Archive: CSM 2012: Women's Health Programming

  • This is archived programming for CSM 2012. See current programming.

    Browse Women's Health sessions by day. Return to the main topic menu.

    Tuesday, February 7 | Wednesday, February 8 | Thursday, February 9 | Friday, February 10 | Saturday, February 11

    * Should you choose to preselect sessions during the registration process, please be advised that preselection is not a guarantee of a seat. Attendees are asked to preselect to better determine room size and all efforts will be made to accommodate sessions in the largest rooms possible. All attendees are encouraged to show up to sessions early. Attendees are also encouraged to select alternative sessions in the event their first choice is full.

    Tuesday, February 7 (Preconference)

    Bone Camp: Advanced Movement Concepts for Skeletal Health, Part 1

    Time: 8:00 am-5:30 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Sara M. Meeks, PT, MS, GCS

    Level: Multiple Level

    Preconference Pricing: Standard Plus (2 day)

    CEUs: 1.5 (15 contact hours/CCUs)

    People of all ages and physical conditions are flocking to yoga classes. With the majority of people over the age of 50 estimated to have low bone mass, it is imperative that both yoga teachers and physical therapists understand the movement implications, both indicated and contraindicated, for this sometimes very fragile population. This highly experiential workshop focuses on movement "from and for the bones" through the practice of yoga. Movement "from the inside out," with emphasis on alignment, creates an experience of effortless, conscious flow from posture to posture and position to position. The workshop is divided into 3 primary sections: Hip Openers, Core Strengthening, and Safe Active Spinal Rotation. Safety and precautions are emphasized throughout the seminar.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Articulate basic information on osteoporosis and osteopenia, including definitions, pathology, epidemiology, and indicated and contra-indicated movement.
    • Move "from and for the bones" and use anatomical landmarks for the initiation, control, and specificity of exercise and movement.
    • Perform and teach basic yoga postures and yoga-inspired movement that focus on hip flexibility, core strengthening, and active spinal rotation.
    • Instruct patients/clients with osteoporosis in guidelines for safe and contraindicated movement.

    Linked: Breathing and Postural Control-Applying Cardiovascular/Pulmonary Strategies to Women's Health Issues, Part 1

    Time: 8:00 am-5:30 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speaker: Mary P. Massery, PT, DPT

    Level: Multiple Level

    Preconference Pricing: Standard Plus (2 day)

    CEUs: 1.5 (15 contact hours/CCUs)

    This presentation is an expansion of a 2-hour presentation to the Section on Women's Health at CSM in 2008. This 2-day pre-conference course will challenge physical therapists to make a paradigm shift and acknowledge the entire trunk as an integral component of normal postural control and movement strategies from the vocal folds on top, to the diaphragm in the middle, to the pelvic floor on the bottom. Through the use of a "soda pop can" model and novel research, the speaker will demonstrate how every muscle of the trunk has a simultaneous role in postural control and respiration. These muscles finely regulate intra-thoracic and intra-abdominal pressures in order to meet the constantly fluctuating, yet simultaneous demands of postural control, respiration, and internal organ function. This concept provides the cornerstone for the speaker's use of a multi-system approach for evaluating and treating movement dysfunction. The longer pre-conference format will allow for in-depth lab sessions to help the women's health practitioner gain skill in breathing assessment and treatment, and to improve the application of these concepts and skills into daily practice. Multiple clinical examples will be presented from pediatric and adult cases (physical as well as physiologic cases) to demonstrate concepts.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • State how the mechanics of breathing and postural control are interactive and inter-dependent components of normal movement strategies.
    • State how the vocal folds and the pelvic floor are related to each other for breathing, postural control, upper- and lower-extremity function as well as their relationship to their obvious roles in talking and continence.
    • Describe the multiple, simultaneous roles of the diaphragm as related to breathing, postural control, gastroesophageal reflux, constipation, and venous return.
    • Integrate the cardiovascular/pulmonary system into a multi-system physical and physiologic evaluation approach to women's health issues, such as stress incontinence, pain, and balance impairments.
    • Apply theoretical concepts to multiple clinical cases.
    • Demonstrate your ability to visually assess breathing patterns for patients in a variety of postures (standing, sitting, supine, sidelying, etc).
    • Demonstrate your ability to change a breathing pattern through optimal positioning, ventilatory strategies, and manual techniques and state when it would be appropriate for your caseload.

    Wednesday, February 8 (Preconference)

    Bone Camp: Advanced Movement Concepts for Skeletal Health, Part 2

    Time: 8:00 am-5:30 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Sara M. Meeks, PT, MS, GCS

    Level: Multiple Level

    Preconference Pricing: Standard Plus (2 day)

    CEUs: 1.5 (15 contact hours/CCUs)

    People of all ages and physical conditions are flocking to yoga classes. With the majority of people over the age of 50 estimated to have low bone mass, it is imperative that both yoga teachers and physical therapists understand the movement implications, both indicated and contraindicated, for this sometimes very fragile population. This highly experiential workshop focuses on movement "from and for the bones" through the practice of yoga. Movement "from the inside out," with emphasis on alignment, creates an experience of effortless, conscious flow from posture to posture and position to position. The workshop is divided into 3 primary sections: Hip Openers, Core Strengthening, and Safe Active Spinal Rotation. Safety and precautions are emphasized throughout the seminar.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Articulate basic information on osteoporosis and osteopenia, including definitions, pathology, epidemiology, and indicated and contra-indicated movement.
    • Move "from and for the bones" and use anatomical landmarks for the initiation, control, and specificity of exercise and movement.
    • Perform and teach basic yoga postures and yoga-inspired movement that focus on hip flexibility, core strengthening, and active spinal rotation.
    • Instruct patients/clients with osteoporosis in guidelines for safe and contraindicated movement.

    Linked: Breathing and Postural Control-Applying Cardiovascular/Pulmonary Strategies to Women's Health Issues, Part 2

    Time: 8:00 am-5:30 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speaker: Mary P. Massery, PT, DPT

    Level: Multiple Level

    Preconference Pricing: Standard Plus (2 day)

    CEUs: 1.5 (15 contact hours/CCUs)

    This presentation is an expansion of a 2-hour presentation to the Section on Women's Health at CSM in 2008. This 2-day preconference course will challenge physical therapists to make a paradigm shift and acknowledge the entire trunk as an integral component of normal postural control and movement strategies from the vocal folds on top, to the diaphragm in the middle, to the pelvic floor on the bottom. Through the use of a "soda pop can" model and novel research, the speaker will demonstrate how every muscle of the trunk has a simultaneous role in postural control and respiration. These muscles finely regulate intrathoracic and intraabdominal pressures in order to meet the constantly fluctuating, yet simultaneous demands of postural control, respiration, and internal organ function. This concept provides the cornerstone for the speaker's use of a multi-system approach for evaluating and treating movement dysfunction. The longer pre-conference format will allow for in-depth lab sessions to help the women's health practitioner gain skill in breathing assessment and treatment, and to improve the application of these concepts and skills into daily practice. Multiple clinical examples will be presented from pediatric and adult cases (physical as well as physiologic cases) to demonstrate concepts.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • State how the mechanics of breathing and postural control are interactive and inter-dependent components of normal movement strategies.
    • State how the vocal folds and the pelvic floor are related to each other for breathing, postural control, upper- and lower-extremity function as well as their relationship to their obvious roles in talking and continence.
    • Describe the multiple, simultaneous roles of the diaphragm as related to breathing, postural control, gastroesophageal reflux, constipation, and venous return.
    • Integrate the cardiovascular/pulmonary system into a multi-system physical and physiologic evaluation approach to women's health issues, such as stress incontinence, pain, and balance impairments.
    • Apply theoretical concepts to multiple clinical cases.
    • Demonstrate your ability to visually assess breathing patterns for patients in a variety of postures (standing, sitting, supine, sidelying, etc).
    • Demonstrate your ability to change a breathing pattern through optimal positioning, ventilatory strategies, and manual techniques and state when it would be appropriate for your caseload.

    Thursday, February 9

    Colorectal Physical Therapy

    Time: 8:00 am-10:00 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speaker: Marc A. Singer, MD

    Level: Intermediate

    Looking at current trends and treatment in the field of colorectal disorders and surgery.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Identify current treatments used for colorectal disorders.
    • Understand the benefits that pelvic floor physical therapy can help to assist with colorectal disorders.

    Isolation Versus Integration: Dynamic Pelvic Floor for Core Programs, Part 1

    Time: 8:00 am-10:00 am (See Program for Room)

    Speaker: Julie W. Wiebe, PT, MPT

    Level: Intermediate

    Despite its inclusion in most definitions of the core, few rehabilitation or fitness programs integrate the pelvic floor into strengthening or neuromotor training. Instead, the pelvic floor remains an isolated entity, strengthened with disconnected activities. An integrated clinical model of the pelvic floor in core programs requires a broadened definition of pelvic floor function beyond merely maintaining continence. The pelvic floor is a primary stabilizer of the lumbosacral, sacroiliac, pubic symphysis, and pelvic-hip joints, ensuring efficient lower and upper extremity mechanics. Current evidence supports a model that trains a synergistic coordination of all components of the lumbopelvic musculature. This first installment of a 2-part session will introduce clinicians to the evidence for an integrated clinical model that incorporates a neuromuscular-based core recruitment, driven by external cueing of both the pelvic floor and diaphragm in precise alignment. Evidence of dysfunction in this system can manifest across a woman's lifespan: at puberty, possibly contributing to non-contact ACL injuries in adolescent girls; during pregnancy and beyond, as a plethora of musculoskeletal complaints; and, finally, as balance and incontinence dysfunction in older women.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Identify the critical role of the pelvic floor in the anticipatory core team and in maintaining lumbosacral, sacroiliac, pubic symphysis, and pelvic hip joints to ensure lower and upper extremity mechanics.
    • Explain differences between traditional musculoskeletal core exercise driven by the abdominals and anticipatory neuromuscular core strategies driven by the diaphragm and pelvic floor.
    • Identify neutral pelvis and rib cage alignment that is essential to maintaining the relationship between the diaphragm and the pelvic floor.
    • Discuss the contribution of anticipatory core dysfunction on subsequent musculoskeletal dysfunction across the lifespan.
    • Examine the possible ethical, cultural, and gender concerns regarding explaining a technique to patients that involves the pelvic floor.

    What Does a Women's Health Therapist REALLY Do?

    Time: 10:30 am-12:30 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Marcy Crouch, PT, DPT, CLT, Darla Cathcart, PT, DPT, WCS, CLT, Valerie Bobb, PT, MPT, ATC, Nicole Coleman, PT, DPT, Jessica Strobel, Stephanie Bush, Susannah Haarman

    Level: Basic

    This course is for physical therapists and physical therapy students who are interested in learning more about women's health physical therapy. Participants will meet the leaders of the Section on Women's Health along with the Student Special-Interest Group and learn about the different aspects of this physical therapy specialty practice. The speakers will introduce participants to pelvic pain, incontinence, lymphedema, the female athlete, and pregnancy-related care. There will also be an overview of the ways to achieve women's health certifications, such as courses offered through the Section on Women's Health, residencies, mentoring opportunities, and more. This course will end with a question-and-answer session.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Describe the various women's health practice settings in which physical therapists practice.
    • Identify the challenges and expanding opportunities available for those interested in women's health.
    • Utilize resources and networking opportunities available to learn more about clinical affiliations and events happening in your geographic region.
    • Discuss the role of the women's health clinical residency within the advanced practice of physical therapy.

    Isolation Versus Integration: Dynamic Pelvic Floor for Core Programs, Part 2

    Time: 10:30 am-12:30 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speaker: Julie W. Wiebe, PT, MPT

    Level: Intermediate

    Despite its inclusion in most definitions of the core, few rehabilitation or fitness programs integrate the pelvic floor into strengthening or neuromotor training. Instead, the pelvic floor remains an isolated entity, strengthened with disconnected activities. However, our evolving understanding of optimized muscle performance demonstrates that muscle groups do not work in isolation, but are prepared for return to function, fitness, or sport performance through integrated muscle patterning activities. Part 1 of this 2-part session introduced clinicians to the evidence for an integrated clinical model for core recruitment driven by external cueing of both the pelvic floor and diaphragm in precise alignment. Part 2 will demonstrate an assessment model of the postural alignment that enhances the relationship between the diaphragm and pelvic floor. Participants will then have the opportunity to experience the material themselves through exercises that integrate a dynamic pelvic floor into core and postural muscle patterning activities. A case study will be presented to demonstrate clinical application and treatment progression in a complicated patient.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Identify the critical role of the pelvic floor in the anticipatory core team and in maintaining lumbosacral, sacroiliac, pubic symphysis, and pelvic hip joints to ensure lower and upper extremity mechanics.
    • Identify neutral pelvis and rib cage alignment that is essential to maintaining the relationship between the diaphragm and the pelvic floor.
    • Experience exercise that reconnects the fully integrated anticipatory core with synergistic postural muscle groups to promote pain-free functional movement patterns, empowered gait, aligned posture, and return to fitness and sport activities.
    • Synthesize material with clinical application through the presentation of a complicated patient case study.
    • Examine the possible ethical, cultural, and gender concerns regarding explaining a technique to patients that involves the pelvic floor.

    Pelvic Pain Considerations for the Male and Female Athlete

    Time: 3:30 pm-5:30 pm (See Program for Room)

    (Joint Program: Sports Physical Therapy)

    Speakers: Karen H. Liberi, PT, MPT, MS, WCS, Victor Liberi, MS, CSCS, ATC

    Level: Basic

    There is a need among athletic health care providers and women's/men's health care providers for increased awareness of pelvic floor dysfunction (PFD) in male and female athletes. PFD can occur due to either acute traumatic pathology or subtle mechanical changes over time. Educating the clinician on these conditions is a critical component for intervening with proper treatment. There has been little research on PFD in the athlete in terms of incontinence, but even less research on pelvic pain in this specific population. This presentation will help the audience better understand the anatomy contributing to pain as well as the urologic/urogynecologic presentation of the athlete. It will be critical for the athlete to functionally regain control of the dysfunctional components contributing to pain, not only for the present time, but to hopefully prevent pelvic pain in the future.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Identify anatomical structures that may be contributing to pelvic pain.
    • Explain the anatomical structures' significance in athletes.
    • Describe the relationship of pain location and possible etiology.
    • Screen for conditions that may need further intervention.
    • Discuss treatment considerations for the athlete with pelvic pain.

    Physical Therapy for the Transgender Woman With Pelvic Pain After Vaginoplasty

    Time: 3:30 pm-5:30 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speaker: Pamela Morrison, PT, DPT, MS, BCA-PMD

    Level: Multiple Level

    Orthopedic and women's health physical therapists treating pelvic pain and sexual pain disorders will benefit from learning about the transgender woman population and have a greater understanding of their medical histories. The material will cover the history of male-to-female sex reassignment, transgender terminologies, vaginoplasty surgery, sexual practices in the transsexual woman, and physical therapy for pelvic pain after vaginoplasty. A case study will be reviewed.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Explain transgender terminologies.
    • Describe the medical processes and procedures of the transgender woman patient.
    • Ask the necessary questions during the history intake of the physical therapy evaluation.
    • Perform physical therapy evaluation and treatment approaches that may be effective in this patient population.
    • Discuss the special considerations in treating this population.

    Friday, February 10

    Women's Health Professional Program Content Guideline Update

    Time: 8:00 am-10:00 am (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Patricia R. Nelson, PT, ScD, OCS, FAAOMPT, Carol Figuers, PT, EdD, Mary Dockter, PT, PhD, Ann Dunbar, Jill S. Boissonnault, PT, PhD, WCS, Kathleen Anderson, PT, PhD, MBA, OCS, FAAOMPT, Andrea Branas, MSE MPT, CLT, Kathleen A. Alcon, PT, MS, CLT

    Level: Multiple Level

    This session provides an overview of the process of updating the suggested content provided to students in their professional program. It includes a review of the survey instruments, giving eligible participants the opportunity to complete them. The format session is an interactive discussion on the skill set needed for the different levels of women's health providers: entry level, experienced, and expert. While some of this information will be collected from the survey, an interactive discussion may provide additional considerations to the content recommendations.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Identify the process of data collection used to inform the task force for updating the professional program content recommendations.
    • Describe the expected skill set of an entry-level practitioner.
    • Participate in ongoing discussions related to women's health specialization and necessary skill sets.

    Advanced Analysis of Bladder Diaries

    Time: 8:00 am-10:00 am (See Program for Room)

    Speaker: Beth Shelly, PT, DPT, WCS, BCB, PMD

    Level: Advanced

    Understanding bladder diary results is essential to creating effective treatment plans for patients with pelvic floor dysfunction. This session provides advanced you with objective methods of evaluating bladder function in your patients. Most pelvic PTs have some knowledge of bladder diary evaluation; however, more precise calculations can increase success and patient outcomes. Clinicians can use mathematical calculations of measured-volume diaries to determine global polyuria, nocturnal polyuria, small-volume bladder, and other conditions. Participants should bring a completed patient bladder diary to this session for use and application of the information. 

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Determine global and nocturnal polyuria.
    • List possible reasons for polyuria.
    • Fully assess a measured-volume bladder diary.
    • Determine when patients need further medical intervention based on bladder dairy results.

    The Prenatal Patient

    Time: 10:30 am-12:30 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speaker: Deborah B. Riczo, PT, DPT, MEd

    Level: Basic

    Physical therapists who do not consider themselves "women's health" therapists still need to be able to treat pregnant women for a variety of complaints. This session gives you the knowledge base to perform effective screenings and examinations, and therefore feel more comfortable with working with the patient who is pregnant. Examination and treatment considerations will be discussed.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Describe the anatomical and physiological changes that occur in each system during pregnancy.
    • Describe common medical conditions and symptoms/discomforts of pregnancy and determine when to refer to a physician.
    • Explain the exercise guidelines that are appropriate during pregnancy.
    • Discuss tests and measures considerations often used in assessing the prenatal woman.
    • Apply appropriate interventions and discuss educational topics commonly used to treat the prenatal woman.

    Treating Chronic Pelvic Pain From a Functional Medicine Perspective

    Time: 10:30 am-12:30 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speaker: Nikol Margiotta, DN, ABAAHP, FAARFM

    Level: Intermediate

    This session discusses how and why disease processes start and how to prevent, reverse, or stop them. Using her expertise in functional medicine, the presenterwill identify and explain the root of a disease or imbalance and give you the information you need to design specific guidelines and action plans to restore more vibrant health.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Define functional medicine.
    • Describe variations in metabolic functions among individuals.
    • Describe how immunological dysfunctions can impact other body systems.
    • Identify dietary imbalances that can cause hormonal disturbances.

    Everything You Need to Know About Women's Health Residency

    Time: 3:30 pm-5:30 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Natalie Sebba, PT, DPT, Marcy Crouch, PT, DPT, CLT

    Level: Basic

    Join the presenters as they introduce all aspects of women's health residency. The session begins with an update on all the residency programs currently available, the application process, and the highlights of each program. Next, a panel comprising the current women's health residents and an alumna provides an up-close and personal account of the daily expectations and benefits of being a women's health resident. There will be ample time for questions to ensure that you leave with detailed information about how a women's health residency can advance your career.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • List the women's health residencies that currently are accepting applicants.
    • Recognize the difference between a women's health residency that is accredited, one that is in the accreditation process, and one that is in development.
    • Describe what a resident of each available program does on a daily basis and the overall program requirements.
    • Discuss how completion of a residency can benefit career development in women's heath physical therapy.
    • List the application requirements for each available women's health residency.
    • Describe the application process for each available women's health residency.

    The Neuromatrix: A New and Emerging Pain Science Paradigm

    Time: 3:30 pm-5:30 pm (See Program for Room)

    (Joint Program: Orthopaedics)

    Speaker: Robert Johnson, PT, MS, OCS

    Level: Multiple Level

    This session provides an update to the neuromatrix model and integrates current pain science neurobiology into existing manual therapy/exercise models of intervention for chronic lumbo-pelvic/LE pain patients. Modern pain science dictates that careful evaluation of the chronic pelvic pain patient must include peripheral tissue-focused, peripheral sensitivity-driven, and central sensitivity-driven factors. The sensitization of neural networks associated with the painful body part increases with, and can drive, a chronic pain state. In addition to increased sensitivity, a variety of difficult-to-explain changes may occur including bilateral pain, unpredictable responses to tissue-targeted and pharmacological treatments, anxiety, depression, and other sensory abnormalities such as reduced sensory discrimination around the pelvis. The neuromatrix model embraces these systemic representations of chronic pain and provides a framework for clinicians to use deep clinical reasoning to provide for broader evaluative interpretation and intervention choices.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Expand the clinical framework of rehabilitation using the biopsychosocial paradigms of the neuromatrix and pain mechanisms models.
    • Describe the neurobiology underlying maladaptive central sensitivity and its relationship to chronic pelvic pain expression.
    • Discuss clinically relevant application of critical thinking in the evaluation and intervention of a variety of orthopedic pain complaints.
    • Describe clinically relevant case vignettes and highlight common and novel clinical reasoning strategies for examination and intervention of patients with lumbo-pelvic/LE pain.

    Saturday, February 11

    Medical Considerations of the Pelvic Floor, Part 1: Diagnosis and Treatment Options

    Time: 8:00 am-10:00 am (See Program for Room)

    Speaker: Heather L. Moky, PT

    Level: Intermediate

    This course will include a panel discussion from medical experts in the Chicago area who specialize in pelvic health diagnosis, medical intervention, and treatment. Recognized experts will include doctors and surgeons from the Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago, the University of Chicago, and other leaders in the Chicago medical community.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Reflect upon the examination and intervention in pelvic floor dysfunction cases from a medical perspective.
    • Identify current medical treatment options for pelvic diagnoses, including pain, prolapse, and dysfunction.
    • Identify recent evidence in this field regarding diagnosis, medical intervention, and treatment options.

    Medical Considerations of the Pelvic Floor, Part 2: Panel Discussion

    Time: 10:30 am-12:30 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speaker: Heather L. Moky, PT

    Level: Multiple Level

    A panel of experts with different backgrounds in pelvic floor care will present on various topics of pelvic floor dysfunction. The experts will discuss pelvic pain, bowel dysfunction, and urinary dysfunction. Attendees can bring questions or case studies for the experts to provide information on examination and intervention.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Reflect upon the examination, intervention, and evidence of basic and complicated pelvic floor dysfunction cases, including comorbidities.

    Vulvar Disease: What Not to Miss

    Time: 3:30 pm-5:30 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speaker: Bethanee Schlosser, MD

    Level: Intermediate

    This session will provide a systematic approach to the vulvar examination emphasizing normal and abnormal vulvar anatomy.  Content will also focus on clinical clues to the identification and diagnosis of important vulvar diseases, both common and uncommon, that have significant implications and may require aggressive intervention using systemic medications and/or surgical excision.  The need for long-term monitoring of patients with vulvar diseases and the importance of patient education in the management of vulvar disease will be emphasized. 

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Develop an approach to the vulvar examination with emphasis on normal and abnormal findings.
    • Identify key clinical features of common vulvar diseases 
    • Discuss the need for long-term monitoring of vulvar disease patients and clinical features which may prompt additional diagnostic evaluation or change in treatment approach.   

    Advanced Pregnancy Considerations: A Panel Discussion

    Time: 3:30 pm-5:30 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speaker: Heather L. Moky, PT

    Level: Multiple Level

    This course will present the attendee with a panel of experts in obstetrics and gynecolgy. The experts will be able to discuss controversial topics in pregnancy and delivery. Attendees may bring questions to submit to the panel.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Reflect upon debatable pregnancy and delivery issues.

    Preparing for the Women's Health Specialization Exam (WCS): Tools for Support and Success

    Time: 3:30 pm-5:30 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Elizabeth Hampton, PT, WCS, BCB-PMD, Stacy L. Tylka, PT, WCS, Wendy Baltzer-Fox, PT, DPT, GCS, WCS, Eliza Andrews, PT, WCS, Tina Mansour, PT, DPT, WCS, CLT

    Level: Intermediate

    This course will provide the attendee with helpful suggestions to prepare for the Women's Health Specialization Exam to become a women's health clinical specialist (WCS). The speakers will discuss information regarding eligibility requirements, submission of the application and the case reflection, and the roles and responsibilities of a WCS in the clinic.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Recognize the steps needed to complete the Women's Health Specialization Exam application and case reflection.
    • Use suggestions from the panel to determine the most appropriate means of preparing for the examination.
    • Establish an action plan for the application, the case reflection, and studying.
    • Outline the ABPTS certification process, including the minimum eligibility requirements and application process.
    • Review the process of examination evaluation and obtaining results.
    • Describe the role and responsibilities of the newly certified women's health clinical specialist.
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