Archive: CSM 2013: Education Programming

  • This is archived programming for CSM 2013. See current programming.

    Browse Education sessions by day. Return to the main topic menu 

    Sunday, January 20 | Monday, January 21 | Tuesday, January 22 | Wednesday, January 23 | Thursday, January 24 

    * Should you choose to preselect regular (not preconference) Tuesday-Thursday sessions during the registration process, please be advised that preselection is not a guarantee of a seat. Attendees are asked to preselect to better determine room size and all efforts will be made to accommodate sessions in the largest rooms possible. All attendees are encouraged to show up to sessions early. Attendees are also encouraged to select alternative sessions in the event their first choice is full. 

    Sunday, January 20 (Preconference)

    Systematic Program Assessment: A Dialogue and Workshop for PTA Educators, Part 1

    Location: Hilton Bayfront | Sapphire 402

    Time: 8:00 am–4:30 pm

    Speakers: Becky S. McKnight, PT, MS

    Level: Intermediate

    CEUs: 1.5 (1.5 contact hours/CCUs)

    Preconference Pricing: Standard (2A) 2 Day

    This workshop is designed for PTA educators from established programs. The workshop will open with a review of foundational principles and current literature of program assessment. After this introductory discussion, small and large-group activities will allow attendees to self-evaluate their program assessment plans as well as receive peer feedback. Group activities also will include creating assessment tools for various aspects of the assessment process. Specific tools and topic areas will be determined based upon attendees' identified area of need. Attendees will need to bring their own laptop and program assessment materials, including a copy of their assessment plans and examples of assessment tools used.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Describe critical elements of a program assessment plan.
    • Describe methods to structure assessment processes to increase efficiency, efficacy, and effectiveness.
    • Evaluate one's own PTA program assessment plan in light of critical elements.
    • Select methods to improve one's own PTA program assessment plan.
    • Create assessment tools required to adequately evaluate specific components of the PTA program.
    • Clearly communicate, in written form, a comprehensive program assessment plan to bodies of interest (eg, state agencies, administration, CAPTE).

    Monday, January 21 (Preconference)

    iTeach, iLearn, iPad

    Location: Hilton Bayfront | Sapphire 400

    Time: 8:00 am - 5:00 pm

    Speakers: Kendra Gagnon, PT, PhD; Carla Sabus, PT, PhD; Angela M. Heaton, PT, MSEd; Cindy Brandehoff, PTA; Andrea Liles, PT; Diana Rammel, PTA

    Level: Multiple level

    CEUs: 0.8 (8.0 contact hours/CCUs)

    Preconference Pricing: Standard Plus (1B)

    This interactive workshop will showcase the iPad and demonstrate how the device may be used by faculty and students in DPT and PTA education. The speakers will present comprehensive strategies for optimizing the use of technology to support an interactive and engaging classroom. Two models of iPad deployment and implementation will be described: a student-centered pilot, with iPads provided to each student in a PTA program; and a faculty-centered project, with an iPad provided to each faculty member in a DPT program. The speakers will present exemplars of faculty and student iPad use and will include discussion of student and faculty feedback, triumphs, and challenges associated with adopting iPads in higher education. Through a combination of presentation, discussion, and hands-on learning, the attendee will discover iPad applications and accessories that will ultimately enhance the educator's ability to "iTeach" and the student's ability to "iLearn." Attendees are encouraged—but not required—to "BYOD" (bring their own devices) to access technology, participate in demonstrations, and use social media to discuss this workshop in real time.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Describe specific strategies for using the iPad to improve work flow, productivity, and outcomes in education, research, and practice.
    • Discuss benefits and challenges associated with various models of departmental and/or institutional iPad adoption, including one-to-one and bring-your-own-device programs.
    • Develop kinesthetic applications with the iPad using the camera, video, and annotated screen.
    • Discuss free "app" technology to enhance learning experiences.
    • Develop classroom rules and department policies that reflect ethical and legal use of iPad technology in education and health care.
    • Describe effective strategies of using iPad technology within the classroom, lab, and clinical environment to enhance learning experiences.
    • Brainstorm with other course attendees and share experiences, including opportunities and challenges, with using the iPad in clinical and academic settings.
    • Use iPad applications in a simulated teaching or learning scenario.

    Systematic Program Assessment: A Dialogue and Workshop for PTA Educators, Part 2

    Location: Hilton Bayfront | Sapphire 402

    Time: 8:00 am–4:30 pm

    Speakers: Becky S. McKnight, PT, MS

    Level: Intermediate

    CEUs: 1.5 (1.5 contact hours/CCUs)

    Preconference Pricing: Standard (2A) 2 Day

    This workshop is designed for PTA educators from established programs. The workshop will open with a review of foundational principles and current literature of program assessment. After this introductory discussion, small and large-group activities will allow attendees to self-evaluate their program assessment plans as well as receive peer feedback. Group activities also will include creating assessment tools for various aspects of the assessment process. Specific tools and topic areas will be determined based upon attendees' identified area of need. Attendees will need to bring their own laptop and program assessment materials, including a copy of their assessment plans and examples of assessment tools used.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Describe critical elements of a program assessment plan.
    • Describe methods to structure assessment processes to increase efficiency, efficacy, and effectiveness.
    • Evaluate one's own PTA program assessment plan in light of critical elements.
    • Select methods to improve one's own PTA program assessment plan.
    • Create assessment tools required to adequately evaluate specific components of the PTA program.
    • Clearly communicate, in written form, a comprehensive program assessment plan to bodies of interest (eg, state agencies, administration, CAPTE).

    Strategies for Successful Residency and Fellowship Mentoring

    Location: San Diego Convention Center | 5A

    Time: 8:00 am - 5:30 pm

    Level: Intermediate

    This is a joint program. See full description at Geriatrics programming.

    Tuesday, January 22

    Grassroots Initiatives in Clinical Education to Discover Collaborative Strategies

    Time: 8:00 am–10:00 am (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Christine McCallum, PT; Peter Mosher, PT, DPT, OCS; Janice Howman, PT, DPT, MEd; Amelia Siles, PT, DPT, NCS

    Level: Intermediate

    Clinical education (CE) faces many challenges: New academic programs, expanding enrollments in current programs, and lengthening of CE experiences have led to a 71% growth in demand, while the pool of available clinical instructors has grown by just 43%. Regulation and reimbursement constraints, in addition to the supply and demand issue, make essential the need for collaboration by all stakeholders. This session will provide a model for regional mobilization of a CE community, including background data, initiatives developed and implemented through the Ohio-Kentucky Consortium of PT Programs for Clinical Education (OKCPT), and outcomes achieved. The speakers will present strategies the consortium used to assess CE demand and enhance resource utilization, and how collaboration has led to regional workshops, multi-institutional research studies, and strategic planning for continued development of OKCPT's CE network. A panel of stakeholders will encourage attendees to develop strategies for examining regional CE trends and to understand resource availability and utilization.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Discuss the current state of CE, including related strains and administrative burdens facing academic faculty, clinical mentors, and clinic managers.
    • Examine the various perspectives of all stakeholders in a CE community.
    • Describe the mobilization of one regional CE consortium involving both academic and clinical partners to prepare for the future of entry-level PT education.
    • Generate strategies for developing and enhancing regional interaction among academic, clinical, and administrative partners to assess, design, and implement collaborative CE initiatives.

    The Interprofessional Ethics Curriculum: Challenges and Resources

    Time: 8:00 am–10:00 am (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Laura L. Swisher, PT, PhD, MDiv

    Level: Multiple Level

    Within the last 2 years, the Interprofessional Education Collaborative (IPEC) expert panel has published its report delineating core competencies for interprofessional collaboration, and the Interprofessional Professionalism Collaborative (IPC) has published a document explaining behaviors indicative of interprofessional professionalism. Driven by new accreditation standards requiring interprofessional competence, professional education programs are developing new interprofessional initiatives. Values/ethics is 1 of the 4 domains of interprofessional competence identified by IPEC, and ethics is often cited as one potential topic for interprofessional education. While most professions utilize shared ethical concepts, there is no universal moral language or approach to ethics across health care professions. In contrast to medical ethics, physical therapists and other rehabilitation professionals may utilize ethical perspectives based on the disablement model and their unique role on the interprofessional team. Development of interprofessional ethics raises foundational questions about interprofessional and rehabilitation ethics, as well as the role of physical therapists and other rehabilitation professionals in interprofessional education. The purpose of this presentation is to discuss challenges and resources for interprofessional ethics education. The speaker will her discuss experiences developing interprofessional ethics education at the University of South Florida School of Physical Therapy & Rehabilitation Sciences and will conclude with discussion of attendees experience with interprofessional education.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Compare the interprofessional competencies within the IPEC domain of values/ethics to the IPC interprofessional professionalism behaviors.
    • Discuss the unique theoretical and practical challenges for designing interprofessional education involving physical therapists and other rehabilitation professionals.
    • Identify resources for interprofessional ethics education
    • Describe different approaches to interprofessional ethics education.

    Interprofessional Simulations to Teach Emergency Management

    Time: 8:00 am–10:00 am (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Alison T. DeLeo, PT, DPT, NREMT-B; Elizabeth A. Ruckert, PT, DPT, NCS; Margaret M. Plack, PT, EdD; Joshua D'Angelo;

    Level: Multiple Level

    Physical therapists play an increasingly vital role in the identification and management of medical emergencies during day-to-day clinical patient care. As direct access practitioners, physical therapists must be prepared to recognize and respond to changes in patient presentation in order to maximize patient safety and outcomes in emergent situations. Aside from basic life-support courses, emergency response is minimally included in the didactic component of physical therapy education. As a result, many students are underprepared and lack confidence when responding to similar situations in the clinic. Simulated patient scenarios are well-established successful teaching and learning tools in clinician education. Feedback and debriefing of simulated patient scenarios have also been widely used to identify and ameliorate curricular gaps. This workshop will examine the roles and responsibilities of the physical therapist during emergencies in various settings. The speakers will identify common strategies and barriers associated with effective and efficient communication and management of patient emergencies and discuss preclinical activities that support the development of competency in the knowledge, skills, and attitudes of DPT students through interprofessional case studies and didactic instruction.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Identify the roles and responsibilities of the physical therapist during emergencies in various settings.
    • Recognize challenges students face in learning to effectively and efficiently manage patient emergencies.
    • Apply effective strategies to teach DPT students how to manage patient emergencies, including interprofessional simulations with emergency medical technician students.
    • Implement pre-clinical activities to support the development of competence in the knowledge, skills, and attitudes needed in managing medical emergencies.

    Using Clinical Narratives for Professional Development and Critical Reflection, Part 1

    Time: 8:00 am–10:00 am (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Bruce Greenfield, PT, PhD, MMSc, MA (Bioethics), OCS; Gail Jensen, PT, PhD; Mary Knab, PT, DPT; Ann Jampel, PT, MS

    Level: Basic

    The use of narrative strategies for case construction or reflection on practice can be a powerful learning tool across the professional development continuum for practitioners. Narrative strategies for learning are currently being used in a number of physical therapist educational programs to help students reflect on and maximize learning from their clinical experiences. Practitioner construction of personal narratives is also being integrated into clinical practice to foster and evaluate professional development and promotion and in residency programs. The narrative case or reflection captures one’s experience with a case, patient, or clinical situation in its fullest meaning. When the narrative is retold and reflected upon, one engages in a metacognitive process of learning from experience. We learn more deeply from thinking, writing, and talking about our experience. Numerous studies have shown that one of the most important distinctions between experts and non-experts is the expert’s use of higher-order processes or metacognition and critical reflection. This session will introduce attendees to the methodology of the clinical narrative and theoretical foundation for reflection and narrative ways of knowing, and discuss the application of clinical narrative methods to physical therapist practice, education, and research.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Analyze the basic concepts, theory, and research underlying the use of narrative tools and inquiry in physical therapy.
    • Use narrative tools to facilitate the development of metacognitive skills across the continuum of professional development.

    Intellectual Property 101: Strategies to Enhance Patent, Trademark, and Copyright Protection in the World of Physical Therapy

    Time: 11:00 am–1:00 pm (See Program for Room)

    Level: Intermediate

    This is a joint program. See full description at Health Policy and Administration programming.

    Promoting the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning in Physical Therapy

    Joint Program: Research

    Time: 11:00 am–1:00 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Margaret M. Plack, PT, EdD; Maryanne Driscoll, PhD; Jennifer Halvaksv

    Level: Intermediate

    Whether in the classroom or the clinic, teaching is an integral part of the work we do every day in physical therapy. We teach patients, students, fellow professionals, and community members. We strive to incorporate and generate evidence for practice, which includes teaching. But where do busy professionals find time to pursue scholarly projects? The secret is working smarter not harder! They make their work count twice by translating their teaching efforts into scholarship. This workshop is designed for anyone who wants to learn how to take what he or she does every day in the classroom or clinic and make it count twice. You'll learn concrete steps for turning your everyday teaching into scholarship that adds to the evidence base of physical therapy. In this workshop, attendees will work collaboratively to identify ways to incorporate the scholarship of teaching and learning (SOTL) into your own practice. Through a series of facilitated exercises, rapid-cycle brainstorming, and peer feedback sessions, clinicians will develop a practical, low-cost scholarship of teaching and learning project (including a SOTL question, identification of sources of evidence, and a plan for data collection and analysis) to implement in their home institutions after the conference.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Identify a topic to explore through SOTL in your current work as an educator in the classroom or clinic.
    • Develop a data collection and analysis plan to address/answer your purpose/question.
    • Critique and provide feedback to colleagues on their scholarship of teaching and learning project.
    • Apply the lessons learned to future professional development through the development of individual action plans.

    Redirecting Inappropriate Patient Sexual Behavior, Part 1

    Joint Program: Neurology

    Time: 11:00 am–1:00 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Ziadee W. Cambier, PT, DPT

    Level: Basic

    Inappropriate patient sexual behavior (IPSB) is any verbal or physical act of an explicit or perceived sexual nature that is unacceptable within the social context in which it is carried out. IPSB encompasses a spectrum of patient behaviors, ranging from staring and suggestive remarks to genital exposure, forceful groping, and rape. IPSB is pervasive in clinical practice, experienced by as many as 85% of physical therapists during their career, and has significant negative consequences for both clinicians and patients. In Part 1 of this 2-part series, the speaker will establish the problem, explore reasons for it, and use case studies and small-group discussion to develop ethical decision-making skills and address termination of care. This session is appropriate for both individuals who wish to improve their responses to IPSB and educators interested in learning interactive teaching methods on this topic.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Identify inappropriate patient sexual behavior (IPSB) and be aware of its prevalence.
    • Articulate your legal and ethical obligations to the patient as well as your legal rights to a safe workplace and be able apply these to IPSB scenarios.
    • Understand reasons behind IPSB and demonstrate empathy for patients with poor behavior.
    • Recognize and reflect on your personal reactions to IPSB, evaluate IPSB situations, and select professional responses.

    Turning the Traditional Classroom Into a 21st Century Knowledge Exchange

    Time: 11:00 am–1:00 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Timothy W. Flynn, PT, PhD, OCS, FAAOMPT; Robert S. Wainner, PT, PhD, OCS, FAAOMPT

    Level: Advanced

    Let's face it—Technology is changing the face of education from preschool through graduate school! Physical therapy education is no exception. Despite a body of evidence suggesting that the traditional lecture style instruction is lacking, it remains the predominant mode of information exchange. In the last decade there has been a move towards the flipped classroom where students watch lectures at home at their pace and communicate with peers and faculty with online discussions. Face-to-face time with the faculty focuses on engaging problem solving and laboratory experiences. This presentation will discuss how current best evidence lectures are produced and shared as homework assignments outside of class while sacred classroom time is reserved for collaborative work and hands-on learning activities. We will describe mechanisms to ensure learning is occurring and preliminary outcomes using this methodology.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Define blended learning.
    • Identify and discuss the 6 primary blended learning models.
    • Describe characteristics of successful online learners and teachers.
    • Describe the flipped classroom model.
    • Identify key technical components required to successfully implement the flipped classroom model in DPT education.
    • Examine the benefits, risks, and challenges of this model.

    Using Clinical Narratives for Professional Development and Critical Reflection, Part 2

    Time: 11:00 am–1:00 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Bruce Greenfield, PT, PhD, MMSc, MA (Bioethics), OCS; Gail Jensen, PT, PhD; Mary Knab, PT, DPT; Ann Jampel, PT, MS

    Level: Basic

    The use of narrative strategies for case construction or reflection on practice can be a powerful learning tool across the professional development continuum for practitioners. Narrative strategies for learning are currently being used in a number of physical therapist education programs to help students reflect on and maximize learning from their clinical experiences. Practitioner construction of personal narratives is also being integrated into clinical practice to foster and evaluate professional development and promotion and in residency programs. The narrative case or reflection captures one's experience with a case, patient, or a clinical situation in its fullest meaning. When the narrative is retold and reflected upon, one engages in a meta-cognitive process of learning from experience. We learn more deeply from thinking, writing, and talking about our experience. Numerous studies have shown that one of the most important distinctions between experts and non-experts is the expert's use of higher-order processes or metacognition and critical reflection. In this session the speakers will focus on writing and interpreting clinical narratives. Attendees will practice writing clinical narratives based on personal experiences and apply strategies for exploring and interpreting clinical narratives.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Apply specific tools and strategies for writing clinical narratives.
    • Use practice and feedback to write and interpret narratives.

    Global Opportunities in Physical Therapy Education

    Joint Program: Health Policy and Administration

    Time: 3:00 pm–5:00 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Cathy Peterson, PT, EdD; Yvette Blanchard, PT, ScD; Julia Chevan, PT, PhD, MPH, OCS; Juan C. Garbalosa, PT, PhD; Meredith Hinds Harris, PT, DPT, EdD; Thomas G. McPoil, PT, PhD, FAPTA; Lana R. Svien, PT, PhD, MA

    Level: Basic

    It has been projected that the demand for global education at the tertiary level will increase from 1.8 million students in 2000 to 7.2 million in 2025; however, this facet of globalization only addresses student enrollments across borders. Very little is known about faculty engagement with global education. The American Council on Education has concluded that internationalization is not sufficiently deep nor as widespread as it should be to prepare students for the challenges they will face once they graduate. The presenters will share their experiences as faculty who have participated in global education through opportunities made available by the Council for International Exchange of Scholars. These Fulbright Scholars and Fulbright Specialists will discuss the respective programs, their application processes, their preparation for global engagement, outcomes, and lessons learned. A panel discussion will follow to address audience questions.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Differentiate between the Fulbright Scholar Program and the Fulbright Specialist Program.
    • Describe the attributes of successful applications for service as a Fulbright Scholar or Fulbright Specialist.
    • Discuss opportunities and challenges associated with teaching, conducting research, and providing content expertise for program development in a foreign country, be it developed or developing.
    • Propose potential benefits to your personal and professional growth as well as to your program and institution as a result of hosting a non-US Scholar or serving as a Fulbright Scholar or Fulbright Specialist.

    Linda Crane Lectureship—From Silos to Bridges: Preparing Effective Teams for a Better Delivery System

    Time: 3:00 pm–5:00 pm (See Program for Room)

    Level: Multiple Level

    This is a joint program. See full description at Cardiovascular and Pulmonary programming.

    Managing the At-Risk Student: When Sailing Isn't Smooth

    Time: 3:00 pm–5:00 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Denise A. Wise, PT, PhD; James Carey, PT, PhD; Mary Dockter, PT, PhD; Elizabeth Domholdt, PT, PhD, FAPTA; Mark Wolf, PT, JD

    Level: Basic

    Entry-level physical therapy education is a rigorous process that addresses all domains of learning: cognitive, affective, and psychomotor. The overarching goal of entry-level physical therapy education is the preparation of qualified, competent providers who meet rigorous academic, psychomotor, and behavioral criteria required of the profession. Academic and clinical faculty play an important role in the comprehensive evaluation of student performance in all domains. An unfortunate aspect of education is that not all students are able to successfully complete their education because of their inability to meet academic and/or behavioral criteria. In this session, the speakers will discuss risk management concepts that help assure and protect the rights of students, and protect the profession from future practitioners who do not possess adequate skills or values required for competent practice, while at the same time minimizing risks to the institution. Risk management concepts that will be addressed include programmatic, institutional, and legal considerations affecting early identification of at-risk students with academic and/or behavioral concerns, parameters regarding probationary status, the process of student dismissal with associated appeals processes, and legal action that may ensue.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Determine congruency between written policies and unwritten expectations.
    • Facilitate communication between program faculty (clinical and academic) and students when at-risk problems are identified.
    • Propose communication strategies between program faculty, deans, and academic officers when managing students identified as at-risk, placed on probation, or dismissed from the physical therapy education program.
    • Describe the typical steps taken when presented with legal action following a student dismissal.
    • Identify resources that can assist in the evaluation of students.
    • Identify examples or situations that indicate need for policies related to early identification and for policies associated with negotiating probationary status, dismissal, and appeals processes.

    Qualitative Methods: Everything You Want to Know But Were Unsure Whom to Ask

    Time: 3:00 pm–5:00 pm (See Program for Room)

    Level: Intermediate

    This is a joint program. See full description at Research programming.

    Redirecting Inappropriate Patient Sexual Behavior, Part 2

    Joint Program: Neurology

    Time: 3:00 pm–5:00 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Ziadee W. Cambier, PT, DPT

    Level: Basic

    Inappropriate patient sexual behavior (IPSB) is any verbal or physical act of an explicit or perceived sexual nature that is unacceptable within the social context in which it is carried out. IPSB encompasses a spectrum of patient behaviors, ranging from staring and suggestive remarks to genital exposure, forceful groping, and rape. IPSB is pervasive in clinical practice, experienced by as many as 85% of physical therapists during their career, and has significant negative consequences for both clinicians and patients. In Part 2 of this 2-part series, the speaker will demonstrate 3 verbal techniques for addressing IPSB, use small-group discussion and role-play to practice responses, outline specific strategies for cognitively impaired patients, and cover reporting and documentation. This session is appropriate for both individuals who wish to improve their responses to IPSB and educators interested in learning interactive teaching methods on this topic.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Recognize and reflect on your personal reactions to IPSB, evaluate IPSB situations, and select professional responses.
    • Utilize 3 assertive techniques in response to IPSB.
    • Apply strategies for addressing IPSB in cognitively impaired patients.
    • Document and report IPSB.

    Social Media and Technology for Physical Therapy Practice: Get Involved!

    Time: 3:00 pm–5:00 pm (See Program for Room)

    Level: Intermediate

    This is a joint program. See full description at Women's Health programming.

    Using Simulation to Bring Acute Care Into the Classroom

    Time: 3:00 pm–5:00 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Patricia J. Ohtake, PT, PhD; Pamela L. Bartlo, PT, DPT, CCS; Melissa Bednarek, PT, DPT, PhD; Patricia Gillette, PT, PhD, GCS, CSCS; Tiffany N. Hilton, PT, MPT, PhD; Nancy S. Smith, PT, DPT, GCS

    Level: Multiple Level

    Simulation, now a standard component of training in many health care professions, offers focused, deliberate practice in a safe, controlled environment. Patient simulators can range from human actors to sophisticated, computerized, whole body, mannequins. Both provide authentic, clinically relevant opportunities for experiential learning. The simulation process encourages students to be active and fully participative learners and provides PT students with low-risk opportunities to develop the skills, behaviors, and clinical decision making needed for safe and effective management of acute and critically ill patients. To date, simulation use in PT programs to teach patient management skills in the critical care environment has been limited. This session will review the development and delivery of simulation-based educational experiences and their use in teaching the management of patients with acute and critical illness. Available patient simulator technology and its applicability to specific teaching objectives will be explored. The speakers will present simulation research projects and examples of simulation use in PT education. Attendees will be able to engage the presenters in open discussion about the use of simulation in PT education.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Describe the development of the use of simulation in health care education.
    • Describe the use of simulation for teaching technical, behavioral, and cognitive skills
    • Recognize the use of simulation to promote interprofessional education.
    • Discuss the components of a simulation experience.
    • Compare and contrast the use of low-fidelity and high-fidelity simulators to achieve educational goals.
    • Describe outcomes of current research projects in acute care physical therapy student simulation experiences and identify key components of the simulation examples presented.

    Wednesday, January 23

    Academic and Clinical Collaboration to Manage Challenges in Clinical Education

    Time: 8:00 am–10:00 am (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Lee Nelson, PT; Deborah Pelletier, PT, MS; Mary M. Palaima, PT, MS; Donna Applebaum, PT, DPT, MS; Olga McSorley, PT, DPT, DCE; Ellen Wetherbee, PT, DPT, MEd, OCS; Regina Kaufman, PT, EdD, NCS

    Level: Multiple Level

    The presenters will describe a multi-year process by the New England Consortium of Academic Coordinators of Clinical Education in which physical therapist (PT) academic program directors, clinical education faculty, clinical directors, and Academic Coordinators/Directors of Clinical Education (ACCEs/DCEs) collaborated to identify how to create a sustainable model for clinical education (CE) given changes in health care, professional practice, and academia. The initiative was driven by concerns that current PT CE may not be sustainable, the development of APTA's Academic Council; the passage of the Affordable Care Act; and PT workforce shortage issues. Academic program chairs and ACCE/DCEs identified pressing concerns for academic and clinical educators and ways to explore them collaboratively. Focus group discussions revealed questions related to academic/clinical partnerships, clinical educator support, and strategies to manage challenges. Next, a group of 100 CE stakeholders representing various roles and settings met to discuss issues impacting PT education and clinical practice and envision PT delivery following health care reform. Information will be shared from the first 2 years of this process, including outcomes of the meetings and focus groups; themes, strategies, and action plans identified for optimizing CE; and development of opportunities to identify components of excellence in CE.

    Upon completion of this course, you’ll be able to:

    • Identify variables related to the changing health care, professional practice, and educational environments and their impact on physical therapist education and clinical practice.
    • Define key issues and challenges in education and practice across health professions and within the New England physical therapist education community.
    • Describe possible changes and resources needed to effectively manage clinical education.

    Clinical Reasoning: Explicit Strategies for Making the Invisible Visible

    Time: 8:00 am–10:00 am (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Nicole Christensen, PT, PhD, MAppSc; Lisa Black, PT, DPT; Gail Jensen, PT, PhD

    Level: Multiple Level

    Clinical reasoning is essential in learning "for" and learning "from" practice. Learning to reason should be experienced along a continuum of professional development, guided by curricula explicitly focused on the learning of and from clinical reasoning. To set the stage for the discussion, core concepts, definitions and models of clinical reasoning will be presented, and differentiated from related concepts such as critical thinking, reflection, and experiential learning. The importance of explicit and intentional teaching and learning of clinical reasoning that spans academic and clinical education settings is discussed as a critical component for students' development of professional competence. The presenters will share learning experiences from entry-level academic and clinical education teaching and curriculum and from within postprofessional education contexts such as residency and fellowship programs.

    Upon completion of this course, you’ll be able to:

    • Identify core concepts, working models, and applied theories of clinical reasoning that are essential to teaching and learning of clinical reasoning.
    • Distinguish between clinical reasoning, critical thinking, reflection, and experiential learning, and describe the ways in which these concepts relate to learning for and from practice.
    • Recognize how adoption of a common clinical reasoning model and language can assist in making invisible aspects of clinical reasoning visible, providing an essential framework for practice, discussion, critique, and learning related to clinical reasoning.
    • Discuss examples of strategies provided by the presenters intended to bridge the gap between teaching and learning of clinical reasoning in academic and clinical settings.
    • Develop strategies for teaching and learning clinical reasoning, applicable for their own current practice settings, designed to address perceived challenges contributing to the gap between academic and clinical education.

    Death to PowerPoint! High-tech to Low-tech Teaching Strategies for Cardiovascular/Pulmonary Education

    Time: 8:00 am–10:00 am (See Program for Room)

    Level: Multiple Level

    This is a joint program. See full description at Cardiovascular and Pulmonary programming.

    Follow Us! Lessons Learned Using Social Media in PT Programs

    Time: 8:00 am–10:00 am (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Mike Pascoe, PhD; Todd E. Davenport, PT, DPT; Timothy Noteboom, PT, PhD; Christopher Bise, PT, MS; James M. Elliott, PT, PhD

    Level: Basic

    Do you know Facebook from Foursquare? What are the benefits of joining LinkedIn? Is Pinterest of interest? Or are you just frustrated that your students "inappropriately" use Twitter in the classroom or clinic? Social media has been an area of success and consternation in physical therapy practice and education. Although the benefits of social media use have been realized from the level of the individual PT to the national organization, use within PT education programs is still relatively unexplored. However, a growing number of PT education programs in the United States have been using and critically examining various social media platforms for teaching, learning, and community/alumni outreach. The purpose of this session is to provide an overview of social media platforms and describe their potential use in a PT education program. Attendees will hear from several faculty members who have initiated social media tools to represent their university's PT program. Topics discussed will include the logistics of managing accounts; examples of content that is shared; role modeling of digital professionalism to PT students; and the potential effects of engaging alumni, potential students, and external stakeholders on program branding and student recruitment.

    Upon completion of this course, you’ll be able to:

    • Discuss the role of social media in PT students' professional development.
    • Observe many examples of social media use by PT education programs.
    • Describe the role of social media in outreach and community education efforts by PT programs.
    • Explain the benefits and challenges associated with managing a social media campaign.
    • Identify the fundamental questions that need to be addressed in order to create a customized social media plan for a PT program.

    Genomics, Part 1—Linking Molecules and Genes to Clinical Practice: A Closer Look at the Spine

    Time: 8:00 am–10:00 am (See Program for Room)

    Level: Basic

    This is a joint program. See full description at Neurology programming.

    I Want to Start Teaching in the Classroom: What's Next, Part 1

    Joint Program: Cardiovascular and Pulmonary, Geriatrics

    Time: 8:00 am–10:00 am (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Kathy D. Hall, PT, EdD; Willam E. Healey, PT, EdD, GCS

    Level: Basic

    Clinicians frequently have the desire to participate in the academic classroom, but they are not necessarily prepared to do so. This educational session and the companion session are designed to provide the clinician with an introduction to the most important skills required to successfully assume the role of clinician educator in the academic setting. The first educational session will focus on the role of the clinician educator, learner characteristics, teaching methodologies, and course objectives.

    Upon completion of this course, you’ll be able to:

    • Describe the role of clinicians in the academic setting.
    • Compare the differences and expectations between the academy and the clinical setting.
    • Describe the difference between a curriculum and continuing education.
    • Discuss the relationship between accreditation criteria, program mission, curricular design, and course content.
    • Identify different learning styles and how these impact learning.
    • Describe teaching methods that stimulate active learning.
    • Describe the role of learning objectives in facilitating development of course content, teaching methods, and assessment of outcomes.

    Teaching, Learning, and Practicing Electrotherapy

    Time: 8:00 am–10:00 am (See Program for Room)

    Level: Multiple Level

    This is a joint program. See full description at Clinical Electrophysiology and Wound Management programming.

    Fitness Screening for Senior Games Athletes

    Time: 11:00 am–1:00 pm (See Program for Room)

    Level: Basic

    This is a joint program. See full description at Geriatrics programming.

    Genomics, Part 2—Linking Molecules and Genes to Clinical Practice: A Closer Look at the Spine

    Time: 11:00 am–1:00 pm (See Program for Room)

    Level: Basic

    This is a joint program. See full description at Neurology programming.

    The Informal and Hidden Curriculum in Physical Therapy Education

    Time: 11:00 am–1:00 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Debra Sellheim, PT, PhD; Lisa Dutton, PT, PhD

    Level: Basic

    The informal and hidden curriculum in education consists of influences not explicitly included in a curriculum but communicated to learners covertly—sometimes what is not said is more powerful than what is said. Hafferty described the learning environment in medicine as encompassing 3 areas: (1) the formal curriculum or that which is explicitly stated; (2) the informal curriculum or teaching and learning that occur through informal faculty and student interactions; and (3) the hidden curriculum through which organizational structure and culture exert influence. While the formal curriculum is explicit and its influence more easily identified, the informal and hidden curricula can have a significant impact on students' attitudes, knowledge, and behavior. This session will present the findings of a qualitative research study examining the informal and hidden curriculum in physical therapy education. Attendees will have the opportunity to discuss the informal and hidden curriculum in their clinical and academic settings as well as implications/changes that should be considered at the program, policy, and institutional levels to change or strengthen the hidden messages sent to students. Through increased understanding of the hidden curriculum, academic and clinical physical therapy educators will be better able to address potential negative influences and strengthen and support influences that may be positive.

    Upon completion of this course, you’ll be able to:

    • Examine and apply current literature from various health professions on the hidden and informal curriculum to the profession of physical therapy (clinic, PT/PTA academic setting).
    • Discuss the impact the informal and hidden curriculum has on student learning and professional development.
    • Appreciate Doctor of Physical Therapy (DPT) students' perspectives of the informal and hidden curriculum in physical therapy education.
    • Explore components of the informal and hidden curriculum within your own academic or clinical environment.
    • Identify 1-2 programs, policies, and/or institutional level changes that have the potential to positively influence the informal and hidden messages sent to physical therapy students.

    I Want to Start Teaching in the Classroom: What's Next, Part 2

    Joint Program: Cardiovascular and Pulmonary, Geriatrics

    Time: 11:00 am–1:00 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Kathy D. Hall, PT, EdD; Willam E. Healey, PT, EdD, GCS

    Level: Basic

    Clinicians seeking to teach in the academic setting would benefit from structured training in assessment of student performance, evaluation of his/her own teaching performance, and fostering professional behaviors in students. This second part of a 2-part educational session further describes the skills necessary for clinician educators to make a positive contribution in the classroom. In addition to discussion of student and teacher evaluations and student professional behaviors, a panel of clinician educators will present their stories on transitioning from full-time clinician to part-time classroom teacher.

    Upon completion of this course, you’ll be able to:

    • Discuss varied methods of assessing student performance.
    • Describe the construction of rubrics to assess student performance.
    • Discuss methods used to evaluate and improve teacher performance.
    • Identify strategies to foster the development of student professional behaviors.

    Outcome Measures Recommendations From the Neurology Section Spinal Cord Injury EDGE Task Force

    Time: 11:00 am–1:00 pm (See Program for Room)

    Level: Multiple Level

    This is a joint program. See full description at Neurology programming.

    Student Forum: Clinical Collaboration Among PTs and PTAs

    Level: Basic

    This is a joint program. See full description at Geriatrics programming.

    There's an App for That! Using Technology for Practice and Learning

    Joint Program: Women's Health

    Time: 11:00 am–1:00 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Julie K. Tilson, PT, DPT, MS, NCS; Rob Landel, DPT, OCS, FAPTA

    Level: Multiple Level

    Integration of iPads in the clinic and the classroom can lead to exciting new avenues for practice and learning. In clinics, iPads are changing the way that physical therapists care for patients, document, access reference and research information, and network with colleagues. In classrooms, iPads are changing the way that learners access and store information and how they collaborate with teachers and fellow learners. This program will be based on current evidence for the use of tablet computing in the clinic and classroom and on an 18-month pilot project with third-year Doctor of Physical Therapy (DPT) students. The first half of the presentation will address use of iPads to enhance clinical practice.

    The second half will address use of iPads to enhance classroom learning. The presenters will illustrate iPad-enhanced patient care and classroom learning through a series of case examples. Attendees will have the opportunity to share their favorite apps through a live twitter feed #bestPTapps. The formal presentation will be followed by a hands-on exhibition and more opportunities for sharing innovative ideas and apps. If you have an iPad or iPhone, bring it! If you don't, come and see why you just might need one! (Full disclosure: We don't own stock in Apple!)

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Describe how an iPad can enhance your clinical practice.
    • Describe how iPads are being used by students to promote learning.
    • Describe how you can take advantage of the iPads that your students are bringing to class or the clinic.
    • Summarize existing evidence for the use of mobile technology in the clinic and classroom.
    • Assess the type and quality of apps for use in the clinic and the classroom.

    The 2012–2013 Guide to Physical Therapist Practice: Implications of Revisions

    Time: 3:00 pm–5:00 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Mary Fran Delaune, PT, MPT

    Level: Intermediate

    The Guide to Physical Therapist Practice continues to be an essential resource for practice and the professional education of physical therapists. The Guide defines scope of practice, guides clinical practice, impacts quality of care, promotes appropriate and standardized terminology, and explains physical therapist practice to insurers, policymakers, and other health care professionals. In this session, the most recent revisions will be discussed including the process for revision, key changes, and the criteria developed and used for scope of practice decisions. In addition, the proposed format will be reviewed with other resources (PTNow, Hooked on Evidence, etc) to illustrate an effective strategy to integrate the Guide and APTA's evidence-based and professional resources into the classroom.

    Upon completion of this course, you’ll be able to:

    • Summarize the process used for revising the Guide to Physical Therapists Practice.
    • Describe the key revisions to the patient management model and explain the rationale for these changes.
    • List the new categories for both tests and measures and interventions and identify key changes in both description and format.
    • Examine opportunities to effectively integrate the newly revised Guide to Physical Therapist Practice, in conjunction with PTNow and other key resources in the classroom.

    2013 Pauline Cerasoli Lecture—Life Lessons: Teaching for Learning That Lasts

    Time: 3:00 pm–5:00 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Elizabeth Mostrom, PT, PhD

    Level: Multiple Level

    In this lecture to honor the memory and distinguished career of the late Pauline "Polly" Cerasoli, PT, PhD, the speaker will discuss the diverse landscape of teaching and learning in physical therapy education and practice. As therapists and educators, we are both teachers and learners as we traverse the varied and often unpredictable terrains of clinical and teaching practice. The speaker will encourage all educators to consider how they can transform "everyday" experiences and "ordinary" teachable moments into lasting "life lessons" by recognizing and exploiting the power of narrative as a rich resource for gaining new knowledge, insights, and deeper understandings of ourselves, our learners, and our profession.

    Interactive Learning With Technology in the PTA Classroom

    Time: 3:00 pm–5:00 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Betsy J. Becker, PT; Nikki Sleddens, PT, MPT

    Level: basic

    Are you looking for interactive learning activities using technology in the classroom? Join fellow PTA educators for a workshop sharing several methods, including instructional objectives, design, and implementation for each. The following will be reviewed: Wiki for teaching cultural and ethnic sensitivity, iPad apps for instruction, audience response systems/clickers, YouTube for teaching wheelchair mobility, and self-reflection/professionalism using Wordle and Prezi.

    Upon completion of this course, you’ll be able to:

    • Review educational methodology supporting the use of active learning with technology.
    • Summarize design and implementation for specific activities for PTA education using interactive technology.
    • Discuss grading methods for interactive learning.

    Problem-based Learning Strategies in Physical Therapy Curricula and Clinical Practice

    Time: 3:00 pm–5:00 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Caterina Abraham, PT, DPT, MPH; Mark Drnach, PT, DPT, MBA, PCS; Craig Ruby, PT, MPT, DEd; Rhonda Haley, PT, DPT, ATC; Kristine Grubler, PT; Maureen McKenna, PT, PhD, LPC; Allen Marangoni, PT, EdD, MMSc, RRT; Alison Kreger, PT, DPT, PCS

    Level: Intermediate

    There is evidence that learning is most effective in an open, engaged, self-directed, active environment. In physical therapy education, as well as in other medical and allied health professions, there is a growing trend to include more self-directed learning strategies—such as problem-based learning (PBL). This session will provide the background and rationale for PBL and the process used to facilitate a small group toward the achievement of identified educational objectives. Common techniques to address positive and negative behaviors will be presented, discussed, and practiced.

    The presenters also will discuss inclusion of PBL strategies during clinical education and use of PBL principles for professional development to enhance the clinical decision making process in students and clinicians of physical therapy. Participants will form small groups to work through a case. A faculty member will be assigned to each small group to facilitate the discussion and achievement of learning objectives. Group roles will be identified and assigned to highlight and promote group dynamics. Evaluation and discussion of the group dynamics and learning outcomes will be included in the lecture and participation portions of this session.

    Upon completion of this course, you’ll be able to:

    • Articulate the defining characteristics of PBL.
    • Discuss the evidence supporting a problem-based versus a traditional-learning educational model.
    • Define and demonstrate the roles necessary within the small-group discussion process.
    • Identify the differences in clinical decision making between the novice and expert clinician.
    • Identify necessary behaviors to become successful in leading small group tutorials both in academic and clinical settings.
    • Define meta-cognition and its importance to the decision making process in health care fields.

    Thursday, January 24

    Classifying Evidence: Putting the Horse in Front of the Cart

    Time: 8:00 am–10:00 am (See Program for Room)

    Level: Multiple Level

    This is a joint program. See full description at Research programming.

    Enhancing Educational Research: Advice From the Journal of Physical Therapy Education (JOPTE) Editorial Board

    Joint Program: Research

    Time: 8:00 am–10:00 am (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Laurita Hack, PhD; Jan Gwyer, PT, PhD

    Level: Multiple Level

    Do you have questions about preparing your completed educational research for publication? Meet with the editorial board from the Journal of Physical Therapy Education (JOPTE) to discuss important topics for research; common flaws in methodology and ways to overcome them; and ways to improve manuscript quality, thereby improving the quality of your research and the opportunities for publication.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Identify major strengths and weaknesses found in educational research submitted to JOPTE for publication.
    • Discover strategies to strengthen educational research methods.
    • Discuss the submission and review process for submission of manuscripts to JOPTE.

    Successful Mentors and Protégés Within the Community of Practice

    Time: 8:00 am–10:00 am (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Heidi Dunfee, PT, DScPT; Margaret M. Plack, PT, EdD; Aaron Rindflesch, PT, MPT, PhD, NCS; Maryanne Driscoll, PhD; Jennifer Halvaksz, PT, DPT

    Level: Intermediate

    Are you responsible for mentoring residents, students, or new staff? Why is mentorship in the clinical setting so important and yet often so challenging? While the development of expert knowledge in the classroom is critical, it is insufficient to produce competent physical therapists. Competence requires not only knowledge and skills, but also the development of a professional identity. Mentors can provide the link between classroom learning and the development of a professional identity. Being a mentor requires skills that differ from those of your traditional classroom instructor. In today's fast-paced clinical environment, effective mentors use their community of practice to efficiently facilitate the professional development of their protégés. In this workshop, the speakers will examine the role and responsibilities of the mentor and the protégé in the clinical setting; analyze effective communication strategies and supports to learning within the physical therapy community of practice; and evaluate a variety of strategies that can be used to facilitate the development of your protégé.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Examine the roles and responsibilities of the mentor and the protégé.
    • Analyze effective communication strategies and barriers/supports to learning within the physical therapy community of practice.
    • Apply the concept of the learning triad to the mentorship relationship.
    • Analyze the potential challenges and supports to learning within the clinical setting.
    • Apply the principles of communities of practice to designing an efficient mentorship relationship.
    • Evaluate a variety of strategies that can be used to facilitate the development of your protégé.

    TBI EDGE Recommendations: Application to Practice, Teaching, and Research

    Time: 8:00 am–10:00 am (See Program for Room)

    Level: Multiple Level

    This is a joint program. See full description at Neurology programming.

    Threading a Fitness Component Throughout a PTA Program

    Time: 8:00 am–10:00 am (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Rebecca S. Crocker, PT, DPT; Niki Wallen, PTA

    Level: Intermediate

    This 2-hour interactive, educational session will explore why and how a physical therapist assistant program integrates a fitness component within the overall curriculum. Attendees will have the opportunity to experience a sampling of offerings of fitness activities incorporated within a PTA program curriculum. The session will include small-group discussions to explore the many ways to connect the fitness focus with the ongoing development of physical therapist assistant students.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Identify the evidence that points to the need for incorporating a fitness component into the overall PTA curriculum.
    • Justify how a fitness activity commitment within a PTA program can address core documents that guide the development of a PTA curriculum.
    • Develop an objective (within at least 3 PTA program courses) that links the concepts learned through fitness activities with the concepts to be learned within the particular courses.
    • Propose how one might use the fitness component to teach documentation skills.
    • Examine the use of the fitness component as students progress through the curriculum.

    ACCE in a PTA Program: More Than Matching Students and Clinical Sites

    Time: 11:00 am–1:00 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Jennifer Jewell, PT, DPT; Pamela Pologruto, PT, DPT

    Level: Multiple Level

    The role of an academic coordinator of clinical education (ACCE) in the PTA education setting can be very challenging. Most ACCEs function as full-time instructors in the didactic curriculum and advisors to students as well as fulfilling their obligations as ACCE. Navigating through student placements and potential barriers can be very time-consuming and now, with the increased emphasis on pre-clinical background checks and clearances, the demands have become even greater. This session will present attendees with resources to augment the role of the ACCE in PTA education. The speakers will explore current trends and difficulties related to clinical education among PTA programs. Attendees will discuss barriers and develop strategies to address challenges facing their programs.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Define the multifaceted role of the ACCE within PTA education programs.
    • Develop an understanding of the resources available through APTA to assist with task management related to PTA clinical education.
    • Explore current trends among PTA schools with regard to clinical assignment, clinical instructor assessment, clinical education program assessment, reimbursement issues, clearances, and pre-clinical requirements.
    • Discuss CAPTE evaluative criteria as related to the role of the ACCE and PTA clinical education.
    • Develop clinical education tools and strategies to use within your program to address challenges in PTA clinical education.

    Applications of Team-based Learning in Physical Therapy Education

    Time: 11:00 am–1:00 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Cecilia Graham, PT, PhD; Diane Clark, PT, DScPT; Donald Lein, PT, PhD; John D. Lowman, PT, PhD, CCS

    Level: Basic

    Team-based learning (TBL) was developed by Larry Michaelsen in the early 1990s as a way to build individual, group, and whole-class accountability. The TBL approach integrates principles of active learning, critical thinking, and student accountability. The focus of classroom activities in TBL is on application, rather than acquisition, of course material. This methodology has been used and studied extensively in other professions, including medicine and business. Results of these studies generally indicate positive student perceptions of TBL and enhanced course performance, especially by academically weaker students.

    The purpose of this 2-hour interactive session is to explore the use of TBL in physical therapy education programs. Attendees will have the opportunity to engage in a simulated TBL session and discuss the theoretical basis, key principles, and logistics of this methodology. Session facilitators will provide their rationale for choosing to use TBL in a DPT curriculum and share outcomes of use of TBL in coursework involving basic physical therapy skills and patient/client management of individuals with cardiovascular/pulmonary, integumentary, and neurological disorders.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Discuss the theoretical basis of team-based learning (TBL).
    • Describe key TBL design principles.
    • Describe logistical aspects of TBL team assignments, grading rubrics, student orientation to the learning process, and course evaluation.
    • Develop a TBL learning module that includes pre-readings, individual readiness assurance tests, group readiness assurance tests, appeals, mini-lectures, and in-class application activities.
    • Analyze the feasibility of integrating TBL into physical therapy academic curricula, continuing education, and PT-led community education activities.

    Dianne Cherry Forum: Best Practices in Pediatric Physical Therapy Education

    Time: 11:00 am–1:00 pm (See Program for Room)

    Level: Multiple Level

    This is a joint program. See full description at Pediatrics programming.

    The Script Concordance Test: Evaluating Clinical Reasoning

    Time: 11:00 am–1:00 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Brett Windsor, PT, MPA, OCS, FAAOMPT

    Level: Basic

    At the core of physical therapy practice is the ability to make clinical decisions in the context of uncertainty. This requires the integration of factual knowledge, judgment, insight, experience, and the written evidence. The skill is not visible or tangible, and it is difficult to evaluate using current tests. This session will investigate the Script Concordance Test (SCT), a contemporary method of assessing clinical reasoning that stems from the cognitive theory of clinical expertise development. The SCT is gaining acceptance in the education of the health professions, but is seldom used in physical therapy. The SCT can be used within any specialty of physical therapy practice, at any level of expertise. Scoring of the SCT reflects the degree of concordance of clinical judgments to those of a reference panel of experts. Attendees will engage in the process of constructing, establishing reliability for, and scoring an SCT. They will be guided through the process of taking an SCT, including the specific instructions given to test-takers. Profession-wide implications will be discussed and a forum will be provided for questions and feedback.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Define the term "Script Concordance Test."
    • Describe the history and development of the Script Concordance Test.
    • Briefly describe the cognitive theory of clinical expertise development as it relates to the development of clinical-reasoning skills.
    • Discuss the body of literature supporting the use of the Script Concordance testing in the education of health care professionals.
    • Recognize the role that the Script Concordance Test currently plays in the evaluation and prediction of clinical performance.
    • Describe the steps involved in compiling a "reference panel" appropriate to the scoring of a Script Concordance Test.
    • Demonstrate the construction of a Script Concordance Test case scenario and 3 associated test items.
    • Demonstrate the method used to accurately score a Script Concordance Test case scenario and 3 associated test items.
    • Discuss the implications of the Script Concordance Test and the opportunities for adoption into the education of preprofessional and postprofessional physical therapy students.

    Tips for Developing Mixed-Methods Research

    Time: 11:00 am–1:00 pm (See Program for Room)

    Level: Multiple Level

    This is a joint program. See full description at Research programming.

    Integrating Learning and Research With Health Promotion in a DPT Curriculum

    Time: 3:00 pm–5:00 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Jean M. Irion, EdD, PT, SCS, ATC; Coral Gubler, PhD, PT, ATC

    Level: Intermediate

    Coordination of research, service learning, active learning, and client education experiences gives meaning to learning events; results in rewarding practice; and provides benefits to the academician, student, and local community. This session will describe a novel approach to combining several aspects of DPT education to provide a lifestyle intervention that is rewarding to both DPT students and community participants.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Coordinate research endeavors with service and active-learning experiences.
    • Engage student learners to transform them from passive learners to active engagers, while having fun in the process.
    • Use an existing state initiative for healthy weight loss to provide research, learning, and service opportunities for faculty and students.
    • Develop online venues to disseminate health promotion and prevention information on the topics of lifestyle changes, particularly those regarding nutrition and physical activity.
    • Prepare the DPT student to integrate education, service, and research into clinical practice.

    The Metatheory of Resilience and Resiliency and Physical Therapy

    Time: 3:00 pm–5:00 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Janette Olsen, PhD; Cindy Seiger, PT, PhD

    Level: Multiple Level

    This course will introduce participants to the "Metatheory of Resilience and Resiliency" and how to incorporate it into physical therapy practice. Attendees will be introduced to several behavior-change theories and how the theories are or could be incorporated into every physical therapy intervention. Unfortunately, the way in which these theories frequently are used may not directly address patient motivation for change. The Metatheory of Resilience and Resiliency addresses personal motivational drives and how they are related to health regulating behaviors; it can be used to facilitate patients' motivation for change. The 3 "waves" of the Metatheory will be described and illustrated using clinical cases and the International Classification of Function, Disability, and Health (ICF). Attendees will have the opportunity to experience "resilience" training to learn how to promote optimal outcomes through accessing the Metatheory "wave 3 drives."

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Briefly describe and discuss how physical therapists and physical therapy assistants use behavior-change theories during interventions.
    • Describe and discuss the 3 waves of the Metatheory of Resilience and Resiliency, including the components of protective factors, resilience, and resiliency.
    • Use clinical case scenarios to illustrate the 3 waves of the Metatheory of Resilience and Resiliency, including how it applies to current interventions and patient goals.
    • Develop treatment strategies that address wave 3 drives through clinical case scenarios and addressing the ICF model.
    • Discuss how resiliency and resilience training may be implemented in patient care and self-improvement.

    Writing an Abstract for Presentation

    Joint Program: Research

    Time: 3:00 pm–5:00 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Steve Tippett, PT, PhD, SCS; Maura D. Iversen, PT, DPT, SD, MPH; Jenny Rodriguez, PT, MHS

    Level: Intermediate

    One goal of APTA's Education Section is to "promote scholarly activities and access to new knowledge that facilitates evidence-based practices" in physical therapy education. Physical therapy faculty face increased emphasis on scholarly work for tenure and promotion and to meet the Commission on Accreditation for Physical Therapy Education (CAPTE) criterion for faculty scholarship. An educational research agenda is available to faculty who do not have the research infrastructure or clinical contacts for bench or clinical research. One critical component of doing educational research is presenting that research at national meetings.

    This session, conducted by the Education Section Research Committee, is designed for academic or clinical faculty who wish to do educational research but are having problems developing acceptable abstracts for presentation. The presenters will explore key features of good abstracts including questions such as the following: "Why did you start?" "What did you do?" "What did you find?" and "What does it mean?" Different abstract formats will be discussed; good and problem abstracts will be compared. Participants are encouraged to bring abstracts, research ideas, or research results and work in groups to improve the abstracts or develop abstracts based upon research ideas or results.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Discuss the components of a good abstract.
    • Apply the components of a good abstract to developing an abstract.
    • Critique abstracts to improve them.
    • Write a successful abstract.
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