Archive: CSM 2012: Private Practice Programming

  • This is archived programming for CSM 2012. See current programming.

    Browse Private Practice sessions by day. Return to the main topic menu.

    Thursday, February 9 | Friday, February 10 | Saturday, February 11 

    * Should you choose to preselect sessions during the registration process, please be advised that preselection is not a guarantee of a seat. Attendees are asked to preselect to better determine room size and all efforts will be made to accommodate sessions in the largest rooms possible. All attendees are encouraged to show up to sessions early. Attendees are also encouraged to select alternative sessions in the event their first choice is full. 

    Thursday, February 9

    Own Your Own Future: Is an Opportunity in Private Practice for You?

    Time: 8:00 am-10:00 am (See Program for Room)

    Speaker: Lynn Steffes, PT, DPT

    Level: Basic

    As physical therapists explore opportunities to expand their professional role in autonomous practice, private practice remains an attractive option. Thoughtful questions, consideration of options, strategic professional experience, preliminary research, and planning are key elements in making an informed decision and positioning yourself to enter private practice. Attend this thought-provoking, information-rich private practice session on this life-changing, career-changing move!

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Identify multiple opportunities for entering private practice.
    • Explore, through other colleagues' experiences, the motivation, decision, challenges, rewards, and realities of entering private practice.
    • Evaluate your personal potential for private practice ownership.
    • Explore the first 7 essential steps to position your career to develop skills necessary for a future in private practice.
    • Build upon an initial outline of preliminary research and financial planning to develop a private practice start-up!

    The Year in Review and What's to Come

    Time: 10:30 am-12:30 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Helene Fearon, PT, Steve Levine, PT, DPT, MSHA

    Level: Multiple Level

    Join in a discussion of the significant events of 2011 and the changes that are to come in 2012. The panel of leaders will offer a synopsis of critical information regarding practice management, compliance, reimbursement, and legislative action followed by a discussion of key topics for 2012. This session offers a one-stop overview for practitioners to hear poignant information and discuss the expected changes for our practice and association over the next year.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Recognize the most recent changes in reimbursement as it pertains to private practice.
    • Review the most recent information regarding legislative action for the profession.
    • Utilize the benefits of APTA with a more thorough understanding of the association's purpose.

    A Critical Appraisal of Clinical Prediction Rules for Physical Therapists: Clinical Help or Hype?

    Time: 3:30 pm-5:30 pm (See Program for Room)

    (Joint Program: Orthopaedics)

    Speaker: Chad Cook, PT, PhD, MBA, OCS, FAAOMPT

    Level: Intermediate

    Clinical prediction rules (CPRs) are a mechanism of subgrouping patients into homogenous groups. They have demonstrated significant utility in diagnosis, treatment, and recognition of a prognosis, particularly with critical health care conditions where medical errors can significantly impact the patient. The explosion of CPRs within the physical therapy literature reflects the interest of therapists and researchers in identifying better mechanisms for diagnosis and treatment of challenging conditions. The intense interest in these tools, the desire of peer-reviewed journals to publish CPRs, and their promotion by select physical therapy groups have prompted the adoption of a number of clinical treatment-based CPRs in day-to-day clinical practice. However, are these tools truly useful, or are there subgrouping alternatives that do a similar or better job? Do the CPRs suffer from methodological considerations so significantly that their endorsement is purely hype? Do they truly lead to better care, and can private practice owners benefit from clinical implementation? Have derived rules held up to the scrutiny of validation? This 2-hour course will introduce attendees to the numerous CPRs and will outline the pros and cons of the most commonly identified rules. The speaker will discuss alternative options and the impact of each tool on everyday practice.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Identify which of the currently published CPRs have the greatest potential for private practice.
    • Recognize the impact of the use of a CPR in a clinical practice.
    • Recognize the effect that the rules have on clinical efficiency in private practice and on decision making.
    • Identify the different types of clinical prediction rules.
    • Determine the best and most efficient way to implement a CPR into clinical practice.
    • Recognize the effect that the use of CPRs may have on whether or not a clinical practice provides evidence-based treatment.
    • Reiterate the proper methodological mechanism for creating a clinical prediction rule.

    Friday, February 10

    The 1-Year Clinical Internship: Making Novice Physical Therapist Development Affordable

    Time: 8:00 am-10:00 am (See Program for Room)

    (Joint Program: Education)

    Speakers: Donna L. Applebaum, PT, DPT, MS, Anthony Delitto, PT, DPT, PhD, FAPTA

    Level: Intermediate

    In the face of changing regulatory standards and the economic challenges facing health care, there is an urgent need to implement clinical education models that realize our common vision for the profession and create clinical education curricula that are based on a partnership model, with a pedagogy that matches practice demands, is fiscally sound, and considers the current regulatory environment. The 1-year, paid internship model is a potential solution to these issues, and the Private Practice Section has formed a task force made up of academics and clinicians to assist in developing entry-level internship educational programs. Subsequently, there has been increased discussion across the clinical and academic communities about adopting this internship model. This session offers a forum to discuss the steps and challenges of implementing such an internship model across a variety of settings. Furthermore, because a gap exists between formal entry-level education and postprofessional residency and fellowship education, participants are encouraged to have a visioning discussion about how the internship model might exist as part of a formal trajectory for physical therapist professional development.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Describe the steps involved in planning and implementing the internship model, for the academic and clinical setting.
    • Discuss the logistics of a national match process.
    • Examine the internship in the context of an entry-level-through-postprofessional development continuum.

    Building Foundations for the Future: Engaging Students and New Professionals in Active APTA Membership and Leadership

    Time: 10:30 am-12:30 pm (See Program for Room)

    (Joint Program: Clinical Electrophysiology and Wound Management, Education)

    Speakers: Amelia J. Arundale, PT, DPT, Jeanette Elliot, Aimee Klein, Joe Black, PT, DPT, SCS, ATC, Efosa Guobadia, PT, DPT, Daniel Dale, PT, DPT

    Level: Basic

    This interactive and dynamic forum brings together students, new graduates, and professionals to answer the questions: How do leaders get their start? How do we excite students and new graduates about becoming leaders in their sections? When does the transition from section member to active and contributing section member happen for students? What is needed to help new graduates stay engaged in APTA? Through a range of activities, question-and-answer periods, and panel and small group discussions, this session will have everyone moving, thinking, planning, and changing the future of our profession.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Engage students, new graduates, and professionals in an interactive discussion of leadership, involvement, and engagement within sections.
    • Develop new ideas for the Student Assembly, new graduates, and sections in regards to leadership development and fostering the next generations of leaders.
    • Help students, new graduates, and section members connect in order to build motivational working relationships.
    • Develop personal objectives that facilitate your engagement, increased participation, and motivation to make changes.
    • Initiate discussion on dominant topics at the forefront of our profession to increase awareness and generate new ideas and perspectives.

    So Happy Together: Self-Report and Physical Performance Functional Measures

    Time: 3:30 pm-5:30 pm (See Program for Room)

    (Joint Program: Orthopaedics)

    Speakers: Chad Cook, PT, PhD, MBA, OCS, FAAOMPT, Eric Hegedus, PT, DPT, MHSc, OCS, Alexis Wright, PT, PhD

    Level: Intermediate

    Outcomes measures are essential elements of the patient/client management cycle of physical therapist practice. Studies designed to measure the validity and psychometric elements of outcomes measures have exploded in the last 30 years, and a number of strong self-report measures exist for clinical use. Physical performance functional measures have been less thoroughly studied and appear to yield recovery dimensions that are disparate to self-report outcomes measures. Physical performance functional measures are less influenced by pain, more closely represent true capacity and function as direct measures of physical utility (eg, stairs, walking, sit to stand). This session identifies appropriate self-report measures and physical performance measures, and compares and contrasts the capabilities of each. The presenters will provide case-based examples from the literature that describe how measurement of both distinct measures is necessary to truly identify change in patients' conditions.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Determine which self-report and physical performance measures provide the most efficient and appropriate psychometric properties for function and disability.
    • Explain item response theory and how it is useful in validation of multi-item instruments.
    • Identify which commonly used measures are most influenced by pain and how this alters the picture of true patient progression.
    • Decide which of the current outcomes measures are most defensible for use in documentation.
    • Consider an appropriate battery of measures for outpatient clinical practice.
    • Describe how outcomes measurement tools are validated and discuss whether or not this is a "pseudo-science."

    Saturday, February 11

    Clinical Applications of Musculoskeletal Ultrasound Imaging in the Overhead Athlete

    Time: 8:00 am-10:00 am (See Program for Room)

    (Joint Program: Sports Physical Therapy)

    Speakers: Charles A. Thigpen, PhD, Ellen Shanley, PT, PhD, OCS, Lane Bailey, PT, DPT

    Level: Multiple Level

    Musculoskeletal ultrasound imaging is emerging as a potentially valuable tool in the evaluation and rehabilitation of the shoulder and elbow in overhead athletes. Musculoskeletal ultrasound imaging can be used to augment clinical examination findings, providing more specific evaluation and targeted interventions for the overhead athlete. The speakers will discuss the theoretical constructs of ultrasonogarphy of the shoulder and elbow, including the strengths and limitations of its clinical and research applications. A detailed demonstration will encompass assessment (including tissue integrity, quality, and size) of the rotator cuff, elbow flexor tendon, ulnar collateral ligament (UCL), as well as measurement of acromiohumeral distance and humeral retrotorsion. Emphasis will be given to image acquisition and optimizing tissue visualization while differentiating normal anatomy and pathology. Therapeutic exercise intervention techniques facilitated by ultrasonography will be demonstrated using a series of case studies. These case studies will provide direct clinical application of examination and intervention options using ultrasonography to maximize clinical efficacy in the treatment of the overhead athlete.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Identify the structures and structural characteristics of the shoulder and elbow that can be clinically assessed using musculoskeletal ultrasound imaging.
    • Describe the strengths and limitations of musculoskeletal ultrasound imaging of the shoulder and elbow.
    • Identify overhead athletes that are likely to benefit from diagnostic imaging to improve clinical diagnosis and mechanism of impairments.
    • Describe the clinical application of imaging to guide intervention techniques at the shoulder and elbow.

    The Future of Physical Therapy: Autonomy and Professionalism Through Evidence-based Practice and Novel Business Models

    Time: 10:30 am-12:30 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Erik P. Meira, PT, James W. Matheson, PT, DPT, Richard Larsen, Ross Nakaji

    Level: Multiple Level

    With APTA's Vision 2020 and the progression to the DPT, physical therapists have been moving toward a more professional and autonomous status in the medical community. Unfortunately, current employment structures and business models do not support this development. Physical therapists continue to fill a role as hourly employees, often subordinate clinically and professionally to physicians and practice owners. Much of this is brought on by physical therapists' acceptance of this role in the current medical model. This presentation will provide a new professional business model for physical therapists to follow to achieve many of the Vision 2020 goals. It will include discussions on business models for private practice, developing professional relationships with other health care practitioners, integrating evidence-based practice and clinical outcomes, and the role of accountable care organizations.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Identify the professional goals of Vision 2020.
    • Describe potential business models for a physical therapy practice similar to those used by physicians.
    • Recognize the importance and application of evidence-based practice and outcome measures.
    • Develop professional relationships with other health care professionals.
    • Discuss the role of accountable care organizations.

    The Business of Chronic Pain for Physical Therapy

    Time: 3:30 pm-5:30 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Adriaan Louw, PT, MAppSc, Galen Danielson, PT, DPT, Brian Freund, PT, MPT, MBA

    Level: Basic

    It is estimated that more than 70 million Americans are affected by some form of chronic pain. This number is ever increasing. This increase of chronic pain is associated with an increased use of health care dollars and an added burden on health care providers, including physical therapists. Emerging research into neurophysiology and neurobiology of pain clearly shows that movement and bio-psycho-social professions such as physical therapy are ideal to treat these patients. The increase in chronic pain and the general patient dissatisfaction with care provided creates a unique business opportunity for physical therapists. This lecture will combine 2 worlds: pain science and business. In the first half, attendees will be provided with the increasing evidence that shows how physical therapy can assist chronic pain patients and what treatments have shown efficacy in managing some of the most challenging patients. In the second section, the speakers will address the business aspect of developing, implementing, and marketing such a program.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Recognize the epidemiological issues associated with chronic pain, including increased patient dissatisfaction.
    • Identify the latest evidence that supports physical therapy as the ideal movement and bio-psycho-social profession to take on chronic pain patients.
    • Reiterate the contents of a best-evidence pain management program.
    • Identify opportunities for the development, implementation and marketing of such a pain program to other health care providers and the public.
    • Apply the information from the course into clinical practice.
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