Archive: CSM 2012: Oncology Programming

  • This is archived programming for CSM 2012. See current programming.

    Browse Oncology sessions by day. Return to the main topic menu.

    Wednesday, February 8 | Thursday, February 9 | Friday, February 10 | Saturday, February 11 

    * Should you choose to preselect sessions during the registration process, please be advised that preselection is not a guarantee of a seat. Attendees are asked to preselect to better determine room size and all efforts will be made to accommodate sessions in the largest rooms possible. All attendees are encouraged to show up to sessions early. Attendees are also encouraged to select alternative sessions in the event their first choice is full. 

    Wednesday, February 8 (Preconference)

    Evidence in Action: A Comprehensive Management of Balance Impairments and Falls for Adult Cancer Survivors

    Time: 8:00 am-5:30 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Cindy A. Pfalzer, PhD, Jennifer Blackwood, PT, MPT, GCS, Amy Yorke, PT, MPT, NCS, Min-Hui Huang, PT, PhD, NCS

    Level: Intermediate

    Preconference Pricing: Standard 

    CEUs: 0.8 (8 contact hours/CCUs)

    Physical therapists commonly treat patients with cancer in all settings. This session will provide a review of balance disorders and falls in cancer survivors. Participants will be able to use patient histories and system reviews to identify cancer survivors who are at risk of a balance disorder. In addition, the speakers will emphasize the use of outcomes measures appropriate to the cancer population as part of the screening process and present an evidence-based approach to the examination and intervention of balance dysfunction and falls for cancer survivors. A multi-system approach to balance impairment and falls using valid outcomes measures will be discussed as part of the intervention, including physical therapy plan of care. The screening, examination, and intervention lab components of this course require active participation; attendees should be dressed to allow full movement.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Describe the unique and diverse local and systemic effects of cancer that impact balance.
    • Explain the local and systemic effects of cancer treatment that impact balance.
    • Apply the appropriate screening tools with the ICF model to manage balance impairment in a patient with cancer.
    • Apply evidence-based examination strategies to assess balance in a patient with cancer.
    • Apply evidence-based intervention strategies to treat balance dysfunction in a patient with cancer.

    Thursday, February 9

    Exercise Guidelines for Patients With Cancer: Where Are We? Where Would We Like to Be? Where's the Physical Therapy? Part 1

    Time: 8:00 am-10:00 am (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: G. Stephen Morris, PT, PhD, Ann M. Flores, PT, PhD, MS, MA, CLT, Cindy Pfalzer, Elizabeth Hile, PT, PhD, NCS

    Level: Basic

    Exercise reconditioning is a widely researched and clinically utilized treatment paradigm for the oncology survivor. Several guidelines have been published by organizations such as the American College of Sports Medicine, American Cancer Society, and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Individuals have also published their own exercise guidelines. These guidelines provide useful clinical guidance, but they are taken largely from the cardiopulmonary exercise testing and prescription literature and have not been tailored to the oncology setting. This presentation will describe how these guidelines might be implemented in the context of cancer survivorship (defined to begin with the receipt of an oncology diagnosis through active treatment, and on into post treatment survivorship). The speaker will discuss exercise testing, prescription, and the benefits cancer survivors can derive from exercise training; of the available guidelines that are specific to or potentially applicable to the cancer survivor; and the application of these guidelines in an oncology setting. Clinicians will leave the session with the necessary information to employ current oncology exercise guidelines in their practice.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Discuss acute and adaptive changes brought about in the oncology population by participating in an exercise training program.
    • Explain why participation in an exercise training program should be considered a treatment option for most oncology patients.
    • Describe common methods of exercise testing.
    • Generally understand the basics of exercise prescriptions.
    • Discuss currently available exercise guidelines available for use in the oncology population.
    • Apply these recommendations to an oncology patient population.

    Peripheral Edema: Diagnosis and Intervention Strategies Across All Patient Populations, Part 1

    Time: 8:00 am-10:00 am (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Marisa Perdomo, PT, DPT, Antoinette P. Sander, PT, DPT, MS, CLT-LANA, Kimiko A. Yamada, PT, DPT, OCS, CSCS, ATC, Dawn Franceschina, PT, DPT, Michael Simpson, PT, DPT

    Level: Multiple Level

    Peripheral edema is a common pathology that impedes healing and function. Whether the edema occurs as a result of a sports-related trauma, orthopedic surgery, venous insufficiency, or cancer treatment, physical therapists are often frustrated with their outcomes and unaware of the potential interventions available. This course will present the pathophysiology of peripheral edema and the differential diagnosis process. Evidence-based treatment options will be presented and evaluated. The speakers will use a variety of edema case studies to integrate course content. Participants will be encouraged to actively engage in the diagnosis process and decide which interventions best fit the clinical presentation.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Utilize the pathophysiology of edema in the differential diagnosis process to determine if physical therapy is appropriate for the patient or if referral for medical consult is warranted.
    • Examine a variety of edema interventions that can be utilized across patient populations.
    • Select edema interventions based on the etiology of the edema and best evidence available.

    Peripheral Edema: Diagnosis and Intervention Strategies Across all Patient Populations, Part 2

    Time: 10:30 am-11:30 am (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Marisa Perdomo, PT, DPT, Antoinette P. Sander, PT, DPT, MS, CLT-LANA, Kimiko A. Yamada, PT, DPT, OCS, CSCS, ATC, Dawn Franceschina, PT, DPT, Michael Simpson, PT, DPT

    Level: Multiple Level

    Peripheral edema is a common pathology that impedes healing and function. Whether the edema occurs as a result of a sports-related trauma, orthopedic surgery, venous insufficiency, or cancer treatment, physical therapists are often frustrated with their outcomes and unaware of the potential interventions available. This course will present the pathophysiology of peripheral edema and the differential diagnosis process. Evidence-based treatment options will be presented and evaluated. The speakers will use a variety of edema case studies to integrate course content. Participants will be encouraged to actively engage in the diagnosis process and decide which interventions best fit the clinical presentation.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Utilize the pathophysiology of edema in the differential diagnosis process to determine if physical therapy is appropriate for the patient or if referral for medical consult is warranted.
    • Examine a variety of edema interventions that can be utilized across patient populations.
    • Select edema interventions based on the etiology of the edema and best evidence available.

    Exercise Guidelines for Patients With Cancer: Where Are We? Where Would We Like to Be? Where's the Physical Therapy? Part 2

    Time: 10:30 am-11:30 am (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: G. Stephen Morris, PT, PhD, Ann M. Flores, PT, PhD, MS, MA, CLT, Cindy Pfalzer, Elizabeth Hile, PT, PhD, NCS

    Level: Basic

    Exercise reconditioning is a widely researched and clinically utilized treatment paradigm for the oncology survivor. Several guidelines have been published by organizations such as the American College of Sports Medicine, American Cancer Society, and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Individuals have also published their own exercise guidelines. These guidelines provide useful clinical guidance, but they are taken largely from the cardiopulmonary exercise testing and prescription literature and have not been tailored to the oncology setting. This presentation will describe how these guidelines might be implemented in the context of cancer survivorship (defined to begin with the receipt of an oncology diagnosis through active treatment, and on into post treatment survivorship). The speaker will discuss exercise testing, prescription, and the benefits cancer survivors can derive from exercise training; of the available guidelines that are specific to or potentially applicable to the cancer survivor; and the application of these guidelines in an oncology setting. Clinicians will leave the session with the necessary information to employ current oncology exercise guidelines in their practice.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Discuss acute and adaptive changes brought about in the oncology population by participating in an exercise training program.
    • Explain why participation in an exercise training program should be considered a treatment option for most oncology patients.
    • Identify common methods of exercise testing.
    • Describe the basics of exercise prescriptions.
    • Use currently available exercise guidelines for oncology patients.
    • Apply these recommendations to an oncology patient population.

    Preventative Rehabilitation: A Novel Approach to the Hospitalized Oncology Patient

    Time: 3:30 pm-5:30 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Keren Palgi-Bornstein, PT, DPT, Jean M. Kotkiewicz, PT, DPT

    Level: Multiple Level

    This presentation will include the preventative therapeutic approaches used to manage inpatients at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC). The speakers will discuss in detail the Center's postoperative pulmonary program (POPP) for surgical patients, wellness program for patients receiving bone marrow transplants (BMT), Early Mobility Program for ICU patients, and comprehensive inpatient lymphedema and edema program.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Describe MSKCC's comprehensive postoperative pulmonary program for eligible surgical patients and be familiar with the guidelines of care and relevant supporting research.
    • Discuss MSKCC's wellness program for inpatients receiving allogenic BMT and a typical treatment plan for this not-so-typical patient population.
    • Educate PTs about MSKCC's Early Mobility Program for intubated ICU patients and the techniques and methods for minimizing functional decline during this tenuous period.
    • Explain MSKCC's comprehensive treatment approach for medically complicated lymphedema and edema patients and discuss MSKCC's lower-extremity lymphedema prevention group and its benefits to the targeted postoperative population.
    • Describe MSKCC's breast surgery rehabilitation group for all immediate postoperative breast surgery patients, including all reconstructive and non-reconstructive procedures.
    • Discuss MSKCC's developing program targeting patients with planned removal of large vessels and ways to most effectively manage postoperative lymphedema and vascular insufficiency.
    • Apply this new prevention method using a pre-operative team approach for compression garment fitting.

    Diagnosis Dialog for Oncology Physical Therapists

    Time: 3:30 pm-5:30 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Catherine C. Goodman, PT, MBA, CBP, Barbara J. Norton, PT, PhD, FAPTA, Lisa Massa, PT, WCS, Molly Reynolds, PT, Stacie Larkin, PT, DPT, MEd, Jean O'Toole, PT, MPH

    Level: Multiple Level

    Our profession's success in achieving at least 3 aspects of Vision 2020: autonomous practice, direct access, and the Doctor of Physical Therapy degree, is dependent upon a thorough understanding of diagnosis-related issues and widespread, consistent use of commonly understood terminology for describing the conditions that affect the movement system of our patients. Oncology PTs need to embrace the practice of making diagnoses that are within the scope of our practice and related to our profession's focus on human movement. This session will briefly summarize issues that have been discussed in a series of 8 conferences on diagnosis, provide examples of diagnoses that are relevant to oncology PTs, and engage in a conversation with the audience about the process of developing diagnoses based on syndromes, that is, collections of signs and symptoms related to the human movement system.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Relate the history of diagnosis in PT, the diagnosis dialog discussions, and the dilemmas related to the development of movement system-based diagnoses.
    • Discuss the need for widespread, consistent use of commonly understood terminology for diagnosing dysfunction of the human movement system.
    • Explain how the use of a common diagnostic scheme will impact clinical practice of physical therapists working with oncology patients.
    • Introduce a process for developing a diagnosis for patients with movement problems related to cancer or the treatment of cancer.

    Friday, February 10

    Cancer in Children: A Case-based Approach, Part 1

    Time: 8:00 am-10:00 am (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Lynn Tanner, PT, MPT, Colleen Coulter, PT, DPT, PhD, PCS, Shawn Israel, PT, DPT, Angela M. Corr, PT, DPT, Denise Cortes, PT, MBA, PCS

    Level: Intermediate

    Approximately 10,000 children are diagnosed with cancer each year. Hematological cancers are the most common, followed by cancers of the nervous system and other solid tumors. Physical therapists provide assessment and interventions for children with such diagnoses in order to reach goals of restored mobility and continued development. Through a series of case presentations speakers from the Pediatric Oncology SIG will provide content on the examination, evaluation, and management of children with selected oncological disorders/treatments.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Describe the process of screening and differential diagnosis/red flags for children with signs and symptoms that may indicate the presence of a hematological, nervous system, or bone/soft tissue malignancy.
    • Review the pathophysiology for selected cancer diagnoses.
    • Establish a medical and therapeutic management plan for selected cancer diagnoses.
    • Discuss potential lifelong challenges and late effects of treatment that face children who were treated for cancer.
    • Ask questions about the cases and openly discuss issues relating to the diagnosis, treatment, and long-term management of children with cancer.

    Cancer in Children: A Case-based Approach, Part 2

    Time: 10:30 am-11:30 am (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Lynn Tanner, PT, MPT, Colleen Coulter, PT, PhD, Shawn Israel, PT, DPT, Angela M. Corr, PT, DPT, Denise Cortes, PT, MBA, PCS

    Level: Intermediate

    Approximately 10,000 children are diagnosed with cancer each year. Hematological cancers are the most common, followed by cancers of the nervous system and other solid tumors. Physical therapists provide assessment and interventions for children with such diagnoses in order to reach goals of restored mobility and continued development. Through a series of case presentations, speakers from the Pediatric Oncology SIG will provide content on the examination, evaluation, and management of children with selected oncological disorders/treatments.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Describe the process of screening and differential diagnosis/red flags for children with signs and symptoms that may indicate the presence of a hematological, nervous system, or bone/soft tissue malignancy.
    • Review the pathophysiology for selected cancer diagnoses.
    • Establish a medical and therapeutic management plan for selected cancer diagnoses.
    • Discuss potential lifelong challenges and late effects of treatment that face children who were treated for cancer.
    • Ask questions about the cases and openly discuss issues relating to the diagnosis, treatment, and long-term management of children with cancer.

    Oncology Section Task Force on Breast Cancer Outcomes

    Time: 10:30 am-12:30 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Pamela K. Levangie, PT, DSc, DPT, FAPTA, Mary I. Fisher, PT, MSPT, OCS, Marisa Perdomo, PT, DPT, Tiffany Kendig, PT, MSPT, MPH

    Level: Intermediate

    As an outgrowth of the EDGE (Evaluation Database to Guide Effectiveness) Task Force of the Section on Research, the Oncology Section formed a task force to examine and categorize the utility of available clinical tests and measures to identify possible deficits (or assess changes) in body structure, activities, or participation in individuals treated for breast cancer. This sessions reports on the evidence for outcomes in the upper extremity domains of scapular posture and kinematics, shoulder (scapulohumeral) function, and lifting/carrying/reaching activities. Measurement characteristics including psychometric properties, administration issues, and limitations as reported in the literature will be discussed.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Briefly describe the most common impairments of body structure and activity limitations in individuals treated for breast cancer.
    • Describe the role of consistency in outcomes assessment to monitor patient status and demonstrate intervention effectiveness in both individuals and patient groups.
    • Identify selected outcome measures that can appropriately be used for individuals about to undergo treatment or who have been treated for breast cancer.
    • Discuss the relative merits of presented outcome tools based on psychometric properties, administration issues, and limitations.

    Orthopedic Manual Therapy for the Individual With Movement Impairments Resulting From Radiation Therapy

    Time: 3:30 pm-5:30 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Marisa Perdomo, PT, DPT, Chris A. Sebelski, PT, DPT, OCS, CSCS

    Level: Multiple Level

    The use of joint and soft tissue mobilizations are fundamental interventions to address movement impairments. For the majority of cancers, radiation therapy is an effective modality in achieving a remission or cure as well as in controlling metastatic disease. While the adverse tissue effects of radiation therapy are well known, the effect of manual therapy techniques on radiated regions is not. Individuals with a current or prior history of cancer experience extensive loss of joint and tissue mobility; however, physical therapists are often hesitant to use manual techniques in these individuals. Manual therapy techniques such as joint mobilization and soft tissue mobilization, while fundamental interventions to address movement impairments, are frequently underused in this patient population. This session focuses on the physiological effect and potential use of manual therapy techniques for individuals who have received radiation therapy. Additionally, the clinical reasoning process that determines how, when, and at what intensity to provide these interventions will be discussed. The evidence for treatment will be reviewed, and case presentations will assist the participant in the clinical reasoning process, including a review of the principles and therapeutic application of joint mobilization, soft tissue mobilizations and therapeutic exercise.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Select the appropriate examination tests and measures for the shoulder complex and hip-pelvis complex which include: accessory mobility, muscle length, and assessment of end-feel for the patient with complications from radiation therapy.
    • Create a plan of care that integrates the cellular effect of radiation-induced tissue fibrosis with the physiological stages of healing.
    • Implement a plan of care that includes a progression of soft tissue mobilizations and joint mobilizations (grade I-V) with appropriate follow-up of therapeutic exercise.
    • List the contraindications and indications for manual therapy for tissues affected by radiation therapy.

    Saturday, February 11

    Oncology Physiotherapists: Preventing Cancer and Treating the Metastatic Sequel

    Time: 8:00 am-9:30 am (See Program for Room)

    Speaker: Oren Cheifetz, PT, MSc

    Level: Intermediate

    In this 90-minute interactive course, participants will be encouraged to engage in a discussion on their beliefs of the role of physiotherapists in the prevention of cancer. The speaker will discuss the benefits of exercise for people with metastatic cancer, and attendees will be encouraged to share their expertise, questions, and thoughts.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Describe the strengths and weaknesses of the evidence supporting the role of physiotherapists in the prevention of cancer.
    • Describe strategies to engage patients with cancer in exercise programs.
    • State the indications for the use of exercise for patients with cancer.
    • Relate to the challenges of using exercise for patients with cancer.
    • Demonstrate an understanding of safety considerations relevant to exercise for patients with cancer.

    Physical Therapy Management of Individuals With HIV: An Overview and Update

    Time: 8:00 am-10:00 am (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: David Kietrys, PT, MS, OCS, Mary Lou Galantino, PT, PhD, MSCE

    Level: Multiple Level

    This course will briefly review HIV pathophysiology and the current status of the medical management of this chronic disease. The speakers will discuss the role of physical therapy across the stages of the disease, including optimal exercise programming from an evidence-based perspective. The course will include a review of the strategies for managing frequently seen comorbidites, such as lipodystrophy (fat redistribution syndrome) and peripheral neuropathy, using case examples to help illustrate key points. There will be a brief discussion of social/practice issues, such as working with HIV-positive athletes, effective communication with HIV-positive clients/patients, and HIV-positive physical therapists.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Describe the neuromusculoskeletal features of HIV and discuss their effects on function.
    • Design safe exercise programs, based on the stage of disease, for HIV-positive individuals.
    • Describe the role of the PT or PTA in the management of common impairments associated with HIV and its comorbidities, and integrate physical therapy interventions into a multidisciplinary model.
    • Apply recommendations for social issues, such as working with HIV-positive athletes and occupational exposure.

    Oncology PT Intervention Performed by a Physical Therapist Generalist: Educational Strategies to Improve Safety and Outcomes

    Time: 10:30-12:00 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speaker: Linda McGrath Boyle, PT, DPT, OCS, CLT-LANA

    Level: Multiple Level

    This lecture will suggest a process for educating physical therapist generalists in safe and effective intervention for cancer survivors from the time of diagnosis through long-term survivorship. The focus will be on program development in a large health network. The speaker will review the use of Web-based resources, electronic learning modules, and direct in-service. In addition, the promotion of cancer rehabilitation services to health network physicians will be discussed.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Create a template for oncology rehab education for PT generalists in a large health network.
    • List disease-specific, PT-related impairments and interventions according to primary cancer and side effects of cancer intervention.
    • Discuss assessment tools, including the use of electronic learning modules to measure PT competency versus direct in-service with written competency.
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