Archive: CSM 2012: Research Programming

  • This is archived programming for CSM 2012. See current programming.

    Browse Research sessions by day. Return to the main topic menu.

    Thursday, February 9 | Friday, February 10 | Saturday, February 11 

    * Should you choose to preselect sessions during the registration process, please be advised that preselection is not a guarantee of a seat. Attendees are asked to preselect to better determine room size and all efforts will be made to accommodate sessions in the largest rooms possible. All attendees are encouraged to show up to sessions early. Attendees are also encouraged to select alternative sessions in the event their first choice is full. 

    Thursday, February 9

    Hamstring Strain Injuries: Recommendations for Diagnosis, Rehabilitation, and Injury Prevention

    Time: 8:00 am-10:00 am (See Program for Room)

    (Joint Program: Sports Physical Therapy)

    Speakers: Bryan Heiderscheit, PT, PhD, Marc Sherry, PT, DPT, Darryl Thelen, Amy Silder, Elizabeth Chumanov

    Level: Basic

    This 21/2-hour session will provide clinicians with scientifically supported strategies for the prevention and treatment of hamstring strain injuries. After examining the biomechanics of the hamstring muscles during sprinting and factors associated with injury, the presenters will discuss long-term morphological and functional deficits with regard to re-injury risk. A thorough history and physical examination will be presented, highlighting tests with strong prognostic value. Finally, a rehabilitation program with criteria-based progression that incorporates eccentric training and lumbopelvic stabilization will be discussed and demonstrated. Throughout the session, attendees will gain insights regarding the contribution of biomechanics research findings to the advancement of clinical practice for patients with acute hamstring injuries.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Describe the biomechanical demands placed on the hamstrings during high-speed running.
    • Explain the risk factors associated with an acute hamstring strain injury and implement strategies to minimize them.
    • Identify common morphological and functional deficits that remain long-term following a hamstring strain injury.
    • Perform a thorough patient history and physical examination following an acute hamstring strain injury to guide patient management.
    • Individualize a rehabilitation program with criteria-based progression that incorporates eccentric training and lumbopelvic stabilization.
    • Minimize risk of re-injury by using the physical examination and functional performance criteria to determine when to return to sport.

    Hooked on Evidence Computer Lab

    Time: 10:30 am-12:30 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speaker: David Scalzitti, PT, PhD, OCS

    Level: Intermediate

    APTA's Hooked on Evidence is one of the premiere resources specific for evidence-based physical therapist practice. The database allows clinicians to rapidly locate extractions of research articles related to physical therapy interventions. These extractions provide the user with information related to the study design, participants, interventions, and outcomes for use in practice. This session will highlight efficient use of this resource, including the complementary nature of Hooked on Evidence and other APTA resources.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Use Hooked on Evidence to search for evidence in practice.
    • Use patient clinical scenarios to locate and evaluate evidence.
    • Assess measures of treatment effect size to locate evidence of effectiveness.

    National Osteoarthritis Datasets: Opportunities for Physical Therapists

    Time: 10:30 am-12:30 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Julie J. Keysor, PT, PhD, Kevin D. Gross, PT, ScD, FAAOMPT, Daniel K. White, PT, ScD

    Level: Multiple Level

    Ongoing large epidemiological studies afford valuable opportunities for physical therapists to gain insight into potentially modifiable risk factors for incident and progressive osteoarthritis, as well as activity and participation level outcomes among older populations. This session will review these opportunities and discuss current best evidence regarding the relationships among osteoarthritis pathology, musculoskeletal impairments, activity limitations, participation restrictions, and the environment. Presenters will focus discussion on 2 large ongoing prospective NIH-funded cohort studies: 1) the Osteoarthritis Initiative Study (OAI) (N=4769), and 2) the Multicenter Osteoarthritis Study (N=3026). OAI was initiated in 2004 and MOST was initiated in 2005. Both cohorts consist of individuals with or at risk of developing knee osteoarthritis and who have baseline and longitudinal follow-up measures of disease (radiographic, some MRI), pain, strength, alignment, physical performance, physical activity, participation, and general health and other contextual factors of the disablement process. Both cohort studies now have publically available baseline and longitudinal datasets (1-2 year follow-up) with the potential to inform physical therapist knowledge and practice.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Review the study design, sampling frame, and methods of 2 large epidemiological studies of knee osteoarthritis.
    • Summarize the evidence these and other large epidemiological studies bring to the understanding of the relationships among knee osteoarthritis pathology, musculoskeletal impairments, activity limitations, and participation restriction.
    • Explore opportunities within MOST and OAI for future research using publically available data.
    • Examine opportunities for physical therapists within other publically available datasets.

    How to Do Research in a Small Teaching College or Clinical Setting: If Not NIH, Then What?

    Time: 3:30 pm-5:30 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Deborah Backus, PT, PhD, Therese E. Johnston, PT, PhD, MBA, Roberta O'Shea, PT, PhD

    Level: Basic

    The ultimate purpose of this course is to assist in the early career development of physical therapy researchers in both academic and clinical environments. The focus of this session will be on how to build a successful research career in a smaller, perhaps non-traditional, research setting. Discussion will include identifying and targeting funding sources other than the National Institutes of Health to support research in the small teaching college or clinical setting. Attendees will learn strategies for building an infrastructure in these settings. The session will open with 2 keynote speakers addressing key issues that researchers in small college settings or the clinical environment, respectively, face when building a research career in these settings. This will be followed by discussion with a panel of early career investigators who work in a variety of settings and who have faced this challenge in the past few years. Presentations and discussion will focus on mechanisms for building a culture that supports research in these settings, from the administration to teaching faculty in small college settings, or line staff in clinical settings.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Discuss options other than NIH funding in order to support your research.
    • Implement strategies for identifying potential funding sources.
    • Define a business model for building the infrastructure and support to be productive in a small teaching college or clinical setting.

    *OVER CAPACITY -- Ask a Librarian: Improve Your Searching Skills in 90 Minutes or Less 

    (session will be repeated on Friday, February 10 at 3:30 pm in McCormick Place, Room 257)

    Time: 3:30 pm-5:30 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speaker: Gini Blodgett Birchett, MSLS

    Level: Intermediate

    Finding the research you need for the clinical services you provide can be frustrating and time-consuming. In 90 minutes, APTA's information specialist will walk you a variety of resources and searching techniques to help you find the literature you need. Using databases from APTA's Open Door portal, PubMed, and Hooked on Evidence, we will cover selecting the correct resource, incorporating Boolean connectors in your search, crafting a research question into a search query, selecting between keyword or subject searching, and refining search results. Participants should have basic experience with Web or database searching, but even researchers with an extensive searching background will come away with new knowledge and techniques.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Select the appropriate databases and resources for your clinical needs, with a brief look at clinical trials, systematic reviews, clinical scenarios, synthesized summaries, and more.
    • Identify key concepts.
    • Combine terms in a search string free-hand, as well as in a structured P-I-C-O framework.
    • Create search strings using Boolean logic and nesting.
    • Use controlled vocabularies to your advantage.
    • Search, examine results, and revise searches.

    Recipe for Future Success: How Do We Identify the Active Ingredients for Effective Locomotor Rehabilitation, Part 1

    Time: 3:30 pm-5:30 pm (See Program for Room)

    (Joint Program: Geriatrics, Neurology, Acute Care)

    Speakers: Carolynn Patten, PT, PhD, Daniel P. Ferris, PhD, Thomas (George) Hornby, PT, PhD, Andrea L. Behrman, PT, PhD, FAPTA

    Level: Intermediate

    Locomotor training (LT) is one example of a task-specific training strategy to promote recovery of walking function. Several variations of LT exist in current clinical practice, and there is decided controversy regarding both the optimal training approach and the target outcomes. Although based on principles of activity-dependent neural plasticity and originally developed for rehabilitation of individuals with incomplete spinal cord injuries, to date there is no definitive evidence of the efficacy of LT in other neurological conditions such as stroke, traumatic brain injury, or cerebral palsy. This lack of convincing clinical and research evidence raises the question of whether LT, in its current form, effectively addresses diagnosis-specific motor impairments. Intended for clinicians, researchers, and administrators, especially those who use and are experienced with LT, this session will advance participants' understanding of both the current evidence and controversies relevant to promoting locomotor recovery in patients with neurological disorders. The speakers will examine key variables in an effort to understand the "'active ingredients'" of effective therapeutic interventions. This session will include panel discussion, audience participation, and a question-and-answer period.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Provide a framework for clinical decision making as it pertains to locomotor rehabilitation.
    • Consider current controversies regarding current approaches to locomotor rehabilitation, including body-weight support systems and approaches to guidance.
    • Identify the urgent clinical questions regarding locomotor training.
    • Identify barriers to implementing current concepts, principles, and evidence in clinical practice.

    Friday, February 10

    Recipe for Future Success: How Do We Identify the Active Ingredients for Locomotor Rehabilitation, Part 2: Panel Discussion

    Time: 8:00 am-10:00 am (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Carolynn Patten, PhD, Andrea L. Behrman, PT, PhD, FAPTA, Thomas (George) Hornby, PT, PhD, Daniel P. Ferris, PhD

    Level: Intermediate

    Locomotor training (LT) is 1 example of a task-specific training strategy to promote recovery of walking function. Several variations of LT exist in current clinical practice, and there is decided controversy regarding both the optimal training approach and the target outcomes. This session builds on Part 1 as well as on the experience at CSM 2011, with a focused paned discussion, audience participation, and interaction to discuss experiences and perspectives, pose questions, and identify the barriers to implementing LT in the current clinical setting.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Provide a framework for clinical decision making as it pertains to locomotor rehabilitation.
    • Consider controversies regarding current approaches to locomotor rehabilitation including body-weight support systems and approaches to guidance.
    • Identify the urgent clinical questions regarding LT.
    • Identify barriers to implementing current concepts, principles, and evidence in clinical practice in the real world.

    RCTs on Disability Intervention in Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation: Unique Challenges and Opportunities

    Time: 10:30 am-12:30 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Jan Reynolds, Alan Jette, Sara Mulroy, PT, PhD, Jessie VanSwearingen, G. Kelley Fitzgerald, PT, PhD, FAPTA, Nancy Latham, PT, PhD

    Level: Multiple Level

    As much as 10% of the world's population and almost 20% of the US population has a disability. That percentage will only grow as the Baby Boomers age-but there still is little evidence to guide strategies to reduce activity limitations and increase participation in people with disability. That's why PTJ recently published a special series on improving the evidence base for disability intervention. In this session, authors who contributed to the series share the results of their trials and offer frank discussion about the special challenges of doing RCTs in this area. Their focuses include factors associated with participation poststroke, exercise intervention in knee osteoarthritis, the PTClinResNet database on disability outcomes, and the relationship of exercise and gait to the outcomes of activity and participation in older adults. No matter what your area of interest, you'll benefit from the experience and valuable insights of these groundbreaking authors.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Identify some of the new interventions or technological developments that have preliminary evidence of efficacy in improving participation in people with disability.
    • Describe the current state of understanding of the etiology, prevention, and treatment of secondary conditions for people with disability.
    • Explain what is known about effective ways to reduce environmental barriers for people with disability.
    • List important advances in the conceptualization, definition, and measurement of disability.
    • Discuss special issues and needs for people with a disability who are aging compared with those who develop a disability as they age.
    • Summarize the challenges in designing RCTs to investigate the effectiveness of physical therapy interventions in improving levels of activity and participation for people with disabilities.

    Writing With the Editors

    Time: 3:30 pm-5:30 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Rebecca Craik, PT, PhD, FAPTA, Daniel L. Riddle, PT, PhD, FAPTA, Chris Maher, PT, PhD, Jan Reynolds

    Level: Intermediate

    You've heard of "Dancing With the Stars"; now it's time for "Writing With the Editors"! PTJ's Editorial Board members know publication inside and out-both as editors and as authors who've had their own share of accepts and rejections. Take advantage of their collective wisdom! During the first half of this session, a Foundation for Physical Therapy PODS I/II recipient will serve as moderator to quiz the editors about everything you need to know, including trial registration, study participant flowcharts, and informed consent. During the second half of the session, you'll break into small groups, each including an editor, with interactions geared for authors who plan to submit a paper to a journal or who have questions broad or specific about writing, submitting, and revising.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Identify when it is appropriate to communicate with editors prior to submission.
    • Explain the importance of trial registration and the implications for the profession.
    • List the elements of a successful Introduction and Discussion.
    • Keep your manuscript within the required page limit while also expressing your thoughts completely.

    Teaching Evidence-based Practice: How Contributing to "Hooked on Evidence" Contributes to Our Curriculum

    Time: 3:30 pm-5:30 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: David Scalzitti, PT, PhD, OCS, Cheryl J. Hill, PT, PhD, Jamie Tomlinson, Greg Karst, PT, PhD, Mary Ann Holbein-Jenny

    Level: Intermediate

    APTA's Hooked on Evidence database allows clinicians to rapidly locate and sort through the constantly growing body of literature related to physical therapy interventions. The database has been built through the grassroots efforts of many contributors, including many physical therapist education programs. In this session presenters from entry-level and postprofessional programs will highlight their experiences teaching evidence-based practice; focusing on how contributing to Hooked on Evidence has been integrated into their curriculum and has enhanced student learning.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Describe the integration of Hooked on Evidence with teaching evidence-based practice.
    • Discuss different strategies for contributing to Hooked on Evidence as part of a curriculum.
    • Contribute an extraction of a research article to Hooked on Evidence.
    • Guide others in the process of entering an article to Hooked on Evidence.

    Saturday, February 11

    PT to PT/PhD: Dismantling the Secrets of the Journey, Part 1

    Time: 8:00 am-10:00 am (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Anita M. Santasier, PT, PhD, OCS, Susan F. Wainwright, PT, PhD

    Level: Multiple Level

    As an increased number of physical therapists choose to pursue a research-based doctoral degree (PhD or EdD), the need to ensure that this experience is fruitful becomes more and more important to both the individual PT and the profession. Thus, this course looks to capture the experience of doctorally prepared PTs, as well as those PTs who were unsuccessful in their quest to earn a research-based doctoral degree (PhD or EdD). It is hoped that the knowledge and behaviors learned, if made explicit, can result in a more efficient, productive, and valued journey. This 3-stage program begins with the observation of a focus group of doctorally prepared PTs (PhD or EdD). Prior to CSM, these focus group participants will have read both the methods and the results sections of a research study titled, "Factors That Facilitate the Transition From PT to PT, PhD," and have been given explicit instruction to reflect upon how their own doctoral experience was similar and different to the results provided. During this course, the focus group will be facilitated by an experienced qualitative researcher who will engage the participants in a discussion about how the findings resonated (or not) with their personal experiences. This focus group serves as a means to confirm the findings of the original data set. In addition to these focus group participants, attendees will observe this focus group discussion as it transpires.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • List relevant factors to consider in the personal selection of a doctoral degree program.
    • Identify potential barriers to the success of this pursuit.
    • Recognize factors that will facilitate an efficient and effective journey.
    • Acknowledge the benefits of focus groups within a public forum as a means of qualitative data collection for research.
    • Engage in networking opportunities with other professionals for professional growth/development.

    PT to PT/PhD: Dismantling the Secrets of the Journey, Part 2

    Time: 10:30 am-12:30 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Anita M. Santasier, PT, PhD, OCS, Susan F. Wainwright, PT, PhD

    Level: Advanced

    As an increased number of physical therapists choose to pursue a research-based doctoral degree (PhD or EdD), the need to ensure that this experience is fruitful becomes more and more important to both the individual PT and the profession. The second stage of this course will be a lecture summarizing the focus group findings, as well as revealing the findings from the original study, "Factors That Facilitate the Transition From PT to PT, PhD." This study reveals the experiences of both successful and unsuccessful PTs in their pursuit of doctoral education. The course will conclude with a Q&A from attendees to a panel of representatives from a variety of doctoral settings. In this way, those who desire guidance during the difficult decision-making process involved in choosing an institution of higher learning and/or navigating the journey will have an opportunity to ask candid questions and make a comparative analysis of the options available. Opportunities for networking will be available.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • List relevant factors to consider in the personal selection of a doctoral degree program.
    • Identify potential barriers to the success of this pursuit.
    • Recognize factors that will facilitate an efficient and effective journey.
    • Acknowledge the benefits of focus groups within a public forum as a means of qualitative data collection for research.
    • Engage in networking opportunities with other professionals for professional growth/development.

    Research Funding Symposium

    Time: 10:30 am-12:30 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: David Scalzitti, PT, PhD, OCS, Mary Rodgers, PT, PhD, FAPTA, Ralph Nitkin, PhD, Daofen Chen, PhD, Lyndon Joseph, PhD,  Patricia A. Dorn, PhD, Amanda Boyce, PhD

    Level: Basic

    This symposium will provide an overview of several of the institutes and centers that compose the National Institutes of Health (NIH), which supports funding for rehabilitation research. The speakers will discuss information on the institutes'/centers' extramural research programs, current research interests and initiatives, and opportunities for training and career development. A panel discussion will include representatives from the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering; the National Center for Medical Rehabilitation Research; the National Institute on Aging; and the National Institute of Arthritis, Musculoskeletal, and Skin Diseases. In addition, a representative with the Veterans Administration, will participate in the panel. After a brief summary from each panel member, there will be the opportunity for open questions and for one-on-one discussions.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Identify research areas supported by these institutes and centers.
    • Recognize current funding initiatives relevant to exercise, physical function, rehabilitation, and technology.
    • Discuss opportunities for research training and career development.

    Eugene Michels Forum 2012

    Time: 3:30 pm-5:30 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Fabrisia Ambrosio, PhD, Heather Ross, PhD

    Level: Multiple Level

    Medical advances are occurring at an unprecedented rate. The development of innovative regenerative medicine technologies holds the promise of offering patients treatment alternatives once never thought possible. As these technologies are increasingly translated to the clinic, so opens up exciting new populations of patients for physical therapists; such populations may present to a variety of physical therapy specialties, including orthopaedics, neurology, cardiopulmonary, geriatrics and pediatrics, for example. Indeed, emerging research reveals that activity-driven chemical and mechanical signaling is critical for maximizing tissue functional capacity. Such findings highlight a critical role for physical therapy in the implementation of these technologies to the clinic. Unfortunately, regenerative medicine scientists frequently default to laboratory methodologies to mimic the effects of mechanical stimulation while all-too-often overlooking the clinically relevant approaches that achieve the same desired outcome. Through this forum, we will utilize musculoskeletal and neurological advancements in regenerative medicine as examples to illustrate a proposed central role that our profession may play in the convergence towards Regenerative Rehabilitation. To close the session, leaders representing both fields will participate in an open discussion about how our profession can be a driver of forward progress, while challenging our historical perceptions about technology and emerging sciences.

    *REPEAT -- Ask a Librarian: Improve Your Searching Skills in 90 Minutes or Less 

    Time: 3:30 pm-5:30 pm (McCormick Place, Room 257)

    Speaker: Gini Blodgett Birchett, MSLS

    Level: Intermediate

    Finding the research you need for the clinical services you provide can be frustrating and time-consuming. In 90 minutes, APTA's information specialist will walk you a variety of resources and searching techniques to help you find the literature you need. Using databases from APTA's Open Door portal, PubMed, and Hooked on Evidence, we will cover selecting the correct resource, incorporating Boolean connectors in your search, crafting a research question into a search query, selecting between keyword or subject searching, and refining search results. Participants should have basic experience with Web or database searching, but even researchers with an extensive searching background will come away with new knowledge and techniques.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Select the appropriate databases and resources for your clinical needs, with a brief look at clinical trials, systematic reviews, clinical scenarios, synthesized summaries, and more.
    • Identify key concepts.
    • Combine terms in a search string free-hand, as well as in a structured P-I-C-O framework.
    • Create search strings using Boolean logic and nesting.
    • Use controlled vocabularies to your advantage.
    • Search, examine results, and revise searches.

     

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