Archive: CSM 2012: Pediatrics Programming

  • This is archived programming for CSM 2012. See current programming.

    Browse Pediatrics sessions by day. Return to the main topic menu.

    Wednesday, February 8 | Thursday, February 9 | Friday, February 10 | Saturday, February 11

    * Should you choose to preselect sessions during the registration process, please be advised that preselection is not a guarantee of a seat. Attendees are asked to preselect to better determine room size and all efforts will be made to accommodate sessions in the largest rooms possible. All attendees are encouraged to show up to sessions early. Attendees are also encouraged to select alternative sessions in the event their first choice is full.

    Wednesday, February 8 (Preconference)

    The Child's Developing Brain: Emerging Neuroscience and Its Therapeutic Implications

    Time: 8:00 am-5:30 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Mary Ann Sharkey, PT, PhD, MS

    Level: Intermediate

    Preconference Pricing: Standard

    CEUs: 0.8 (8 contact hours/CCUs)

    Over the past 2 decades, neuroscience as a field has changed our understanding of the brain and its development. The impact of new imaging and genetic testing has led to a better understanding of the development of the child's brain. This course will focus on the newest changes in brain research and provide a forum for implications that these findings might have on our therapeutic intervention with the young child with disabilities. Whether it be a sensory, perceptual, or motor problem, the understanding of the brain is essential to critical decision making concerning the focus of intervention.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Describe the gross anatomical components and relationship of the nervous system.
    • Discuss plasticity and its impact throughout development.
    • Explain the impact of sensory input on the developing brain, anatomically and behaviorally.
    • Describe the effects of early stress and pain on brain development and its impact across the lifespan.
    • Identify the mechanisms that effect motor output in relation to tone, movement, and feedforward.
    • Correlate the relationship between sensory, perception, and motor functions in the brain and the impact it makes for clinical decision making in pediatrics.
    • Explain motor systems as it relates to the dynamic relationship between anatomical, neurological, and mechanical influences.
    • Identify treatment strategies which would be pertinent to an individual child as related to concepts learned in this workshop.

    Advances in Developmental Orthopedics: Influences of the Somatosensory

    Time: 8:00 am-5:30 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Beverly Cusick, PT, MS

    Level: Intermediate

    Preconference Pricing: Standard

    CEUs: 0.8 (8 contact hours/CCUs)

    This introductory program will feature an overview of pediatric orthopedic issues, including skeletal modeling mechanisms and influences, the benefits of full-term gestation as a biomechanical basis for optimum skeletal modeling, selected movement-driven skeletal design as a biomechanical basis for optimum skeletal modeling, and the influences of body weight distribution and somatosensory input on antigravity motor skills acquisition and skeletal modeling. The speakers will present the fundamentals of S.A. Sahrmann's muscle balance theory as they manifest in skeletal modeling of the torso and lower extremities, as well as musculoskeletal assessment procedures used to detect skeletal modeling errors and to monitor management effects. These principles and events are applied to pathomechanics commonly observed in children with neuromotor disorders. Video case studies will illustrate the relevance of the findings obtained in musculoskeletal assessment.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Distinguish between skeletal maturation and skeletal modeling.
    • Distinguish between strain and load, and apply this distinction to the "Golden Age."
    • Describe the modeling effects of compression, tension, and loaded, torsional, torque strains.
    • Bring the issues of somatosensory input, practice, and related cortical mapping to the process of postural control and movement skills acquisition.
    • Explain the influence of normal neonatal hip constraints on the development of normal spine curves and lower-extremity alignment.
    • Discuss the sequential acquisition of antigravity muscle function in the torso.

    Thursday, February 9

    Measuring Outcomes: Section on Pediatrics Practice Forum

    Time: 8:00 am-10:00 am (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Connie Johnson, PT, DScPT, Mary Anne Leginus, PT, MEd, Deb Rose, PT, DPT, PCS, Colleen Coulter, PT, DPT, PhD, PCS

    Level: Intermediate

    Outcome measures are an important part of physical therapist practice to demonstrate the success of our interventions. In this forum, presenters from hospital, early intervention, and school-based practice settings will demonstrate how they measure outcomes and share the results of an outcome project. A practice/case study format will be followed by facilitated small-group discussions. Participants will discuss current outcomes measures, how data is collected, and its impact on physical therapist practice. Barriers to and facilitators of outcome measurement will be discussed. By attending this course, physical therapists will learn how pediatric physical therapists are measuring outcomes in their practice settings.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Define the attributes of an outcome measure.
    • Explain the importance of utilizing outcome measures in pediatric physical therapist practice.
    • Identify barriers to and facilitators of outcome measurement in pediatric physical therapy.
    • Describe how practitioners collect and use outcome measure data in pediatric hospital, early intervention, and school-based practice settings.
    • Discuss assessments and tools appropriate for use as outcome measurement in pediatric hospital, early intervention, and school-based practice settings .
    • Reflect, discuss, and develop ideas to use outcome measures in their clinical practice.

    Assistive Technology: Tools to Promote Participation Across the Lifespan

    Time: 8:00 am-10:00 am (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Maria Jones, PT, PhD 

    Level: Multiple Level

    Infants/toddlers, children, adolescents, and adults with developmental disabilities have the need for assistive technology across the lifespan to promote participation in activities and routines. This session will review the legal mandates for assistive technology and explore the role of the physical therapy in exploring assistive technology options throughout a person's life span. Attendees will learn the decision-making frameworks that guide assistive technology assessment and recommendations to promote participation within home, school, community, and vocational environments. The speakers will discuss funding considerations and coordination of funding requests.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Comply with the legal mandates for assistive technology.
    • Apply decision-making frameworks that guide assistive technology assessment and recommendations.
    • Identify a range of assistive technology options and explain the role of the PT in exploring those options.
    • Secure funding for assistive technology that people with developmental disabilities require across the lifespan.

    Growth Velocity for Determining Biological/Developmental Age: Why It Is Important for Athletic Development in Children

    Time: 8:00 am-10:00 am (See Program for Room)

    (Joint Program: Orthopaedics)

    Speaker: Jon P. Rhodes, PT, DPT, MBA 

    Level: Basic

    This session will review of the recent literature and research, and the speaker will relate personal experiences with measuring and utilizing the information of growth velocity and the windows of trainability. Growth velocity is directly linked to the developmental/biological age of athletes and can be used to predict developmental age. This information is very valuable to a coach, parent, or physical therapist who works with the athletic ability of children. All of those who work with children should be monitoring growth velocity in order to adapt training accordingly. Many experts believe that there are sensitive periods or critical times in every child's life where certain skills can be learned at an accelerated rate. It is a window of opportunity that we would not want to miss. This can help explain why one child may accelerate faster than another child when learning an exercise or drill. 'Participants will learn about Balyi and Way's Five S's that have windows of optimal training: 1) stamina, 2) strength; 3) speed; 4) skill; and 5) suppleness (mobility).

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Define growth velocity and relate its importance to physical development.
    • Discuss long-term athletic development and its implication for physical therapy.
    • Discuss windows of trainability/opportunity.
    • Explain the Five S's of trainability.
    • Describe psychology and growth velocity.
    • Explore gender differences in growth velocity, how boys and girls develop at different rates.
    • Discuss the Matthew effect or the relative age effect and how to potential diminish this effect in the real world.
    • Show real-world experience in working with children to help maximize the windows of opportunity.

    Moving to Learn, Learning to Move: A New Perspective on Developmental Intervention

    Time: 10:30 am-12:30 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Regina Harbourne, PT, PhD, PCS, Cole Galloway, PT, PhD, Jana Iverson, PhD 

    Level: Intermediate

    Cognition, perception, and action are inextricably linked and emerge together during development, driven by infants' active exploration of the physical and social world. This is the theory of the embodied mind. As a result, the ability to bang an object builds language, development of sitting drives visual perceptual development. and crawling and walking drive a variety of cognitive and social changes. This realization has significant clinical impact, considering that movement impairments place children at risk for general developmental delays. Alternatively, any gains in movement abilities allow for potential gains across development. This session will examine the interaction of the developing mind and the developing motor system and introduce strategies to capitalize on the embodied mind to provide enhanced intervention. The speakers will present comprehensive evidence for the inclusion of the embodied mind perspective in clinical practice, including key principles that are useful to advance developmental intervention. Specific tasks ranging from sitting and reaching, to language and gesture, to power mobility and socialization will be highlighted. Application to developmental disorders such as cerebral palsy, autism, and spina bifida, and implications for assessment, goal-setting, and intervention strategies will be discussed.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Discuss the theory and empirical support for the use of the "'embodied mind'" as a foundation for developmental intervention.
    • Analyze critical points of interaction between early motor behavior and perceptual/cognitive/language changes.
    • Compare and contrast the embodied mind perspective to a general developmental perspective to design a program for assisting developmental change in commonly seen diagnoses such as cerebral palsy, spina bifida, and autism.
    • Discuss hypothetical and actual interventions using specific case studies of infants with various diagnoses.

    Rehabilitation Protocols and Training for Gait Before and After Single Event Multilevel Surgery

    Time: 10:30 am-12:30 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Jean Stout, PT, MS, Katie Walt, PT, DPT 

    Level: Multiple Level

    This course will summarize the role of physical therapy both before and after single-event multilevel surgery. The speakers will present their rehabilitation experience with children with cerebral palsy, as well as treatment aspects from initial gait analysis and preoperative teaching to specific postoperative protocols. Discussion will include the role of an inpatient rehabilitation episode of care and the patient selection process, as well as a description of lever-arm dysfunction and its influence on muscle function. Attendees will learn training strategies for stance phase muscles and swing phase muscles. Case studies will illustrate and emphasize treatment approaches.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Describe how lever-arm dysfunction impacts muscle function and ability to strengthen before surgery.
    • Discuss specific postoperative treatment protocols for bony and/or soft tissue procedures after single-event multilevel surgery.
    • Implement different gait training strategies for stance phase and swing phase muscles.
    • Identify patients who may benefit from an inpatient rehabilitation episode of care and describe components of the program structure.
    • Discuss goal setting and patient/family expectations.

    Clinical Reasoning in Pediatrics: Tools For Entry-Level and Residency Education

    Time: 3:30 pm-5:30 pm (See Program for Room)

    (Joint Program: Education)

    Speakers: Jennifer Furze, PT, DPT, Kelly Nelson, PT, DPT, PCS, Gail M. Jensen, PT, PhD, FAPTA, Kendra L. Gagnon, PT, PhD 

    Level: Multiple Level

    In a dynamic health care environment, the profession needs to prepare students with effective and efficient clinical decision-making abilities, from entry-level through postprofessional education. Physical therapist educators must deliberately plan a progression of learning experiences that facilitate competent development of students' clinical-reasoning process as a non-negotiable tenet of pediatric physical therapist practice. Research shows that students learn, develop, and retain knowledge best through experiences that are well integrated with clinical practice. This strong bridge between the academic and clinical community as a community of practice is a meaningful and essential learning environment. This session will apply a developmental framework for developing clinical-reasoning abilities and describe the deliberate integration of community-based educational experiences across the pediatric curriculum, from entry- level to residency education. The World Health Organization International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health (ICF) serves as a framework to assist students in this progressive development of clinical reasoning skills. Curriculum exemplars will demonstrate the application, progression, and integration of this framework along with methods to assess clinical reasoning across entry-level and residency physical therapist education in pediatrics. Participants will engage in critical analysis and reflection of the exemplars and determine action steps for implementation at their sites.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Describe the interdependent role of knowledge use and application with clinical reasoning and reflection in pediatric PT practice.
    • Discuss and apply teaching and learning strategies for facilitating the development of clinical reasoning and reflection in pediatric PT practice across the curriculum, from entry-level to residency education.
    • Integrate the ICF framework into a variety of learning experiences to assess clinical reasoning across entry-level and residency education.
    • Identify community-based educational experiences that facilitate the development of clinical skills across the continuum of pediatric PT education.
    • Utilize assessment strategies to design implementation of clinical reasoning methods across the continuum of pediatric physical therapy.

    *OVER CAPACITY -- Evidence to Practice: Optimizing Walking Outcomes for Young Children With Neuromotor Impairment

    Time: 3:30 pm-5:30 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Katrin Mattern-Baxter, PT, DPT, Denise M. Begnoche, PT, DPT 

    Level: Intermediate

    Parents of young children with a chronic neurological condition place a high priority on the attainment of walking. The purpose of this course is to introduce a model of determinants for walking readiness in young children with cerebral palsy and review evidence-based interventions for over-ground and treadmill walking, including home-based intensive treadmill training protocols. Reliable and valid tools to predict and measure walking outcomes will be discussed. The course will include results from the authors' own research studies. Case presentations of children with neuromotor impairment will illustrate intervention activities via audio-visual materials.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Review evidence on locomotor treadmill training in children with neuromotor impairment.
    • Apply reliable and valid tools to predict and measure walking outcomes in clinical practice.
    • Discuss infant locomotion and identify indicators of readiness for task-specific practice of walking.
    • Utilize parameters of intensive locomotor treadmill training to promote the acquisition and refinement of walking.
    • Be introduced to a new method of assessing readiness to learn walking in children with neuromotor disorders.
    • Apply task-specific practice of gait training over ground to maximize potential for least supportive walking.
    • Explore translation of current research findings into pediatric physical therapist practice.

    Participation-based Therapy for Children With Physical Disabilities

    Time: 3:30 pm-5:30 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Lisa A. Chiarello, PT, PhD, PCS, Robert J. Palisano, PT, ScD 

    Level: Intermediate

    This course will present a model for optimal participation and a framework for intervention and engage participants in appraisal and discussion of application to practice. The participation-based approach is innovative both in focus and the manner in which services are provided. The approach is goal-oriented, strength-based, and ability-focused, with an emphasis on real-life experiences. Interventions are short-term and initiated when there is readiness to achieve specific goals for home and community participation. The therapist is a consultant, collaborating with the child, family, and community providers. The therapist shares information, educates, and instructs in ways that build child, family, and community capacity. Outcomes include achievement of goals for home and community participation, child self-determination, and parent psychological empowerment. Case reports will be used to illustrate application to practice and engage participants in discussion.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Apply research and theory on optimizing the desired home and community participation of children with physical disabilities.
    • Describe processes associated with enabling children, families, and communities.
    • Develop strategies and procedures for providing children real-life experiences to promote their self-determination and desired participation.
    • Promote the PT's dual role of consultant and collaborator.

    Friday, February 10

    Physical Therapy Management of a Child With Idiopathic Toe Walking

    Time: 8:00 am-10:00 am (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Sally P. Le Cras, PT, MSPT, PCS, Shannon Brausch, PT, Julie Bouck, PT, MPT, Amy Taylor-Haas, PT, MPT 

    Level: Basic

    An evidence-based clinical practice guideline (CPG) for children aged 2 to 21 years with idiopathic toe walking (ITW) was developed as a collaboration between physical therapists at Cincinnati Children's Hospital (Cincinnati, Ohio) and Primary Children's Hospital (Salt Lake City, Utah). The CPG is based on current evidence and over 50 research articles were reviewed in the development of this document. The CPG outlines the etiology of ITW, exclusions for this diagnosis and use of the CPG, physical therapy evaluation components, physical therapy management of these patients, and outcome measures for children with idiopathic toe walking. The CPG also includes algorithms for screenings in order to refer patients as appropriate to specialty medical practitioners and for physical therapy treatment based on objective measures. This session will discuss the development of the CPG, including the relevant search and grading criteria for articles, as well as the body of literature to support the recommendations in the guideline will be presented. The specific recommendations for referral to physical therapy for children with ITW, screenings, evaluation, treatment, and discharge will be shared. Finally, electronic access to the CPG will be provided.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Demonstrate an understanding of the etiology, incidence, and current evidence regarding physical therapy management of idiopathic toe walking (ITW) in children.
    • Identify the recommended screenings for referrals to speciality physicians or other medical professionals for children with ITW.
    • Verbalize key evidence-based recommendations from the clinical practice guideline (CPG) for children with ITW.
    • Identify the recommended components of the PT evaluation for children with ITW, including history gathering and measurements.
    • Identify the recommended physical therapy management strategies for children with ITW based on objective measures.
    • Identify outcome measurements for children with ITW.

    Interdisciplinary Care Current Concepts of Individuals With Osteogenesis Imperfecta Throughout the Life Span

    Time: 8:00 am-10:00 am (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Lisa C. Drefus, PT, DPT, Frances Baratta-Ziska, PT, MS, PCS, Cathleen L. Raggio, MD

    Level: Intermediate

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is commonly a genetic skeletal disorder of type I collagen. Recent medicine has identified 9 different types of OI. Individuals with moderate to severe OI commonly experience multiple fractures, muscle weakness, and skeletal deformities, which challenge mobility throughout their lifespan. In the last decade medical advancements of pharmacological treatment, surgical rodding, earlier genetic testing, and rehabilitation have resulted in improved mobility in individuals with OI. A key to success is an interdisciplinary team approach in treatment, physical therapy plays a crucial role in parent and family education, strengthening, and advancing mobility from birth into adulthood. However, this can be a challenging population to treat and predict changes in mobility across the years due to their high risk of fractures and bone deformity. This session informs participants of current research and advances in medical treatment, and discusses the role of physical therapy in the interdisciplinary care of individuals with OI. Emphasis is on evaluation tips, treatment interventions, and case studies of changes in functional mobility in individuals with OI across the lifespan.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Describe the pathology of OI and the newest OI types identified (I-IX).
    • Discuss current literature and research regarding medical advances related to OI including pharmacological treatment, orthopedic intervention, genetic testing, rehabilitation, and orthotics.
    • Describe the role of the Skeletal Dysplasia Center at the Hospital for Special Surgery in providing interdisciplinary care for individuals with OI.
    • Identify components of comprehensive examinations of patients with OI, recognize clinical characteristics of OI, and discuss function as it affects the individual's daily activities including mobility precautions.
    • Differentiate current rehabilitation treatment techniques for individuals with various types of OI throughout the lifespan.
    • Recommend appropriate OI nutritional requirements and physical activity plans for individuals of all ages and levels of mobility.

    *OVER CAPACITY -- Linking Physical Activity to Early Intervention in Children With Down Syndrome

    Time: 8:00 am-10:00 am (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Julia Looper, PT, PhD, Meghann Lloyd, PhD 

    Level: Basic

    Children and infants with Down syndrome (DS) have delayed motor skill development (including motor milestones and fundamental motor skills); they also engage in less physical activity than their age-matched peers. Research is beginning to show that there is a connection between early intervention and physical activity. This session explores the link between these 2 aspects of physical therapy practice. It focuses on the need for early intervention for infants and children with DS, including evidence for specific early interventions, such as treadmill training and orthoses,. The presenters will explain how early interventions and physical activity affect the motor development of children with DS, and how physical activity affects social, cognitive, and motor development. The presenters will further explain how the interventions you use with your patients with DS influence the children's later physical activity and why it is important to consider physical activity when treating children.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Discuss current early motor interventions for infants and children with DS.
    • Explain the reciprocal influence of activity on motor development and motor development on activity.
    • Promote motor development and physical activity in young children with DS in your own practice.

    Anticipatory Postural Control in Children, Part 1: Updating the Evidence

    Time: 10:30 am-12:30 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Gay L. Girolami, PT, MS, Takako Shiratori, PT, DPT, PhD 

    Level: Intermediate

    Postural preparation, anticipatory postural adjustments (APAs), and compensatory postural adjustments (CPAs) have been identified as components necessary to maintain balance when performing voluntary movement. Each of these postural strategies has a different, yet significant role in postural control and each is associated with a specific time frame in relation to a focal movement. APA research in adults is well-established, but until recently little was known about the organization of APAs in children with typical development and children with cerebral palsy. Part 1 of this course will allow attendees to recognize the similarities and differences in the APAs of children and adults. In addition, the speakers will address the similarities and differences in the organization of APAs in children with typical and atypical motor development.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Describe similarities and differences in the APAs of children and adults.
    • List similarities and differences in the organization of APAs in children with typical and atypical motor development.

    Knowledge Translation: A Great Idea, But How Do We Overcome People's Conservatism?

    Time: 10:30 am-12:30 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Peter Rosenbaum, MD, Virginia Wright, PT, PhD 

    Level: Basic

    In the 21st century, we have been conditioned to manage our health services activities in what people have referred to as the "hyphenated" world of clinical practice. For example, we are expected to be "family-centered," "evidence-based" (or "evidence-informed"), and engaged in evaluating "patient-related outcomes." These phrases trip off the tongue so easily, and are so much a part of the discourse, that it is easy to think that we know what we are talking about, and more importantly, that we are doing all of these good things! Of course, we "know" how to do all of these things by virtue of the "knowledge" that "they" (the researchers and teachers) are "translating" to the rest of us! In this combined presentation, the speakers will offer some challenges to these notions-ones that we believe apply to all of us, whether we are front-line practitioners, program managers, teachers, researchers, and, yes, knowledge translators!

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Address what we see to be some of the key steps in the chain of KT.
    • Identify where there are challenges and weak links
    • .
    • Explore opportunities to strengthen the links.
    • Discuss why we believe this is both possible and important.

    Section on Pediatrics Diagnosis Task Force: Member Forum on Development of Pediatic Diagostic Language

    Time: 10:30 am-12:30 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Kathy Martin, PT, DHS, Ann VanSant, PT, PhD, FAPTA, Sally Westcott McCoy, PT, PhD, Brian Wrotniak, PT, PhD 

    Level: Intermediate

    This session begins with an overview of the work to date of the Diagnosis Task Force for the Section on Pediatrics. To continue the development of diagnoses for pediatric physical therapists, participants will engage in roundtable discussions to formulate proposed diagnostic language for several common pediatric conditions.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Explain education/information regarding Diagnosis Task Force group.
    • Apply task force guidelines for the pediatric practitioner on the process of diagnosing movement dysfunction in children.
    • Contribute to the development of template language for several pediatric conditions, including idiopathic toe walking, pediatric balance dysfunction, rib cage deformities with impaired ventilation, and mobility dysfunction in the school setting.
    • Establish pediatric physical therapist networks for developing and proposing diagnoses with descriptions of the conditions.
    • Help establish pediatric movement system diagnoses, including use of commonly accepted language, labeling, and format recommendations.

    Anticipatory Postural Control in Children, Part 2: Implications for Clinical Practice

    Time: 3:30 pm-5:30 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Gay L. Girolami, PT, MS, Takako Shiratori, PT, DPT, PhD 

    Level: Intermediate

    Recent research describing anticipatory postural adjustments (APAs) in children deepens our knowledge regarding this component of postural control. Examining the evidence creates the opportunity to translate research into clinical practice. This purpose of Part 2 of this course is to review the latest research on APAs in children with typical development and cerebral palsy, discuss translation of APA research findings and the implications for clinical practice, and present ideas for treatment based on the research evidence.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Summarize the research findings that have immediate implications for clinical practice.
    • Apply those findings to design treatment strategies to address feed-forward postural control in infants and children with neurological conditions.

    Development and Appraisal of Clinical Practice Guidelines: A Progress Update on Congenital Muscular Torticollis Guidelines

    Time: 3:30 pm-5:30 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Sandra L. Kaplan, PT, PhD, Colleen Coulter-O'Berry, PT, PhD, Linda Fetters, PT, PhD, FAPTA 

    Level: Intermediate

    This session first describes the structure of evidence-based guidelines, repositories available to pediatric clinicians, methods of critical appraisal of guidelines, and the process of developing evidence-based guidelines for public use. The session continues with an update on the development of the Congenital Muscular Torticollis Clinical Practice Guideline and other Section on Pediatrics guideline initiatives.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Identify the structure and formats of evidence-based guidelines.
    • Identify guideline repositories.
    • Describe the role of guidelines in clinical practice.
    • Examine methods of critical appraisal of guidelines and recommendations.
    • Review the current status of the Clinical Practice Guideline (CPG) for Congenital Muscular Torticollis (CMT).
    • Identify the next steps in the process for completing the CPG on CMT.
    • Describe the process of developing additional guidelines for the Section on Pediatrics.

    Supporting Motor Function, Self-Care Abilities, Participation, and Playfulness of Young Children With Cerebral Palsy

    Time: 3:30 pm-5:30 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Doreen Bartlett, PT, PhD, MSc, Lisa Chiarello, PT, PhD, PCS, Robert J. Palisano, PT, ScD, Sarah Westcott, PT, PhD 

    Level: Intermediate

    The purpose of this course is to review newly developed clinical tools and the results of a multisite, observational cohort study conducted in Canada and the United States. This study investigated child, family, and service determinants of motor function, self-care abilities, and participation of 430 preschool children with cerebral palsy (CP), stratified by functional ability. Based on the Gross Motor Function Classification System, the sample is representative of children in population-based studies conducted around the world; therefore, these results have wide-spread generalizability. Through an interactive format, implications for goal setting and intervention planning will be explored for children with a range of physical abilities. PTs can expect to provide more holistic, comprehensive, and evidence-based care by incorporating this new knowledge into practice when working with young children with CP and their families.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Describe the conceptual model of the Move and PLAY study.
    • Identify the range of measures that are available to gather information on child and family attributes.
    • Explain the varying contributions of child, family, and service factors to subsequent motor function, self-care abilities, participation, enjoyment, and play of young children with cerebral palsy.
    • Differentiate determinants that are amenable to change from those that are not.
    • Propose determinants that assist with realistic goal setting for children who have the potential to walk without mobility aides and those who will use assistive devices for mobility.
    • Apply determinants to intervention planning for children with different potentials for walking and self-mobility.

    Saturday, February 11

    Perception-Action Approach: An Intervention Promoting Variability, Adaptability, and Complexity

    Time: 8:00 am-10:00 am (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Mary Rahlin, PT, DHS, PCS, Barbara Womack, PT, MA, Joyce Barnett, PT

    Level: Multiple Level

    This educational session is designed to introduce the participants to a therapeutic approach for infants and children with movement disorders. This approach is based in Perception-Action Theory and recognizes the importance of variability and complexity in the developmental process as highlighted in current literature. The environmental design and therapeutic guidance are combined to promote spontaneous exploration that leads to the emergence of new movement strategies. Relevant current literature and research evidence will be presented. Recent examination of intervention efficacy has pointed toward the success of a perception-action approach in producing optimal learning and improved outcomes in children with movement disorders.  A case video discussion will illustrate the application of this approach in pediatric physical therapy practice.  

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Understand the theoretical underpinnings of the Perception-Action (P-A) Approach.
    • Discuss the role of variability and complexity in the developmental process.
    • Analyze spontaneous movement in typically and atypically developing children to describe features of variability and complexity.
    • Discuss the primary concepts of the P-A Approach used to develop intervention for children with movement dysfunction.

    Dosing: Pediatrics and Brain Injury-An Update From Research Summit III

    Time: 8:00 am-10:00 am (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Jill Heathcock, MPT, PhD, Jennifer Christy, PT, PhD, Mary Gannotti, PT, PhD, Thubi A. Kolobe, PT, PhD, FAPTA 

    Level: Multiple Level

    This course will include an overview of the "state of the science" of pediatric brain injury and dosing. Specific developmental diagnoses, such as cerebral palsy, will be discussed in the context of frequency, intensity, and duration of successful and unsuccessful intervention programs. An overview of Research Summit III will include future directions for research and clinical pediatric practice. Lecture and large-group discussion will enable attendees to address future multi-site research studies and their application for use in clinical practice.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Use the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health in guiding rehabilitation research for children with an injured brain.
    • Analyze the current literature related to brain injury in pediatrics.
    • Discuss the clinical significance of dosing in a pediatric patient with an injured brain.
    • Discuss the significance of evidence-based practice and multi-site trials.
    • Recognize the role of Research Summit III.
    • Analyze the outcomes of Research Summit III.

    Dianne Cherry Forum: Teaching PT Students to Meet the Needs of Individuals' With Life Long Disabilities

    Time: 8:00 am-10:00 am (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Dale Deubler, PT, MS, Jennifer Fruze, PT, DPT, Ellen Spake, PT, PhD, Robin Dole, PT, DPT, EdD, PCS

    Level: Multiple Level

    This forum honors the memory of Dianne Cherry, a pediatric physical therapist and educator, by annually addressing a topic of significance in pediatric physical therapy education at CSM.  The forum will include brief presentations by faculty who have incorporated a variety of aspects of scholarship in teaching and learning into their work. In addition, problems relating to developing. A panel discussion will follow the presentations that will engage the audience in information sharing and further development of pertinent topics, leading to a more comprehensive exploration of the topic. Opportunities for collaboration will be explored.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Distinguish between teaching patient management of children and adults with life-long disabilities.
    • Compare and contrast the needs of pediatric patients with adults who have life-long disabilities.
    • Demonstrate awareness of how PT and PTA students learn about adults with life-long disabilities.
    • Self-evaluate whether current courses and clinical education experiences could include more opportunities for learning about adults with life-long disabilities.
    • Identify resources to assist pediatric physical therapist educators and clinical instructors in developing research agendas that include topics related to teaching and learning.       

    Measuring Physical Activity and Fitness in Persons with Cerebral Palsy: Lifespan Approaches in Physical Therapy

    Time: 8:00 am-10:00 am (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Margaret O'Neil, PT, PhD, MPH, Maria Fragala-Pinkham, PT, MS, Kristie F. Bjornson, PT, PhD, PCS, Nancy Lennon, PT, MS, Deborah Thorpe, PT, PhD, PCS 

    Level: Intermediate

    This course provides clinicians with measurement protocols for outcome effectiveness in activity-based interventions for children and youth with cerebral palsy (CP). The presenters define fitness and physical activity and discuss laboratory and field-based measures. The presenters are researchers and clinicians who have done an extensive literature review to identify measures useful to clinicians. Although CP is non-progressive, children with CP often experience decreased physical activity secondary to growth and development. Despite limitations, most youth with CP are ambulatory and classified as Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS) levels I, II, or III. Individuals with CP have decreased aerobic fitness (VO2 peak), which limits daily activity and may impact health. Impairments and activity limitations associated with CP that contribute to decreased fitness include spasticity and poor motor control, muscle weakness, and muscle contractures. There are no accepted, standardized laboratory or field (clinic) aerobic fitness/physical activity measurement protocols for individuals with CP, although recent publications have presented new protocols. Presenters will review the current "state of the science" in fitness and physical activity measures for children and youth with CP. They will provide clinical examples of interventions and feasible measures for clinical application.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Distinguish between measures of health-related and performance-based fitness, physical activity, and participation.
    • Identify reliable and valid aerobic and anaerobic fitness measures for children and youth with CP across GMFCS levels.
    • Identify reliable and valid physical activity measures for children and youth with CP across the GMFCS levels.
    • Translate research on measurement methodology into practice by choosing outcome measures that are feasible, systematic, and rigorous.

    Neurobehavioral Outcomes in Pre-term Infants Following the ATVV (Auditory, Tactile, Visual, and Vestibular) Intervention

    Time: 10:30 am-12:30 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Rosemary White-Traut, PhD, RN, FAAN

    Level: Intermediate

    The speakers will review the behavioral state, prefeeding behaviors, sucking organization, and motor development responses of pre-term infants using the ATVV intervention.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Describe the ATVV intervention.
    • Identify infants who may be appropriate for ATVV intervention.
    • Describe developmental outcomes associates with ATVV intervention.

    Single-Subject Research Reporting and Reviewing

    Time: 10:30 am-12:30 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Ann VanSant, PT, PhD, FAPTA, Carolyn Heriza, PT, EdD, FAPTA 

    Level: Intermediate

    This workshop will provide both potential authors and journal article reviewers an opportunity to review the characteristics of well-designed and reported single-subject research studies. Attendees are encouraged to bring their work, outlines, questions, and concerns. There will be time to interact with the instructors one on one.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Describe the characteristics of well-designed, single-subject research.
    • With the use of an outline, recognize the expectations for clear reporting of single-subject research.

    Understanding Pediatric Physical Therapy Practice and Its Effects on Long-Term Outcomes, Part 1

    Time: 10:30 am-12:30 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Takako Shiratori, PT, PhD, Lynn Steffes, PT, DPT, Gay L. Girolami, PT, MS, Sarah W. McCoy, PT, PhD, Lynn Jeffries, PhD, PCS, Shruti Joshi, PT, MS

    Level: Intermediate

    Recent innovations in information technology have led to increased use of electronic health care records. Among the many needs served by these systems, the following may be highly relevant/useful for pediatric physical therapy practice: understanding the relationship of intervention and functional outcomes, follow-ups of specific populations across the lifespan, assisting pediatric therapists' clinical reasoning and decision making, and prognostic information for families of children who receive physical therapy. There are several stakeholders interested in this process. Part 1 of this series will focus on insurance companies and third-party payers, administrators, clinicians, and researchers as stakeholders. The primary focus of this course will be payment and compliance parameters for pediatric documentation and parameters to capture quality of care and potential applications for mentoring novice therapists and students.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Identify payment and compliance parameters for pediatric documentation.
    • Identify parameters to capture quality of care.
    • Identify parameters to explore potential applications for mentoring novice therapists and students.

    Interactions Between Motor and Cognitive Development: Promoting Positive Neuroplasticity Through Physical Therapy Intervention

    Time: 3:30 pm-5:30 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Beth A. Smith, PT, DPT, PhD, Rosanne Kermoian, PhD, Ginny Paleg, PT, DScPT, MS

    Level: Intermediate

    The mechanism of use-dependent plasticity of the brain is thought to underlie the powerful behavioral changes that occur in infants and young children as a result of both enriched motor experience and motor experience deprivation. In pediatrics, study is just beginning on how interventions to improve motor skills can affect change at the neural level in typically and atypically developing infants and young children. This relative lack of experimental evidence creates a challenge for pediatric physical therapists wanting to incorporate principles for promoting positive neuroplasticity into their interventions. This session discusses what current research does and does not say about how motor experience interacts with cognitive development in infants and young children with typical and atypical development. The presenters will discuss what currently is known about how the brain changes at the ICF impairment level as developing skills interact at the activity and participation levels. Topics include supine reaching and grasping, kicking, sitting and reaching, crawling, walking, vision and visual perception, spatial memory, object permanence, and age of acquisition. Finally, the session offers suggestions for applying principles of neuroplasticity to increase the effectiveness of intervention, focusing on early power mobility, and treadmill-based and overground training.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Describe theoretical and empirical evidence that supports early intervention to promote positive neural plasticity and support optimal motor and cognitive development in infants and young children with atypical development.
    • Explain to parents how their child's brain changes in response to new motor skill acquisition.
    • Suggest feasible evidence-based intervention techniques to promote positive neural plasticity for optimal motor and cognitive development in infants and young children with atypical development.

    Understanding Pediatric Physical Therapy Practice and Its Effects on Long-Term Outcomes, Part 2: Merging Clinical, Research, and Compliance Requirements Into Pediatric Clinical Documentation Framework

    Time: 3:30 pm-5:30 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Takako Shiratori, PT, PhD, Lynn Steffes, Gay L. Girolami, PT, MS, Sarah W. McCoy, Lynn Jeffries, PhD, PCS, Shruti Joshi, MS

    Level: Intermediate

    As many pediatric rehabilitation facilities move toward the use of electronic health record, it is timely and pertinent to develop a pediatric rehabilitation documentation framework that can meet the needs addressed in Part 1 of this course. The purpose of Part 2 is to present and discuss the necessary components of a pediatric physical therapy documentation framework that will accomplish the needs of third-party payer/policy requirements, bring about improvements in clinical practice, and accommodate the requirements of various scientific research designs.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Identify research methodologies in order to align data collection for analysis of long-term outcomes.
    • Describe examples of documentation frameworks that encompass the above components.
    • Review the components and parameters that may be important for different pediatric rehabilitation settings.

    Practice-based Evidence (PBE) and Applications for Pediatric Clinical Practice

    Time: 3:30 pm-5:30 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Amanda I. Karlsson, PT, DPT, Amy Bates, PT, DPT 

    Level: Basic

    The Clinical Practice Improvement (CPI) approach is an observational research methodology intended to create evidence-based protocols focused on patient characteristics, process steps, and outcomes. Recent publications report results of similar outcomes between randomized controlled trials and observational studies when analyzed using meta-analysis. The CPI model has been used to describe and characterize what clinicians actually do in physical therapy without altering the treatment itself for purposes of evaluating the effectiveness of an intervention. This model deserves consideration for use in studies where adequate numbers of subjects with the condition of interest are not available in one clinical practice site, but could be available across sites. Currently, pediatric physical therapist researchers have a study in the planning stages using these guidelines for comprehensive rehabilitation research. The speakers will introduce the attendees to the potential use of CPI methodology and its contribution to pediatric rehabilitation outcomes research.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Explain PBE methodology and its implications in contemporary rehabilitation research.
    • Recognize the relationship between PBE methodology and randomized controlled trials.
    • Demonstrate the appropriate application of PBE research.

    *OVER CAPACITY -- Understanding the Alphabet Soup That Is Congenital Muscular Dystrophy

    Time: 3:30 pm-5:30 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Minal Jain, PT, DScPT, PCS, Melissa Waite, PT, MSPT 

    Level: Basic

    This course will review the basic foundations in the diagnosis and medical management of the various forms of congenital muscular dystrophies. The speakers will discuss the role of the rehabilitation team, including physical therapists, and various rehabilitation assessments and therapeutic interventions. Case studies and future areas of clinical research will be presented to illustrate the need for physical therapy in maximizing functional outcomes and quality of life.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Reiterate the diagnostic methods and medical management of children with congenital muscular dystrophy.
    • Identify clinical signs distinguishing the various types of congenital muscular dystrophies.
    • Distinguish the physical therapy needs of this population.
    • Use assessments and therapeutic strategies to maximize a child's functional outcome and quality of life.
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