seat. Attendees are asked to preselect to better determine room size and all efforts will be made to accommodate sessions in the largest rooms possible. All attendees are encouraged to show up to sessions early. Attendees are also encouraged to select alternative sessions in the event their first choice is full. 

    Tuesday, February 7 (Preconference)

    Lead Wherever You Are: Becoming a Personal Leader, Part 1

    Time: 8:00 am-5:30 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Jennifer Wilson, Stacey Zeigler, PT, DPT, Craig Moore, Karen Mueller, PT, PhD, Kerry Wood, PT, DPT

    Level: Multiple Level

    Preconference Pricing: Standard (2 Day) 

    CEUs: 1.5 (15 contact hours/CCUs)

    This course is the first in a series of leadership courses and other applied learning activities intended to develop leadership skills and professionalism in physical therapists. Evidence shows that leadership can be developed and that developing leadership skills is an integral part of professional development in physical therapist practice. This course emphasizes the development of new leadership behaviors-behaviors that foster autonomous practice, accountability, professional values, diversity, and ethics. The speakers will discuss how to influence others to achieve shared goals, build better relationships and networks, resolve conflicts, negotiate effectively, and identify the value and differences between leadership coaching and mentoring. Participants are required to complete a leadership self-assessment and other preparatory work prior to the start of the course.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Identify and discuss the personal characteristics of an effective leader.
    • Recognize the importance of values and ethics and their impact on personal leadership and professionalism.
    • Given a case scenario, select appropriate leadership styles and actions.
    • Generate examples of leadership behaviors to influence, align, and empower others.
    • Recognize energy management actions to set priorities and delegate.
    • Describe varying characteristics of a diverse workforce (eg, generational, cultural, and gender differences).
    • Formulate effective responses to conflicts in a variety of situations.
    • Develop personalized professional development plans with timelines.

    Wednesday, February 8 (Preconference)

    Lead Wherever You Are: Becoming a Personal Leader, Part 2

    Time: 8:00 am-5:30 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Jennifer Wilson, Stacey Zeigler, PT, DPT, Craig Moore, Karen Mueller, PT, PhD, Kerry Wood, PT, DPT

    Level: Multiple Level

    Preconference Pricing: Standard (2 Day) 

    CEUs: 1.5 (15 contact hours/CCUs)

    This course is the first in a series of leadership courses and other applied learning activities intended to develop leadership skills and professionalism in physical therapists. Evidence shows that leadership can be developed and that developing leadership skills is an integral part of professional development in physical therapist practice. This course emphasizes the development of new leadership behaviors-behaviors that foster autonomous practice, accountability, professional values, diversity, and ethics. The speakers will discuss how to influence others to achieve shared goals, build better relationships and networks, resolve conflicts, negotiate effectively, and identify the value and differences between leadership coaching and mentoring. Participants are required to complete a leadership self-assessment and other preparatory work prior to the start of the course.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Identify and discuss the personal characteristics of an effective leader.
    • Recognize the importance of values and ethics and their impact on personal leadership and professionalism.
    • Given a case scenario, select appropriate leadership styles and actions.
    • Generate examples of leadership behaviors to influence, align, and empower others.
    • Recognize energy management actions to set priorities and delegate.
    • Describe varying characteristics of a diverse workforce (eg, generational, cultural, and gender differences).
    • Formulate effective responses to conflicts in a variety of situations.
    • Develop personalized professional development plans with timelines.

    Thursday, February 9

    Physical Therapists Impacting Health Policy Through Health Services Research: A Survival Strategy for Health Care Reform, Part 1

    Time: 8:00 am-10:00 am (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Daniel Pinto, PT, DPT, OCS, FAAOMPT, Peter McMenamin, PT, MS, OCS, Anthony Delitto, PT, PhD, FAPTA, Justin Moore, PT, DPT, Marc Goldstein, EdD, Janet Freburger, PT, PhD

    Level: Intermediate

    This is Part 1 of a 2-part session. The physical therapy profession has been engaged in serious health policy issues since its inception. Leaders of the profession have long urged for PTs and physical therapy researchers to engage in the policy debate with all tools available. The current economic reality and the demands of looming health care reforms require, more than ever, the urgent concentration of our profession's resources and best minds on issues of health policy and health services research. Part 1 of this program will review the history of the profession's health policy initiatives and address ways to impact policy, including comparative effectiveness research, health services research, and economic evaluation methods. Current APTA initiatives and strategies related to these areas of research will be described and related to the context of health care reform.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Understand the role of health policy in the past, present, and future evolution of the physical therapy profession.
    • Explain the basic concepts of economic evaluations and how they can impact health policy.
    • Discuss examples of policy relevant research currently impacting practice.

    Accountable Care Organizations: What Physical Therapists Need to Know

    Time: 8:00 am-10:00 am (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Gayle Lee, JD, Roshunda Drummond-Dye, JD

    Level: Intermediate

    Starting January 1, 2012, Medicare will reimburse entities referred to as accountable care organizations, or ACOs, that are aimed at promoting quality health care, coordinating care, and saving costs. These ACOs will share in the savings derived from the coordinated care and will significantly impact the American health care delivery and payment systems for years to come. In this session, attendees will learn about ACO structure; the requirements that an ACO must meet related to quality; and how physical therapists can find out more about ACOs in their local community and participate as an ACO provider, as well as a non-ACO provider.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Identify the requirements to be an ACO under the Medicare program.
    • Promote your practice to an ACO.
    • Determine whether participation in an ACO would be beneficial to your practice.
    • Understand the rules governing ACOs with regard to payment, quality, antitrust, and anti-kickback laws.

    Physical Therapists Impacting Health Policy Through Health Services Research: A Survival Strategy for Health Care Reform, Part 2

    Time: 10:30 am-12:00 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Daniel Pinto, PT, DPT, OCS, FAAOMPT, Peter McMenamin, PT, MS, OCS, Anthony Delitto, PT, PhD, FAPTA, Justin Moore, PT, DPT, Marc Goldstein, EdD, Janet Freburger, PT, PhD

    Level: Intermediate

    This is Part 2 of a 2-part session. The physical therapy profession has been engaged in serious health policy issues since its inception. Leaders of the profession have long urged for PTs and physical therapy researchers to engage in the policy debate with all tools available. The current economic reality and the demands of looming health care reforms require, more than ever, the urgent concentration of our profession's resources and best minds on issues of health policy and health services research. In Part 2, the speakers will continue to discuss the relationship between health care reform and health services research initiatives. Physical therapists currently engaged in health services research will summarize their work to date and discuss future directions and imperatives for physical therapy. Concrete suggestions will be made regarding the profession's continuing pursuit of policy-relevant research as an essential component of our future development and success.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Discuss examples of policy-relevant research currently impacting practice.
    • Identify key areas of physical therapy health policy and practice that need a health services research focus.
    • Use suggestions for promoting and advancing physical therapy through participating in research and advocacy.

    Anatomy of a Clinical Competency Program for Rehabilitation Professionals

    Time: 10:30 am-12:30 pm (See Program for Room)

    (Joint Program: Education)

    Speakers: Julia G. Tilley, PT, DPT, MSEd, Bradley A. King, PT, DScPT, MA

    Level: Intermediate

    Clinical competence in the health care environment is necessary to protect the public and promote patient safety. Historically, competence in health care was established through education, initial licensure testing, a professional code of ethics, workplace orientation, and continuing education. There is growing concern that this process is inadequate. Public agencies, professional societies, and accreditation organizations all have identified the need for ongoing competency assessment or continuing competence. Challenges of ongoing competency assessment include how competence is defined and assessed, determination of who is responsible to make these assessments, and what elements of performance are assessed. While many have attempted to define clinical competence, no common understanding exists. Similarly, there is no agreement regarding who is responsible for competence assessment. Equally difficult is determining what and how to assess it in order to ensure that health care personnel have the skills and capability to provide safe, effective care. Participants will explore a clinical competency assessment program for therapy services staff. Topics to be covered include: designing a competency program; identification, development, and deployment of competency assessments at work unit and department levels; and tools and processes to use from the initial stages of competency development through program evaluation.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Describe the forces influencing ongoing therapy staff competency assessment.
    • Recall the vision and philosophy supporting a robust staff competency program.
    • Recognize the key components of staff competency program.
    • Formulate how to implement a competency program for therapy services.

    Emerging Trends in Private Insurance and Workers' Compensation

    Time: 10:30 am-12:30 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Karen Jost, PT, MS, Carmen Elliott, MS

    Level: Basic

    This course will identify trends and issues in the private and workers' compensation insurance industries. It will advance your knowledge on a full range of topics, including managed care industry trends, value-based insurance design, employer benefit design, consumer-driven health plans, and much more. You will learn the most current information related to private and workers' compensation insurance coverage and gain an upper hand to address these important health insurance topics.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Identify payment trends in the private health care and workers' compensation insurance markets.
    • Prepare for challenges in the private insurance market after health care reform.
    • Identify payment changes in moving health care payment away from the current fee-for-service system towards value-based payment.

    PT Issues in the Statehouse: From POPTS and Infringement to Direct Access and Scope of Practice

    Time: 3:30 pm-5:00 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Justin Elliott, Angela Chasteen

    Level: Basic

    From Albany to Sacramento, Tallahassee to Cheyenne-state legislatures across the country are the battlegrounds to advance PT practice as well as defend the profession against infringement. Come hear what the hot issues are in the states, as well what types of legislation the physical therapy profession is advocating for and against in our fight to make Vision 2020 a reality.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Identify at least 3 issues that are currently being considered by state legislatures.

    Maximize Your Leadership Impact Here, Near, and Far: Yourself, Your Organization, and Your Profession

    Time: 3:30 pm-5:30 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: R. Scott Ward, PT, PhD, James E. Hughes, PT, John D. Barnes, Marilyn Moffat, PT, DPT, PhD, CSCS, CEEAA, FAPTA, Jan K. Richardson, PT, PhD, OCS, Robert W. Richardson, PT, MEd, FAPTA

    Level: Basic

    In the spirit of Chicago, home of Oprah's Book Club, this course will implement a book club format as the main teaching strategy. Discussion of the books will highlight how to improve your leadership skills so that you can maximize your impact for yourself (Here), your organization (Near), and your profession (Far). Prominent APTA leaders will facilitate small-group discussion of the books and take part in a moderated panel discussion. Preselected books are: Good to Great (Collins, 2001), Leadership from the Inside Out (Cashman, 2008), and Six Disciplines Execution Revolution (Harpst, 2008). While reading one or more of the preselected books will lend to richer discussions, everyone is welcome and can participate in this unique learning experience.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Identify behaviors that help make leaders more effective.
    • Discover leadership principles that are used by recognized leaders.
    • Identify the leadership skills that you need to improve in order to effectively impact where you presently serve.
    • Apply leadership skills more effectively.
    • Recognize resources that are available to help you improve your leadership impact.

    Using a 3-Level Model of Communication for Team Building, Effective Patient Alliances, and Organizational Change

    Time: 3:30 pm-5:30 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speaker: Karen Mueller, PT, PhD

    Level: Multiple Level

    Recent evidence suggests that successful and productive physical therapists utilize a 3-level, inside-out approach to communication. The first of these is internal communication, the mindful intrapersonal dialog affecting mood, outlook, and self-efficacy. The second is external communication, the interpersonal dialog that involves effective use of social, emotional, and cultural intelligence to build alliances needed for effective team function and therapeutic partnership. The last level is instrumental communication, involving the ability to teach, motivate, negotiate, and advocate for positive change at all levels of influence. This presentation will provide evidence as well as tools for self-assessment and skill application at each level. Attendees will learn methods for using the inside-out model as a framework for teaching and reinforcing communication skills in physical therapy education programs.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Discuss the following evidence-based dimensions of internal communication: mindfulness, explanatory style, self-talk, outlook, and intrinsic motivation.
    • Examine the following evidence-based dimensions of external communication: emotional and social intelligence, assertiveness, empathy, and effective alliances with patients and colleagues.
    • Analyze the following evidence-based dimensions of instrumental communication: negotiation and collaborative conflict resolution, effective teaching, and promoting positive health behavior change in a clinical context.
    • Apply evidence-based strategies for assessing and optimizing internal, external, and instrumental communication.
    • Apply the elements of the inside-out model of communication to professional and interprofessional team building.

    Friday, February 10

    Chief, Section, Assembly Delegate Meeting

    Time: 8:00 am-10:00 am (See Program for Room)

    This session is designed to improve the governance of the association.

    Five Clinic Models for Pro Bono Service

    Time: 8:00 am-10:00 am (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Jill B. Lattanzi, PT, EdD, Kerstin M. Palombaro, PhD, Lynn English, PT, DPT, MSEd, Anne Kloos, PT, PHD, NCS, Sarah Wenger, PT, DPT, E. S. Euype, PT, DPT, OCS, Marka Gehrig, PT, MPT

    Level: Basic

    This session presents 5 different clinic models for pro bono physical therapy service, including a description of the model, facilitators and barriers to start-up and sustainability, and outcomes and vision for future growth. All models involve students, faculty, physical therapy professionals, and community partners in various ways. Models range from commuinty-based interdisciplinary clinics to freestanding physical therapy clinics. The session includes time for discussion.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Describe 5 different models for engaging students, faculty, physical therapy professionals, and community in a pro bono clinic.
    • Identify the various facilitators and barriers to start-up and sustainability for the different models of pro bono service.
    • Determine strategies for outcome measures, growth, and sustainable, community-centered practice.

    The ICF and Physical Therapy 10 Years Later, Part 1

    Time: 8:00 am-10:00 am (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Reuben Escorpizo, PT, DPT, MSc, Anita Bemis-Dougherty, PT, DPT, MAS, Todd E. Davenport, PT, DPT, OCS, Harry Feliciano, MD, MPH, Daniel Vreeman, PT, DPT, MSc, Daniel L. Riddle, PT, PhD, FAPTA

    Level: Multiple Level

    It has been 10 years since the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) was endorsed by the WHO in May 2001. This session updates you on the current use of the ICF in physical therapy clinical practice and research. The ICF was intended to describe the functioning of a person at the individual and societal levels, in light of a health condition. The ICF also focuses on contextual factors, namely the environment and personal factors. Part 1 first provides an overview of the ICF, reviews current literature since its endorsement, and discusses the impact of the ICF on physical therapy in the United States. Next, the session reviews APTA's response to the ICF, including revisions of the Guide to Physical Therapist Practice, and the perspectives of third-party payers. It concludes with a discussion of the feasibility, benefits, and challenges of implementing the ICF for busy clinicians.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Evaluate literature on the use of the ICF in physical therapy practice and research.
    • Define how the ICF has been integrated in the revision of the Guide to Physical Therapist Practice.

    Working With Cultural Differences in Patient Care

    Time: 10:30 am-11:30 am (See Program for Room)

    Speaker: Renee Cordrey, PT, MSPT, MPH, CWS

    Level: Basic

    Physical therapists frequently encounter patients from cultures other than their own. These differences may create challenges in providing care. Understanding how to respectfully and appropriately interact with these patients is critical to better the clinical relationship and improve outcomes. PTs should acknowledge that when the patient has a different set of beliefs than the PT, the patient also views the PTs beliefs as foreign. The PT must make an effort to span that difference to find common goals and a plan of care acceptable to both individuals. It is worth noting that there is great variability even within cultures, though some beliefs and practices are common among members. This session focuses on recognizing individual traits, rather than the collective traits of a given culture, to allow clinicians to work with patients from a variety of backgrounds. Through the use of cases, the presenter will use Levin's ETHNIC (Explanation Treatment Healers Negotiate Intervention Collaboration) approach to identify ways to work with patients who come from a culture different from the clinician.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Recognize when a there is a difference in culture in order to address it.
    • Apply the ETHNIC pneumonic to bridging the cultural differences.

    The ICF and Physical Therapy 10 Years Later, Part 2

    Time: 10:30 am-12:00 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speaker: Reuben Escorpizo, PT, DPT, MSc

    Level: Multiple Level

    It has been 10 years since the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) was endorsed by the WHO in May 2001. This session updates you on the current use of the ICF in physical therapy clinical practice and research. The ICF was intended to describe the functioning of a person at the individual and societal levels, in light of a health condition. The ICF also focuses on contextual factors, namely the environment and personal factors. Part 2 of the session demonstrates the research and clinical utility of the ICF and how practitioners and, ultimately, patients can benefit from it. Presentations will include the weaknesses of the ICF when used in the clinic and discuss possible ways to remedy these limitations. Finally, presenters will explain how they envision the future of the ICF in physical therapy practice and research in the United States. Questions to answer include: What are the challenges and opportunities of integrating the ICF in physical therapy practice and research? What is the future apt to be like in the emerging areas of health informatics and electronic patient documentation? What will the future hold for the integration of the ICF in physical therapy educational curricula? What role can the ICF play in conducting trials in physical therapy interventions?

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Illustrate ways of demonstrating how the ICF can be useful in physical therapy practice and research.
    • Describe the future works and trends on how to optimize the use of the ICF to advance physical therapy practice and research.

    Emerging Issues in Medicare and Regulatory Activity

    Time: 10:30 am-12:30 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Gayle Lee, JD, Roshunda Drummond-Dye, JD

    Level: Intermediate

    New Medicare regulations, manual revisions, the therapy cap, the 2012 physician fee schedule, pay for performance, local coverage determinations, enrollment changes, and implementation of Medicare provisions in health care reform are just a few of the many federal actions that will affect how you practice. This session provides you with the most current information related to Medicare coverage and paymentt policies and other pertinent new regulations that affect your practice. Make sure to stay informed, as these rules affect everyone.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Adapt your practice to comply with Medicare regulations.
    • Identify the physician fee schedule rates and potential changes to reimbursement.
    • Minimize the risk of audits.
    • Recognize compliance issues associated with current rules and regulations and incorporate them in your practice.
    • Minimize denials by understanding payment policies.
    • Adapt your practice to comply with new Medicare provisions stemming from the Accountable Care Act.

    Financial Information for Component Leaders

    Time: 3:30 pm-5:00 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speaker: Rob Batarla, MBA

    Level: Intermediate

    APTA's treasurer and CFO, along with members of the APTA Finance and Audit Committee, present current and relevant information in the world of nonprofit finance. In this session you will be able to network with other component treasurers and executives, and meet the treasurer and Finance Committee members in order to have them as contacts for future questions related to nonprofit finance.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Identify and manage current issues such as investments, audits, and taxes.

    Preparing for Medical Review: Auditing Your Documentation

    Time: 3:30 pm-5:30 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speaker: Holly Hester, PT, MPT

    Level: Intermediate

    The best defense when faced with medical review, denials, and payment recovery is clean billing and comprehensive and supportive documentation. Internal audit is a critical part of the therapy department's compliance plan related to medical review and denial prevention. During pre- and post-payment review, therapy documentation is reviewed to determine if services delivered were covered, coded correctly, and reasonable and necessary to treat the patient's condition. This session reviews the nuts and bolts of how physical therapists practicing in multiple venues can be proactive and successful under heightened medical review. It focuses on physical therapy documentation and billing and provides participants with practical tips and strategies for auditing records for accuracy and compliance with Medicare regulations as well as for preparing for a RAC audit or medical review. All topics and points discussed are consistent with those used by Fiscal Intermediaries (FIs), MACs and Comprehensive Error Rate Testing (CERT) contractors when reviewing submitted claims, and they are supported by Medicare Coverage Manuals as published by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS).

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Identify Medicare requirements for physical therapy documentation and billing.
    • Identify common errors and key elements of an audit program to prevent denials/recovery.
    • Review principles of effective documentation to support services delivered.

    Saturday, February 11

    Electronic Health Records: Health Care System Chicken Soup or Rotten Egg?

    Time: 8:00 am-10:00 am (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Daniel Vreeman, PT, DPT, Matt Elrod, PT, DPT, MEd, NCS, Robert Latz, PT, DPT, GCFP, Steven G. Wilkinson, PT, PhD

    Level: Basic

    You can love them or hate them, but you can't really ignore electronic health records (EHRs). Many people seem to think that they are the chicken soup for our ailing health care system. Physical therapists want electronic systems that improve clinical/administrative reporting capabilities and operational efficiency, and support benchmarking and clinical research. Despite the potential value and growing national incentives to adopt EHRs in health care, not everyone is convinced that EHRs are worth the cost and hassle. Using the best available evidence from the literature and the speakers' collective experience with electronic systems, course participants will help to illuminate the path toward using EHRs to make a meaningful difference for you, your organization, and your patients. The speakers will discuss the evidence for information technology improving the health care delivery system and the barriers to getting there; strategies and resources for choosing the right tools for the task (software and hardware); and some of the key pitfalls to avoid along the way. In addition, the speakers will review current literature, present findings from APTA initiatives, and case examples from clinical practice, followed by an interactive discussion of strategies for success.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Explain how federal initiatives and other forces are promoting the adoption of EHRs.
    • Appreciate the kinds of problems that can be improved with a more judicious use of health information technology.
    • Discuss the key factors for success and barriers to implementing EHRs.
    • Develop a self-assessment process to determine your readiness for EHR adoption.
    • Recognize key questions to ask a vendor when selecting an EHR to purchase.
    • Identify areas of practice and day-to-day operations that might be impacted by the transition to an EHR.
    • Identify resources for adopting EHRs.

    Leading Chaos: Harnessing the Power of Disorganization to You and Your Patients' Advantage

    Time: 8:00 am-10:00 am (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Stacey Zeigler, PT, DPT, Claire Richardson, OTR/L, OTD

    Level: Basic

    In the current environment of having less resources but needing to provide more services, chaos may feel like the dominant situation. Rather than becoming swallowed up by this scenario, a fresh perspective can help to reframe the potential outcomes. An understanding and application of both leadership and nonlinear dynamic systems theory can provide an alternative viewpoint with regard to the treatment process for all patient populations and can also be applied to the day-to-day operations for all practice environments. By the end of this engaging and interactive course, you will be able to apply nonlinear dynamic systems theory to enhance patient outcomes and turn the natural chaos in your practice into an advantage. You also will walk away with an action plan for taking the lead in immediately applying these concepts.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Recognize the natural chaos occurring in the environment and the need for personal leadership skill application.
    • Discuss nonlinear dynamic systems theory (NLD) as an alternative viewpoint to traditionally held models of patient learning and practice.
    • Apply NLD concepts to your patient/client population and practice environment.
    • Create a personal action plan for fostering your ability to lead chaos.

    What You Wear to Work: Appropriate Attire for Our Doctoring Profession

    Time: 8:00 am-10:00 am (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Janice Kuperstein, PT, PhD, MSEd, Susan E. Roush, PT, PhD, Debbie A. Ingram, PT, EdD, Nancy Fell, PT, PhD, NCS

    Level: Multiple Level

    As physical therapy has transitioned to a doctoring profession, it is important to consider the effect of our attire on our patients. While the literature indicates that patients of other doctoring professions prefer more formal attire, the preferred attire for the physical therapists typically is more casual. This course will facilitate an important dialogue within the profession on how our patients and the public view physical therapists, and how that relates to the desired increased credibility of the profession.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Examine the evidence in the literature regarding professional attire.
    • Identify practical professional attire for physical therapy settings.
    • Appreciate the professional image (or lack thereof) portrayed when choosing clinic attire.

    An Interprofessional Academic-Community Partnership Addressing Health Disparities in Persons With Diabetes

    Time: 10:30 am-12:00 pm (See Program for Room)

    (Joint Program: Geriatrics)

    Speakers: Gina L. Pariser, PT, PhD, Patricia D. Gillette, PhD, Jillian Redlinger

    Level: Multiple Level

    Type II diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and its complications are a major cause of morbidity and mortality in the United States and contribute substantially to health care costs. Racial and ethnic minorities with diabetes have worse health outcomes than their white counterparts, leading to high rates of health inequities. Current evidence indicates that much of the morbidity secondary to T2DM can be prevented by engagement in diabetes self-management behaviors, including exercise. Unfortunately, many people with T2DM have co-existing chronic conditions, such as obesity, cardiovascular disease, and arthritis, which affect their mobility and, in turn, limit their capacity and ability to exercise safely. Over 70% of adults with diabetes and mobility impairments report that they do not achieve recommended amounts of exercise. The increased prevalence of co-existing chronic illnesses and mobility impairments in African Americans with diabetes contribute to the complexity of promoting exercise and managing diabetes in this population. In an attempt to address this disparity, the speakers developed and implemented a diabetes self-management education (DSME) and exercise program called Active Steps for Diabetes. Active Steps for Diabetes was developed through partnerships between a university and a metropolitan public health department. The program has been shown to be effective in increasing participants' daily physical activity, cardiovascular fitness, muscle strength and balance, and in improving their blood glucose control. Physical therapists are uniquely qualified to help individuals with T2DM and mobility disability increase their physical activity. DSME is usually provided by nurses and dieticians; however, the inclusion of physical therapists may help improve DSME outcomes.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Use evidence-based strategies for teaching medically underserved adults how to better manage their diabetes, focusing on cultural factors that affect consumers.
    • Implement strategies for helping medically underserved adults with T2DM, health comorbidities, and mobility disability in overcoming barriers to physical activity.
    • Perform evidence-based fitness assessments and administer exercise prescription for adults with T2DM and mobility impairments.
    • Develop effective interprofessional partnerships with local community agencies to serve racially and ethnically diverse citizens.

    Informatics Competencies in Physical Therapy Education: A Proposed Framework

    Time: 10:30 am-12:30 pm (See Program for Room)

    (Joint Program: Education)

    Speakers: Steven G. Wilkinson, PT, PhD, Daniel Vreeman, PT, DPT

    Level: Multiple Level

    The field of health informatics has emerged as an interdisciplinary science that evaluates how health information and knowledge can be effectively used for clinical decision making. Health care leaders have recognized informatics competencies as essential in other health care education programs, especially as a foundation for evidence-based practice; however, this has not been the case in physical therapy. Failing to prepare physical therapists and physical therapist assistants with technology competencies will hamper progress toward the profession's goals of fully availing clinicians of technologies that can facilitate more effective and efficient care. Because adopting health information technology is a top national priority, it is imperative to define and implement competencies to ensure that clinicians can continue to thrive in the emerging electronic infrastructure. The purpose of this course is to describe the current state of health informatics in physical therapy education, to describe published competencies in other health care disciplines, and to propose a framework of competencies to incorporate into physical therapy education.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Describe the current state of health informatics in physical therapy education.
    • Recognize informatics competencies prevalent in other health care disciplines.
    • Identify different levels of informatics competency for the physical therapy profession.
    • Discuss the informatics competencies necessary for clinicians to be effective in the emerging electronic age.

    Developing Leaders: A Model for Leadership Development in the Clinical Workplace

    Time: 3:30 pm-5:30 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speaker: Deborah J. Kucera, PT, MSPT

    Level: Multiple Level

    Regardless of practice setting in health care, there is growing focus on the importance of effective leadership on the success of teams, organizations, and communities. In rapidly changing environments, organizations with leaders interspersed at all levels are more likely to successfully adapt and realize positive outcomes. Leadership development must involve many employees versus just a select few, so that change and innovation can be driven from every level of the organization. The challenge becomes finding the time and resources to implement leadership development in already-busy work environments and financially challenging times. In this course, the speaker will review the process used to create and implement a model for leadership development in the clinical environment, illustrating the steps taken to gain stakeholder input, determine content and structure, and select participants. In addition, the speaker will discuss challenges in implementing such a program.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Describe strategies for determining effective structure and content in relation to the design of a leadership development program.
    • Describe ways to engage participants in a program to promote leadership development in a clinical setting.
    • Recognize important considerations to sustain "buy-in" in such a program during financially challenging times.

    Federal Laws and Regulations Affecting Pediatric Physical Therapy Practice: Current Status and What's Next From Congress

    Time: 3:30 pm-5:30 pm (See Program for Room)

    (Joint Program: Pediatrics)

    Speakers: Mary Jane K. Rapport, PT, DPT, PhD, Nate Thomas, PT, DPT

    Level: Multiple Level

    This course will be co-presented by the Section on Pediatrics Federal Affairs liaison and the associate director of APTA's Federal Government Affairs Department. The intent of the course is to highlight the connection between legislation and the delivery of pediatric physical therapy and discuss current federal legislation and how the actions of Congress ultimately guide our practice with children. As doctors of physical therapy and autonomous practitioners, we are expected to follow the regulations, policies, and procedures set forth through federal and state laws. Most pediatric physical therapists do not have the time or resources to remain current with the federal laws and regulations relevant to their practice, and this course offers an opportunity for them to receive this important information on laws such as IDEA, ESEA, Section 504, and PPACA.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Detail the process and timelines for establishing a federal law, including the accompanying regulations and reauthorization, using IDEA as an example.
    • Recognize the difference in eligibility for services under Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act and the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA).
    • Explain how federal laws may impact clinical decisions or service delivery for children who need physical therapy.
    • Detail the recent activities of the current Congress in moving legislation related to pediatric physical therapy forward.
    • Describe how APTA assists with federal legislative activities and actions related to pediatric physical therapy.
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