Archive: CSM 2012: Orthopaedics Programming

  • This is archived programming for CSM 2012. See current programming.

    Browse Orthopaedics sessions by day. Return to the main topic menu.

    Tuesday, February 7 | Wednesday, February 8 | Thursday, February 9 | Friday, February 10 | Saturday, February 11

    * Should you choose to preselect sessions during the registration process, please be advised that preselection is not a guarantee of a seat. Attendees are asked to preselect to better determine room size and all efforts will be made to accommodate sessions in the largest rooms possible. All attendees are encouraged to show up to sessions early. Attendees are also encouraged to select alternative sessions in the event their first choice is full.

    Tuesday, February 7 (Preconference)

    *SOLD OUT -- A Practical and Informed Approach to Exercise Prescription for Neck Pain, Part 1

    Time: 8:00 am-5:30 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: James M. Elliott, PT, PhD, Shaun P. O'Leary, PT, PhD

    Level: Advanced

    Preconference Pricing: Standard Plus (2 day)

    CEUs: 1.5 (15 contact hours/CCUs)

    Exercise for the patient with neck pain: How do you know which exercises would be most beneficial for your patient with neck pain? Is the exercise program effectively increasing your patient's regional endurance, strength, and function? How many exercises should be prescribed? How can we improve exercise adherence? Join us for an opportunity to address these and other questions to enhance your skills in prescribing exercise for the management of chronic neck pain. This 2-day course will detail the collaborative research findings from the Centre of Clinical Research Excellence in Spinal Pain, Injury, and Health and The Centre for Advanced Imaging at the University of Queensland, Australia; and the Department of Physical Therapy and Human Movement Sciences in the Feinberg School of Medicine at Northwestern University, Chicago, IL. This course will feature details related to the examination, selection, administration, and progression of specific exercises for patients with pain and physical impairments related to traumatic and non-traumatic neck pain. An evidenced-based approach will be used to demonstrate the scientific basis of clinical tests and non-invasive MRI measures used in a variety of research and clinical settings to measure pain and physical impairment in patients with neck disorders. Emphasis will be on differentiating the varied clinical presentation of patients with traumatic and non-traumatic neck pain. Furthermore, the speakers will discuss clinical decisions related to the progression of exercise for the anterior and posterior neck muscles as well as the axioscapular musculature.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Enhance your knowledge of cervical spine motion and muscle function to improve your clinical decisions for the prescription and progression of exercise.
    • Develop a practical interpretation of the probable mechanisms underlying pain and physical impairment in the patient with traumatic versus non-traumatic neck pain.
    • Apply clinical tests used to identify pain and physical impairments in the neuromusculoskeletal system of the patient with neck disorders.
    • Gain an understanding of the non-invasive MRI measures used to quantify neuromuscular degeneration and altered activation patterns of neck and shoulder girdle muscles in patients with neck disorders.
    • Provide a systematic approach to identify which patient(s) may benefit from a therapeutic exercise program.
    • Prescribe appropriate exercise training programs for the patient with neck pain in tandem with other therapeutics, such as manual therapy.

    *SOLD OUT -- Thrust Joint Manipulation Skills Development for Physical Therapists: A Laboratory Course, Part 1

    Time: 8:00 am-5:30 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: William O'Grady, PT, DPT, OCS, LFAAOMPT, DAAPM, Michael O'Donnell, PT, DPT, OCS, FAAOMPT, Ann Porter-Hoke, PT, DPT, OCS, FAAOMPT

    Level: Advanced

    Preconference Pricing: Standard Plus (2 day)

    CEUs: 1.5 (15 contact hours/CCUs)

    This course is designed to maximize physical therapists' ability to successfully modify manipulation techniques to produce the best results. These techniques will focus on operator stance, posture, and handling; patient positioning; and modifying factors. This course will be primarily dedicated to hands-on lab practice. Guided discussions will provide for rationale, indications, and contraindications of manipulation and risks.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Recognize the current best evidence for the implementation of thrust joint spinal manipulation in clinical practice.
    • Have a working knowledge of the safety issues, precautions, and contraindications to thrust joint manipulation and be able to apply them in the course.
    • Safely, effectively, and skillfully apply the tests and techniques taught in the course.
    • Have a working knowledge in the choice of manipulative procedures in an evidence-based multi-modal approach to spinal pain.

    Wednesday, February 8 (Preconference)

    *SOLD OUT -- A Practical and Informed Approach to Exercise Prescription for Neck Pain, Part 2

    Time: 8:00 am-5:30 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: James M. Elliott, PT, PhD, Shaun P. O'Leary, PT, PhD

    Level: Advanced

    Preconference Pricing: Standard Plus (2 day)

    CEUs: 1.5 (15 contact hours/CCUs)

    Exercise for the patient with neck pain: How do you know which exercises would be most beneficial for your patient with neck pain? Is the exercise program effectively increasing your patient's regional endurance, strength, and function? How many exercises should be prescribed? How can we improve exercise adherence? Join us for an opportunity to address these and other questions to enhance your skills in prescribing exercise for the management of chronic neck pain. This 2-day course will detail the collaborative research findings from the Centre of Clinical Research Excellence in Spinal Pain, Injury, and Health and The Centre for Advanced Imaging at the University of Queensland, Australia; and the Department of Physical Therapy and Human Movement Sciences in the Feinberg School of Medicine at Northwestern University, Chicago, IL. This course will feature details related to the examination, selection, administration, and progression of specific exercises for patients with pain and physical impairments related to traumatic and non-traumatic neck pain. An evidenced-based approach will be used to demonstrate the scientific basis of clinical tests and non-invasive MRI measures used in a variety of research and clinical settings to measure pain and physical impairment in patients with neck disorders. Emphasis will be on differentiating the varied clinical presentation of patients with traumatic and non-traumatic neck pain. Furthermore, the speakers will discuss clinical decisions related to the progression of exercise for the anterior and posterior neck muscles as well as the axioscapular musculature.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Enhance your knowledge of cervical spine motion and muscle function to improve your clinical decisions for the prescription and progression of exercise.
    • Develop a practical interpretation of the probable mechanisms underlying pain and physical impairment in the patient with traumatic versus non-traumatic neck pain.
    • Apply clinical tests used to identify pain and physical impairments in the neuromusculoskeletal system of the patient with neck disorders.
    • Gain an understanding of the non-invasive MRI measures used to quantify neuromuscular degeneration and altered activation patterns of neck and shoulder girdle muscles in patients with neck disorders.
    • Provide a systematic approach to identify which patient(s) may benefit from a therapeutic exercise program.
    • Prescribe appropriate exercise training programs for the patient with neck pain in tandem with other therapeutics, such as manual therapy.

    Evaluation, Conservative Intervention, and Postsurgical Rehabilitation for Individuals With Nonarthritic Hip Pain

    Time: 8:00 am-5:30 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: RobRoy L. Martin, PT, PhD, Keelan Enseki, PT, MS, ATC, SCS, CSCS, Hal Martin, MD

    Level: Multiple Level

    Preconference Pricing: Standard Plus

    CEUs: 0.7 (7 contact hours/CCUs)

    Diagnosis and treatment of individuals with non-arthritic hip-related pathology can be difficult due to the close interrelationship among the lumbopelvic complex, soft tissue structures, and the hip joint itself. This lab-intensive course will outline an evaluation algorithm to assist with the differential diagnosis process for pathologies associated with the hip region. These specific evaluation techniques will allow for a classification-based plan of care and include hands-on mobilization techniques and innovative exercises. Essential diagnostic imaging techniques, including radiographs, magnetic resonance imaging arthrogram, and diagnostic injections, will be integrated into the evaluation process. Arthroscopic surgical procedures and techniques for postsurgical rehabilitation will also be discussed. This unique course will offer the teaching expertise of an orthopedic surgeon who specializes in hip arthroscopy. Clinicians will learn how to implement these evaluation and treatment techniques into their practice. Concerns for the rehabilitation of athletes with sport-specific considerations will also be reviewed, including clinical pearls and perils to help improve patient outcomes.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Determine, prioritize, and apply evaluation techniques that can be used to differentiate lumbopelvic pathology from various hip pathologies.
    • Select and apply basic mobilization techniques directed at the hip and lumbopelvic complex.
    • Develop a classification-based plan of care for individuals with hip pathology after assessing the findings from a systematic examination of the hip joint and surrounding soft tissue.
    • Assess diagnostic imaging techniques and indications for specific arthroscopic procedures of the hip joint.
    • Determine and apply appropriate therapeutic techniques for rehabilitating individuals who have undergone arthroscopic hip procedures.
    • Outline sport-specific considerations when rehabilitating athletes.

    Manual Therapy Interventions for Individuals With Acute and Chronic Foot and Ankle Pathologies

    Time: 8:00 am-5:30 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Stephanie Albin, PT, DPT, OCS, FAAOMPT, Christian Little, PT, DPT, OCS, FAAOMPT

    Level: Intermediate

    Preconference Pricing: Standard Plus

    CEUs: 0.8 (8 contact hours/CCUs)

    This 1-day, hands-on, laboratory-based course will focus on the use of mobilization and manipulation techniques that can be incorporated into the plan of care for individuals who have had extensive trauma to the foot and ankle, as well as those individuals with chronic overuse conditions. The morning session will initially focus on the current evidence to support the use of the manual therapy techniques to be presented, followed by hands-on laboratory experiences. The afternoon sessions will focus on case studies to integrate the manual therapy concepts and techniques presented in the morning session. In addition, a discussion and practice session on the use of mobilization of movement will also occur in the afternoon session. Best available evidence will be integrated into all discussion and laboratory sessions. The intent of this course is to provide attendees with useful, clinically relevant information that can be immediately applied to various practice settings.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Select appropriate manual therapy techniques to address impairments identified for selected patient populations.
    • Recognize impairments above and below the affected regions that may contribute to the patient's primary complaint.
    • Perform manual therapy techniques to effectively manage motion dysfunctions and/or pain of the distal tibiofibular joint, the talocrural (ankle) joint, the talocalcaneal (subtalar) joint, the midtarsal joints, and the first metatarsophalangeal joint.
    • Critically appraise the manual therapy intervention strategies for the foot and ankle complex, consistent with the available evidence-based literature.

    Sonography for Common Lower-Extremity Orthopedic and Sports Conditions

    Time: 8:00 am-5:30 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Douglas M. White, PT, DPT, OCS, Wayne Smith, PT, DPT, MEd, SCS, ATC, Joel Fallano, PT, DPT, MS, OCS

    Level: Multiple Level

    Preconference Pricing: Standard Plus

    CEUs: 0.8 (8 contact hours/CCUs)

    Sonography is fast becoming an adjunct to physical therapy management of orthopedic and sports conditions, from professional athletes and Olympians to outpatient clinics with a general orthopedic patient population. This course will provide an overview of the physics of sonography and the physical therapy application of musculoskeletal sonography for common hip, knee, and ankle conditions. The speakers will present techniques for imaging the lower extremity and identifying normal anatomy and abnormal morphology. The indications for, and limitations of, sonography and other imaging modalities in musculoskeletal conditions will be discussed, as well as the practical aspects of incorporating sonography into PT practice. Participants will apply techniques learned using hands-on sessions with live demonstrations and practice sessions.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Explain ultrasound physics and instrumentation of ultrasound equipment.
    • Identify when sonography is indicated to assist in managing common conditions of the lower extremity.
    • Describe what information can be derived from sonography.
    • Discuss the relevance of sonography as compared to other imaging modalities.
    • Apply information presented in a laboratory setting to gain introductory proficiency in imaging the lower extremity.
    • Evaluate the practicalities of obtaining ultrasound equipment, incorporating its use, and reimbursement for ultrasound interventions.

    *SOLD OUT -- Thrust Joint Manipulation Skills Development for Physical Therapists: A Laboratory Course, Part 2

    Time: 8:00 am-5:30 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: William O'Grady, PT, DPT, OCS, LFAAOMPT, DAAPM, Michael O'Donnell, PT, DPT, OCS, FAAOMPT, Ann Porter-Hoke, PT, DPT, OCS, FAAOMPT

    Level: Advanced

    Preconference Pricing: Standard Plus (2 day)

    CEUs: 1.5 (15 contact hours/CCUs)

    This course is designed to maximize physical therapists' ability to successfully modify manipulation techniques to produce the best results. These techniques will focus on operator stance, posture, and handling; patient positioning; and modifying factors. This course will be primarily dedicated to hands-on lab practice. Guided discussions will provide for rationale, indications, and contraindications of manipulation and risks.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Recognize the current best evidence for the implementation of thrust joint spinal manipulation in clinical practice.
    • Have a working knowledge of the safety issues, precautions, and contraindications to thrust joint manipulation and be able to apply them in the course.
    • Safely, effectively, and skillfully apply the tests and techniques taught in the course.
    • Have a working knowledge in the choice of manipulative procedures in an evidence-based multi-modal approach to spinal pain.

    Thursday, February 9

    Ankle Instability: Current Concepts for Evaluation and Management, Part 1

    Time: 8:00 am-10:00 am (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Todd E. Davenport, PT, DPT, OCS, John Meyer, PT, DPT, OCS, FAFS, Terry Grindstaff, PT, PhD, SCS, CSCS, ATC

    Level: Intermediate

    Ankle instability is one of the most common foot and ankle conditions managed by physical therapists. Sponsored by the Orthopaedic Section Foot & Ankle Special-Interest Group, Part 1 of this 2-part session will provide attendees with the optimal evaluation and treatment strategies for the management of individuals with ankle instability. The current best practice model as outlined in the Ankle Instability Clinical Guidelines currently being developed by the Orthopaedic Section's ICF Foot & Ankle Workgroup will provide the framework for this presentation. The speakers will highlight current controversies in practice and research. During the second hour of programming, the speakers will address the examination and management of syndesmotic or "high" ankle sprains, considered to be one of the most complex types of ankle sprains. The anatomy of the distal tibiofibular syndesmosis, mechanisms of injury, evaluation, differential diagnosis, appropriate imaging, rehabilitation, and return-to-activity guidelines will be presented based on current, best available evidence. The format for this session will include lecture and interactive discussions between presenters and attendees.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Describe evidence-based practice, including diagnosis, prognosis, intervention, and assessment of outcome, for individuals with ankle instability.
    • Integrate anatomical, biomechanical, and neuromuscular concepts relating to the etiology, examination, and intervention strategies for individuals with ankle instability that are commonly employed by physical therapist but require further research to advocate their use.
    • Formulate an evaluation and rehabilitation program for individuals with syndesmotic or high ankle sprains that include return-to-activity guidelines.
    • Apply the International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health terminology related to impairments of body function and body structure, activity limitations, and participation restrictions for individuals with ankle instability.

    Changing the Conversation From Injury Management to Wellness Activities, Part 1: Health Promotion in Your Practice Setting and on the Job Site

    Time: 8:00 am-10:00 am (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Dee W. Edington, PhD, Joanette Lima, PT, MS, CIE, CPE, Cory Blickenstaff, PT, MS, OCS

    Level: Intermediate

    A culture of wellness at job sites, including every physical therapy practice setting, benefits individuals, society, and corporate health. Starting with their own workplace, PTs have a unique opportunity to assist industry in the creation of a healthy and high-performing workforce. Conclusions from longitudinal studies encourage a change from the illness/injury model to one that promotes and gives incentives for wellness. This session will examine an evidence-based, transformational approach to creating a healthy and high-performing workforce. in the speakers will address how individual health promotion, organizational environments, and workplace cultures impact health care cost containment, disability, productivity, and human resource development. Following the main' presentation, the PT's' role in this novel approach will be explored through a case study and panel discussion with Dee Edington, PhD, and physical therapists currently working with corporations.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Discuss the economic and societal benefits of wellness initiatives in the workplace.
    • Implement wellness initiatives in the workplace.
    • Identify the PT's dual role of promoting early return to work or remaining at work while giving incentive for wellness.
    • Work within a multidisciplinary model to promote wellness as a lifestyle.
    • Apply the multidisciplinary and coordinated approach to health promotion.

    Thrust Joint Manipulation for the Cervical Spine

    Time: 8:00 am-10:00 am (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Emilio (Louie) J. Puentedura, PT, DPT, GDMT, OCS, FAAOMPT

    Level: Basic

    There is good evidence to support manual therapy directed to the cervical spine in some patients with neck pain. These manual therapy techniques include passive joint mobilization (non-thrust techniques) and thrust joint manipulation (TJM). Many physical therapists may be reluctant to utilize TJM to the cervical spine because of perceived risks associated with thrust techniques applied to this region. This session will provide an opportunity for participants to take a renewed, critical look at TJM to the cervical spine and consider risks and benefits. The speakers will present new research from recent studies. The first is a randomized clinical trial comparing outcomes of patients with neck pain who met a clinical prediction rule for thoracic spine TJM and received TJM to their cervical spine instead of the thoracic spine. The second study is a review of documented case reports of serious adverse events associated with TJM to the cervical spine to determine if the TJM was used appropriately and if the events could have been prevented. The final study present results of a survey on educational opportunities in TJM for Doctor of Physical Therapy students and novice clinicians. The information presented should provide for a more thoughtful analysis of the use of TJM in the cervical spine.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Apply the current best evidence for the implementation of thrust joint spinal manipulation to the cervical spine in clinical practice.
    • Consider the safety issues, precautions, and contraindications to thrust joint manipulation in the cervical spine and apply them in clinical practice.
    • Explain the need to introduce and advance entry-level education of thrust joint manipulation in the cervical spine.
    • Choose manipulative procedures in an evidence-based multi-modal approach to spinal pain, including adjunct treatments such as exercise, mobilization, modalities, and more.

    Manual Therapy: How Does It Work?

    Time: 10:30 am-12:30 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Joshua Cleland, PT, PhD, Joel Bialosky, PT, OCS

    Level: Intermediate

    A substantial body of knowledge exists demonstrating the benefits of manual therapy for the management of a variety of conditions. However, it appears that the evidence is often lost in translation, as there exists considerable variation in physical therapist practice. Specifically, manual therapy interventions are often underutilized, potentially leading to suboptimal patient outcomes. Perhaps some of the reason for the underutilization may be related to lack of clarity surrounding the mechanisms of manual therapy. While traditional philosophies have relied on a biomechanical explanation for the observed effects, recent evidence suggests that a complex cascade of neurophysiologic effects may be at work. This lecture will discuss recent evidence related to the mechanisms behind many of our manual therapy interventions.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Identify reasons for the underutilization of manual therapy interventions.
    • Discuss the current evidence relative to mechanisms by which manipulation exerts its effects.
    • Describe potential educational methods to enhance the utilization of manual therapy.
    • Implement strategies for changing practice behaviors and delivering manual therapy services to a wider range of appropriate patients.

    Ankle Instability: Current Concepts for Evaluation and Management, Part 2, & Foot & Ankle SIG Business Meeting

    Time: 10:30 am-12:30 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Todd E. Davenport, PT, DPT, OCS, John Meyer, PT, DPT, OCS, FAFS, Terry L. Grindstaff, PT, PhD, SCS, ATC

    Level: Intermediate

    Ankle instability is one of the most common foot and ankle conditions managed by physical therapists. Sponsored by the Foot & Ankle Special-Interest Group, the first hour of programming in this second of 2 sessions will include a panel discussion of case studies involving an individual with ankle instability and an athlete with a syndesmotic ankle sprain, followed by a question-and-answer session. The format for this 1-hour course will be lecture as well as interactive discussion between presenters and course participants. During the second hour of this session, the Foot & Ankle Special-Interest Group will conduct the group's annual business meeting.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Describe evidence-based physical therapist practice, including diagnosis, prognosis, intervention, and assessment of outcome, for individuals with ankle instability.
    • Integrate anatomical, biomechanical, and neuromuscular concepts relating to the etiology, examination, and intervention strategies for individuals with ankle instability that are commonly employed by PTs but require further research to advocate their use.
    • Formulate an evaluation and rehabilitation program for individuals with syndesmotic or high ankle sprains that includes return-to-activity guidelines.
    • Apply the International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health terminology related to impairments of body function and body structure, activity limitations, and participation restrictions for individuals with ankle instability.

    Changing the Conversation From Injury Management to Wellness Activities, Part 2, & Occupational Health SIG Business Meeting

    Time: 10:30 am-12:30 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Dee W. Edington, PhD, Joanette Lima, PT, MS, CIE, CPE, Cory Blickenstaff, PT, MS, OCS

    Level: Intermediate

    A culture of wellness at job sites, including every physical therapy practice setting, benefits individuals, society, and corporate health. Starting with their own workplace, PTs have a unique opportunity to assist industry in the creation of a healthy and high-performing workforce. Conclusions from longitudinal studies encourage a change from the illness/injury model to one that promotes and gives incentives for wellness. This session will examine an evidence-based, transformational approach to creating a healthy and high-performing workforce. in the speakers will address how individual health promotion, organizational environments, and workplace cultures impact health care cost containment, disability, productivity, and human resource development. Following the main' presentation, the PT's' role in this novel approach will be explored through a case study and panel discussion with Dee Edington, PhD, and physical therapists currently working with corporations.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Discuss the economic and societal benefits of wellness initiatives in the workplace.
    • Implement wellness initiatives in the workplace.
    • Identify the PT's dual role of promoting early return to work or remaining at work while giving incentive for wellness.
    • Work within a multidisciplinary model to promote wellness as a lifestyle.
    • Explain the multidisciplinary and coordinated approach to health promotion.

    Glenohumeral Internal Rotation Deficit (GIRD): The Thrower's Demise

    Time: 3:30 pm-5:30 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: George Davies, PT, DPT, Todd S. Ellenbecker, PT, DPT, MS, SCS, OCS, Robert C. Manske, PT, DPT, Kevin Wilk, PT, DPT

    Level: Multiple Level

    This educational session will provide the outpatient practitioner with information on how to examine, evaluate, and treat what is quickly becoming one of the most common shoulder pathologies in the overhead athlete-glenohumeral internal rotation deficit (GIRD). A summary will involve application of the session material to several case studies to allow participants to apply techniques described in real-life patient scenarios.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Describe the pathology that is known as GIRD and list various pathologies that it may cause.
    • Analyze the available research evidence that GIRD is a potential problem in the overhead athlete.
    • Discuss studies that examine the reliability and validity of each of the tests and measures used to determine the diagnosis of GIRD.
    • Practice measurement techniques and administer GIRD testing.
    • Determine appropriate treatment approaches for patients with GIRD.
    • Apply the knowledge learned to several patient case scenarios.

    Defining Value in Physical Therapy Care: More Is Not Better, Less Is Not Better, Better Is Better

    Time: 3:30 pm-5:30 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: John D. Childs, PT, PhD, MBA, Julie Fritz, PT, PhD, Anthony Delitto, PT, PhD, FAPTA, Jeffrey W. Hathaway, PT

    Level: Multiple Level

    Are terms like pay for performance, network tiering, patient steerage, and consumer-driven health care new to your lexicon? In light of recent health care reform initiatives, the nation is now discussing the accountable care organization, or ACO. Given the fragmented physical therapy market for outpatient services, how can physical therapists align themselves to remain viable within an ACO model? "Paramount to understanding how PTs can thrive in this environment is defining value and understanding that it is dependent upon achieving optimal clinical outcomes relative to the cost of care." Come join a lively discussion on defining value in physical therapy service delivery. Attendees will learn how to capture the attention of health care system and insurance plan managers by creating a physical therapy ACO that delivers the "triple aim" of health care reform: 1) achieving measurable quality outcomes; 2) delivering an exceptional patient experience; and 3) reducing per capita cost of care.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Discuss the burden of managing musculoskeletal conditions in the US health care system and where physical therapists fit into the health care food chain.
    • Define value in physical therapy care delivery.
    • Examine the importance of timing of access to, and quality of, physical therapy services on downstream health care costs.
    • Explain the potential of PTs to form provider networks that deliver value to all health care stakeholders.
    • Describe case studies of value-based payment models in physical therapy.

    Friday, February 10

    Chronic Pain: Myths, Measures, and Management, Part 1

    Time: 8:00 am-10:00 am (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Dana Dailey, PT, Kathleen A. Sluka, PT, PhD

    Level: Basic

    This session provides the information needed for the evaluation and treatment of patients with chronic pain. Chronic pain is a challenging diagnosis for the clinician and the patient. To better understand how to evaluate chronic pain, the underlying mechanisms of chronic pain based on the current science will be presented. The latest research will be discussed in terms of translating science and research into clinical practice. Chronic pain diagnoses such as low back pain and fibromyalgia will be reviewed and the biopsychosocial model of pain will be used for developing an individual plan of care and self management strategy for patients with chronic pain. Evidence-based tests and normative data will be presented in order to establish an objective baseline and ongoing assessment. Treatment topics and progression of treatment will be reviewed with an emphasis on self-management skills for daily care, exacerbation of symptoms, and evidence-based treatment. Case studies will demonstrate patient evaluation, treatment, and management strategies.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Describe the myths regarding chronic pain and the science of pain as it relates to chronic pain.
    • Describe the biopsychosocial model of pain as is relates to chronic pain.
    • Determine the evaluation needs for patients with chronic pain.
    • Describe the evidence-based tests and measures related to chronic pain evaluation and treatment.
    • Describe the areas for teaching self-management skills for patients with chronic pain.

    From Hips to Lips: A Multi-systems Approach to the Treatment of Performing Artists, Part 1

    Time: 8:00 am-10:00 am (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Mary P. Massery, PT, DPT, Jeffrey T. Stenback, PT, OCS, Amy Humphrey, PT, DPT, OCS, MTC

    Level: Multiple Level

    Control of spine stability and postural equilibrium has relevance across the fields of physical therapy practice, from performing arts to management of continence to neurologic balance disorders and respiratory diseases. There is accruing evidence that "core" training extends beyond the abdominal muscles to achieve dynamic trunk control. This session challenges you to acknowledge a broader definition of proximal postural control. Novel research will be presented using a model of postural control (The Soda Pop Can Model) that extends from the lips (vocal folds) at the top of the trunk to the hips (pelvic floor) at the bottom of the trunk and includes abdominal, paraspinal, intercostals, and diaphragm muscles. The speaker will describe how the interactions between breathing, talking, continence. and postural stability contribute to postural control and the consequences of inadequate postural control such as low back pain, incontinence, impaired respiratory health, and compromised balance. The speakers will compel you to evaluate and treat postural control deficits from a multisystem approach considering both physiologic and physical deficits; challenge performing arts PTs to understand the link between breathing and efficient movement; andprovide performing artist case studies to enhance integration of this information.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • State how the mechanics of breathing, postural control, strength, and balance are interactive and interdependent components of normal movement, using a soda pop can as a conceptual model.
    • Describe the multiple, simultaneous roles of the diaphragm as related to breathing, postural control, gastroesophageal reflux, constipation, and venous return.
    • Explain how the management of performing artists injuries and physical issues requires consideration of the multiple functions of the trunk muscles and mechanisms for integration of functions.
    • Present novel research on the role of breathing, vocalization, and pelvis floor function as an integral part of postural control strategies, and suggest methods for incorporating this information from acute pediatrics to performing arts settings.
    • Demonstrate the integration of a multi-system approach to postural control deficits in performing artists by designing an individual evaluation and intervention program that addresses these issues.

    Effective Integration of Diagnostic Imaging Into Physical Therapist Practice

    Time: 8:00 am-10:00 am (See Program for Room)

    (Joint Program: Private Practice)

    Speakers: Michael Ross, PT, DHSc, OCS, William G. Boissonnault, PT, DHSc

    Level: Intermediate

    Many patients with orthopedic disorders have had some form of diagnostic imaging, yet they routinely have limited knowledge of how their diagnostic imaging results relate to their current problem. What should physical therapists know about diagnostic imaging, such as plain film radiography, magnetic resonance imaging, bone scans, and computed tomography, to facilitate appropriate patient education and management, as well as maximize outcomes? This session discusses diagnostic imaging principles that can be immediately integrated into clinical practice. The indications and diagnostic utility for different imaging procedures for the spine and extremities will be described. Patient case examples will offer evidence for the appropriate use of diagnostic imaging as well as demonstrate how to place imaged pathology into the appropriate clinical context to assist with the evidence-based evaluation and management of the patient. An emphasis of this session is on clinical decision making principles in an outpatient, direct access physical therapy setting. However, the principles presented will be applicable to any clinical setting.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Provide the evidence to support the acquisition of diagnostic imaging, including an explanation of radiographic clinical decision rules for orthopedic pathology related to the spine and extremities.
    • Describe the diagnostic utility and common orthopedic pathologies seen on different diagnostic imaging modalities.
    • Describe a systematic approach to the analysis of plain film radiography, magnetic resonance imaging, bone scans, and computed tomography.
    • Place diagnostic imaging results into an evidence-based approach for the evaluation and management of patients with orthopedic disorders related to the spine and extremities.
    • Effectively educate patients and clients regarding their diagnostic imaging results.
    • Appropriately communicate with other medical professionals using the language of diagnostic imaging.

    Chronic Pain: Myths, Measures, and Management, Part 2, & Pain Management SIG Business Meeting

    Time: 10:30 am-12:30 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Dana Dailey, PT, Kathleen A. Sluka, PT, PhD

    Level: Basic

    This session provides the information needed for the evaluation and treatment of patients with chronic pain. Chronic pain is a challenging diagnosis for the clinician and the patient. To better understand how to evaluate chronic pain, the underlying mechanisms of chronic pain based on the current science will be presented. The latest research will be discussed in terms of translating science and research into clinical practice. Chronic pain diagnoses such as low back pain and fibromyalgia will be reviewed and the biopsychosocial model of pain will be used for developing an individual plan of care and self management strategy for patients with chronic pain. Evidence-based tests and normative data will be presented in order to establish an objective baseline and ongoing assessment. Treatment topics and progression of treatment will be reviewed with an emphasis on self-management skills for daily care, exacerbation of symptoms, and evidence-based treatment. Case studies will demonstrate patient evaluation, treatment, and management strategies.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Describe the myths regarding chronic pain and the science of pain as it relates to chronic pain.
    • Describe the biopsychosocial model of pain as is relates to chronic pain.
    • Determine the evaluation needs for patients with chronic pain.
    • Describe the evidence-based tests and measures related to chronic pain evaluation and treatment.
    • Describe the areas for teaching self-management skills for patients with chronic pain.

    From Hips to Lips: A Multi-systems Approach to the Treatment of Performing Artists, Part 2, & Performing Arts SIG Business Meeting

    Time: 10:30 am-12:30 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Mary P. Massery, PT, DPT, Jeffrey T. Stenback, PT, OCS, Amy Humphrey, PT, DPT, OCS, MTC

    Level: Multiple Level

    Control of spine stability and postural equilibrium has relevance across the fields of physical therapy practice, from performing arts to management of continence to neurologic balance disorders and respiratory diseases. There is accruing evidence that "core" training extends beyond the abdominal muscles to achieve dynamic trunk control. This session challenges you to acknowledge a broader definition of proximal postural control. Novel research will be presented using a model of postural control (The Soda Pop Can Model) that extends from the lips (vocal folds) at the top of the trunk to the hips (pelvic floor) at the bottom of the trunk and includes abdominal, paraspinal, intercostals, and diaphragm muscles. The speaker will describe how the interactions between breathing, talking, continence. and postural stability contribute to postural control and the consequences of inadequate postural control such as low back pain, incontinence, impaired respiratory health, and compromised balance. The speakers will compel you to evaluate and treat postural control deficits from a multisystem approach considering both physiologic and physical deficits; challenge performing arts PTs to understand the link between breathing and efficient movement; andprovide performing artist case studies to enhance integration of this information.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • State how the mechanics of breathing, postural control, strength, and balance are interactive and interdependent components of normal movement, using a soda pop can as a conceptual model.
    • Describe the multiple, simultaneous roles of the diaphragm as related to breathing, postural control, gastroesophageal reflux, constipation, and venous return.
    • Explain how the management of performing artists injuries and physical issues requires consideration of the multiple functions of the trunk muscles and mechanisms for integration of functions.
    • Present novel research on the role of breathing, vocalization, and pelvis floor function as an integral part of postural control strategies, and suggest methods for incorporating this information from acute pediatrics to performing arts settings.
    • Demonstrate the integration of a multi-system approach to postural control deficits in performing artists by designing an individual evaluation and intervention program that addresses these issues.

    Managing Low Back Pain in a Direct Access Setting

    Time: 10:30 am-12:30 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Chris Maher, PT, PhD, Mark J. Hancock, PT, Chad E. Cook, PT, PhD

    Level: Intermediate

    APTA's Vision 2020 is for physical therapists to be practitioners of choice to whom consumers have direct access for the diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of selected health maladies, including low back pain. US PTs increasingly are working in direct access (primary care) settings and are increasingly assuming patient management roles that were traditionally the domain of the physician. There are obvious challenges but also tremendous opportunities for the profession to evolve and so contribute to more cost-effective management of back pain in primary care. At the same time that the scope of practice is changing, there has also been an explosion of research on managing low back pain in primary care. However, many PTs do not have the time to distill this large volume of research down to the key information they need to guide their practice. This session does it for you. It provides an overview of contemporary diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment studies to provide important take-home messages for the management of LBP in primary care. The presenters will draw upon their own research as well as other key studies in the area. The moderated debate will allow for active interchange between you and the presenters.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Provide an evidence-based answer to the following diagnosis-related questions: How should I triage a patient with acute LBP? How do I best identify those who need referral for imaging or medical review? How commonly is LBP due to an underlying serious disease such as cancer? Is it possible to identify patients whose pain arises from the SIJ? What about the disc?
    • Provide an evidence-based answer to the following prognosis-related questions: What advice should I give my patients about the prognosis of LBP? How many patients have a recurrence of their LBP within a year? How useful are yellow flags?
    • Provide an evidence-based answer to the following treatment-related questions: What should be the first line of treatment for those with acute LBP? What should I offer my patients who don't respond to simple first-line care? How does physical therapy fit in with evidence-based management of chronic low back pain? What physical therapy treatments work and what normally does not? What evidence exists for improved outcomes by matching treatment to individuals with LBP?
    • Provide an evidence-based answer to the following prevention-related questions: What physical therapy services are known to prevent LBP? How might I structure my practice to offer these services?

    Maximizing Patient Motivation: Uncovering the Hidden Barriers to Patient Adherence

    Time: 3:30 pm-5:30 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: John Woolf, PT, MS, ATC, COMT, Beth A. Haggerty, MSW, Terry Hickey, MS

    Level: Basic

    PTs are being exposed to literature that elucidates the need for a biopsychosocial model of care. However, most are ill-equipped to successfully integrate a biopsychosocial and a biomedical world view. As outcomes become increasingly important in an evolving health care system, PTs will need to maximize patients' participation in their rehabilitation. Even if PTs recognize the psychosocial barriers to a successful outcome, they have little training in how to motivate patients and change ineffective behaviors. PTs need key strategic communication skills such as motivational language, behavior change techniques, precision information gathering, and measuring therapeutic alliance to consistently create positive therapeutic alliances.. This session provides specific descriptions of neurobiology of relationship, health belief model, and therapeutic alliance, and exposes you to the following skills to maximize patient outcomes: provider-patient rapport including state management and patient calibration; eliciting patient worldview of the perceived problem, resources, goals, pathway to goals, and barriers to success; and measuring the level of therapeutic alliance.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Describe the basic neurobiology of relationship.
    • List the basic elements of a health belief model.
    • Describe the fundamental components required for a positive therapeutic alliance.
    • Establish rapport with a patient to maximize adherence to the treatment plan.
    • Measure the level of the therapeutic alliance.
    • Identify barriers to treatment plan compliance.

    Saturday, February 11

    Equine Physiotherapy Research Update, Clinical, Pathological, Imaging and Exercise-based Rehabilitation Studies, Part 1

    Time: 8:00 am-10:00 am (See Program for Room)

    Speaker: Narelle Stubbs, PT, PhD, BApp, ScPT, MAnSt

    Level: Intermediate

    Equine back pain often presents with more than one lesion or problem, including the presence of limb lameness. Osseous lesions of the thoracolumbar spine and the lumbopelvic complex are widely recognized as significant causes of equine back pain, poor/loss of performance, and altered back and limb kinematics.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Review the current literature in relation to equine (and potentially discuss the relevance to canine) physical therapy and rehabilitation using equine back pain and movements asymmetries as an example throughout.

    Scoliosis Intensive Rehabilitation for All Ages, Part 1: The 3-D, Schroth-based Method to Arrest and Reverse the Patten of Scoliosis

    Time: 8:00 am-10:00 am (See Program for Room)

    (Joint Program: Pediatrics)

    Speaker: Hagit Rajter Berdishevsky, PT, MSPT, SST, MDT

    Level: Multiple Level

    Despite nearly 100 years of Schroth therapy for scoliosis in Europe, American medicine commonly argues that physical exercise has no effect on reducing or reversing scoliosis curvature. In recent decades, however, peer-reviewed literature with scientific data supports the effect of Schroth therapy on the scoliotic body and has shown many clinical and radiological positive outcomes. These effects are statistically significant and include a decrease of curve progression, curve reversal, improved vital capacity, improved pain scores, reduction in the need for bracing/surgery, and psychological enhancement. The Schroth Method includes pattern specific exercises for scoliosis and is described to be the current best practiceby the International Society on Scoliosis Orthopedic and Rehabilitation Treatment. The therapeutic exercises focus on trunk isometric muscle strengthening and active lengthening, rotational breathing, and over-correction of the scoliotic posture.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Interpret the existing evidence for the effectiveness of the Schroth method on curve progression, curve regression, vital capacity, the need for bracing and surgery, and psychological status.
    • Recognize the specific pathomechanics associated with scoliosis that occur at various ages.
    • Synthesize information from screening and evaluation to determine the course of physical therapy intervention in regards to the scoliosis curve angle/pattern, age, and maturity.
    • Demonstrate an understanding of the Schroth classification for scoliosis.
    • Differentiate patients into 1 of the 4 therapeutic sub-groups.
    • Identify the Schroth principles of rotational breathing, trunk elongation, pelvic correction, and isometric trunk strengthening.
    • Define exercises appropriate for the major curves (eg, major thoracic, major lumbar, with/without pelvic deformity).

    How Can Conventional and Advanced MRI Applications Guide Exercise Prescription for Neck Pain?

    Time: 8:00 am-10:00 am (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: James M. Elliott, PT, PhD, Shaun P. O'Leary, PT, PhD, Barbara Cagnie, PT, PhD

    Level: Intermediate

    Informed decision making in the management of the patient with neck pain requires knowledge of the neuromuscular mechanisms underlying the diverse patterns of pain and physical impairments. Such knowledge may help to guide interventions and in particular, appropriate exercise prescription. This 2-hour course will feature the collaborative MRI and clinically based research programs from the Department of Physical Therapy and Human Movement Sciences at Northwestern University; the Centre of Clinical Research Excellence in Spinal Pain, Injury and Health at The University of Queensland, Australia; and the Department of Rehabilitation Sciences and Physiotherapy at Ghent University in Belgium. The speakers will discuss the implications of basic science research for the clinical management of the patient with traumatic and non-traumatic neck pain. The session will detail the group's research pertinent to the assessment, sub-group classification, and prescription of exercise for patients with neck pain. Key areas of the presentation will be the mechanistic basis for pain and physical impairments in the neuromusculoskeletal system as well as the observed contrasts between traumatic and non-traumatic neck pain. The speakers will review several novel measurements that have been developed to quantify/classify neuromuscular mechanisms in neck disorders, including muscle functional magnetic resonance imaging measures for the study of cervical and axioscapular motor behavior, and advanced MRI measures (including magnetic resonance spectroscopy of the spinal cord and diffusion weighted imaging of the paraspinal muscles).

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Examine the use of MRI technology for the investigation of neuromuscular impairments in patients with neck pain.
    • Recognize recent MRI studies as it relates to motor function and exercise prescription in painful neck disorders.
    • Identify the clinical and radiological findings that inform best practice decisions for patients with traumatic neck pain.
    • Integrate current best evidence into effective assessment, sub-group classification, and management of the patient with traumatic and non-traumatic neck pain.

    Scoliosis Intensive Rehabilitation for All Ages, Part 2: The 3-D Schroth Exercises for Scoliosis

    Time: 10:30 am-12:30 pm (See Program for Room)

    (Joint Program: Pediatrics)

    Speakers: Hagit Rajter, PT, MSPT, SST, MDT

    Level: Intermediate

    In Part 2 of this course, attendees will practice the therapeutic exercises focusing on trunk isometric muscle strengthening and active lengthening, rotational breathing, and over-correction of the scoliotic posture. The speakers will discuss conservative management of scoliosis at all ages, with a review of the most recent literature. Topics will include a review of the Schroth method, pathomechanics of the 3-D scoliotic body blocks, Schroth-specific classification, and sub-grouping individual patterns into an easy therapeutic cluster using the progression of the Schroth exercises.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Identify the Schroth exercise principles of rotational breathing, trunk elongation, pelvic correction, and isometric trunk strengthening.
    • Define exercises appropriate for the major curves (eg, major thoracic, major lumbar, with/without pelvic deformity).

    Ultrasound Imaging and Scope of Practice & Imaging SIG Business Meeting

    Time: 10:30 am-12:30 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Mary Fran Delaune, PT, Justin Elliott, Douglas M. White, PT, DPT, OCS, Deydre S. Teyhen, PT, PhD, OCS, Leslie Adrian, PT

    Level: Basic

    Ultrasound imaging for musculoskeletal conditions started in the 1960s and has been rapidly expanding in use. Within physical therapy, use of this technology shows significant promise, especially in its ability to augment the assessment of human movement. Ultrasound imaging can be used to provide additional information on the status of body structures, aiding in clinical management; and as treatment adjunct to facilitate motor function and quality of motion. Through this technology, physical therapists can assess muscle length, depth, diameter, cross-sectional area, volume and potential angles, changes in these features, tissue movement and deformation, impact on other body structures, and resulting function. This panel discussion will focus on how physical therapists can use ultrasound imaging to evaluate tissue morphology and function to aid clinical evaluation within their scope of practice.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Describe how ultrasound imaging is currently used in physical therapist practice.
    • Explore decision-making processes that can be used to determine how ultrasound imaging fits within state practice acts.
    • Use available resources for physical therapists, APTA chapters, and state boards of physical therapy to support ultrasound imaging.

    Equine Physiotherapy Research Update, Clinical, Pathological, Imaging and Exercise-based Rehabilitation Studies, Part 2 & Animal Rehabilitation SIG Business Meeting

    Time: 10:30 am-12:30 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speaker: Narelle Stubbs, PT, PhD, BApp, ScPT, MAnSt

    Level: Intermediate

    Research related to the changes in neuromotor control that occur with back pain has translated to the development of new rehabilitation strategies for the lumbo-pelvic muscles in human back-pain patients. This is an example of where anatomical and biomechanical research in the human creates an essential platform for future neuromotor control research in the horse.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Review evidence-based case examples and discuss their implications on clinical reasoning.

    The Challenge of the Patellofemoral Joint: Controversies and Recent Advances

    Time: 3:30 pm-5:30 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Kevin Wilk, PT, DPT, Christopher Powers, PT, PhD, Geoffrey S. Van Thiel, MD, MBA

    Level: Multiple Level

    The purpose of this course will be to provide scientific and clinical evidence for the treatment of patients with patellofemoral dysfunction. Patellofemoral joint dysfunction is one of the most common lesions treated by the physical therapist in the orthopaedic and/or sports physical therapy setting. The speakers will discuss these new advancements and provide specific treatment techniques. The non-operative treatment and surgical treatment for these patients with this lesion have changed significantly in the past 5 years. The speakers will present an evidence-based approach to non-operative, operative, and post-surgical treatments for patients with patellofemoral dysfunction.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Identify the biomechanics and the muscle activation patterns of the patellofemoral joint during gait, activities of daily living, and specific exercises.
    • Develop a non-operative treatment plan based on current evidence-based medicine.
    • Evaluate a patient with patellofemoral joint dysfunction and determine if surgery is indicated.
    • Be able to develop a post-operative rehabilitation program for the patient based on evidence-based medicine.

    Don't Forget to Be Hip: Looking at the Role of the Hip in Lumbar Spine Disorders

    Time: 3:30 pm-5:30 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Jason Tonley, PT, DPT, OCS, Marcie Harris-Hayes, PT, DPT, MSCI, OCS

    Level: Multiple Level

    Impairments of the hip have been implicated in low back pain-such as limited range of motion, decreased strength, and poor neuromuscular control-however, findings have been inconclusive. These inconclusive findings may be due to heterogeneous samples used in studies. Use of low back pain subgroups may assist in clarifying the role of hip impairments in low back pain, particularly if the subgroups are based on lumbar spine movement strategies associated with the production of symptoms. This speakers present current evidence implicating hip impairments as a contributing factor in lumbar spine disorders, including an update of the anatomical and biomechanical factors of the hip that affect the alignment and movement strategies of lumbar spine. This course will review examination procedures used to indentify inter-regional dependence of the hip and spine and the use of these exam procedures to guide treatment will be demonstrated. This discussion will be followed by resident and fellow case presentations highlighting the clinical reasoning and patient management strategies used when the hip was treated as a primary impairment for lumbar spine pain.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Discuss current biomechanical literature related to lumbar spine and hip inter-regional dependence.
    • Determine which examination procedures to use when treating the hip for lumbar spine disorders.
    • Describe 3 patient cases/case series that highlight the examination, clinical reasoning, and treatment of the hip for lumbar spine disorders.

    Use of the ICF to Develop Practice Guidelines for Common Musculoskeletal Conditions

    Time: 3:30 pm-5:30 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Joseph Godges, PT, DPT, RobRoy L. Martin, PT, PhD, Christopher R. Carcia, PT, PhD, SCS, OCS, James W. Matheson, PT, DPT

    Level: Intermediate

    The International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) is a unified model of functioning and disability that was recently developed by the World Health Organization. The ICF provides standard language and a framework for the description of health and health-related states in terms of body structure and function, activity, and participation in life situations. The ICF provides a useful framework for PTs to direct the examination, treatment, and evaluation of patients. In 2006, the Orthopaedic Section of APT undertook a project to develop evidence-based guidelines, based on the ICF model, for the examination and treatment of common musculoskeletal conditions. The purpose of this presentation is to summarize the status of this project, including clinical practice guidelines on the physical therapist management of plantar fasciitis, achilles tendinitis, and ankle sprains. In addition, the speakers will discuss strategies to integrate evidence-based practice guidelines into clinical practice.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Provide an overview of the project to develop evidence-based clinical practice guidelines for the management of orthopedic conditions commonly treated by physical therapists.
    • Discuss the ICF terminology and how the interrelationships between movement, function, impairments, activity restrictions, and participation levels are presented in these guidelines.
    • Present several examples of published ICF clinical practice guidelines.
    • Discuss how these guidelines may serve as a resource to physical therapists, clinical instructors, clinical faculty, academic faculty, researchers, claims reviewers, and policy makers.
    • Discuss strategies for implementing these guidelines into clinical practice.
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