Archive: CSM 2013: Geriatrics Programming

  • This is archived programming for CSM 2013. See current programming.

    Browse Geriatrics sessions by day. Return to the main topic menu 

    Monday, January 21 | Tuesday, January 22 | Wednesday, January 23 | Thursday, January 24 

    * Should you choose to preselect regular (not preconference) Tuesday-Thursday sessions during the registration process, please be advised that preselection is not a guarantee of a seat. Attendees are asked to preselect to better determine room size and all efforts will be made to accommodate sessions in the largest rooms possible. All attendees are encouraged to show up to sessions early. Attendees are also encouraged to select alternative sessions in the event their first choice is full. 

    Monday, January 21 (Preconference)

    Focus Geriatrics: The Aging Adult

    Location: San Diego Convention Center | 15B

    Time: 8:00 am - 5:00 pm

    Speakers: Jill Heitzman, PT, DPT, GCS, CWS, CEEAA, FACCWS; Ellen Strunk, PT, MS, GCS, CEEAA

    Level: Intermediate

    CEUs: 0.9 (9.0 contact hours/CCUs)

    Preconference Pricing: Standard (1A)

    A physical therapist working with the aging adult needs to understand the difference between normal aging changes and pathological changes in all systems. These changes—along with the increased frequency of diagnosis—affect physical activity, activities of daily living, and other functional limitations that can accelerate the decline to frailty. Focus Geriatrics is an ongoing, updated course that addresses these changes to enable the physical therapist to adequately address aging issues and promote successful aging. This course will look at the changing demographics and the changes in the major systems: musculoskeletal, neurological, cardiovascular/pulmonary, and integumentary.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Recognize the normal aging process of the musculoskeletal, neurological, cardiovascular/pulmonary, and integumentary systems.
    • Discuss the relationship between the aging process and function.
    • Describe pathologies that commonly occur in aging adults.
    • Discuss physical therapy interventions used to minimize potential consequences of pathologies that typically occur with aging.
    • Explain nutritional requirements for a healthy musculoskeletal system for the aging adult.
    • Summarize the impact of prescription medications on the aging systems.
    • Recognize the importance of exercise capacity for older adults.
    • Explain normal and abnormal vital signs at rest and as a response to exercise.
    • Apply principles of exercise prescription to the elderly, both for normal aging and for those with diseases.
    • Discuss demographic changes that affect outcomes, particularly the changing family dynamics.

    Cleveland Clinic Osteoporosis and Bone Health Education Program

    Location: San Diego Convention Center | 15A

    Time: 8:00 am - 5:30 pm

    Speakers: Michele Hribar, PT; Maribeth Gibbon, PT; Jennifer Ochi, DPT; Mary S. Morrison, PT, DScPT, MHS

    Level: Intermediate

    CEUs: 0.8 (8.0 contact hours/CCUs)

    Preconference Pricing: Standard (1A)

    The Cleveland Clinic Osteoporosis and Bone Health Special Interest Group Clinician Education Program course directly relates to physical therapy professionals by providing insight into a population served in inpatient, outpatient, and home health care settings. Many Americans present with and are at risk for developing osteoporosis. Fractures related to osteoporosis can cause pain and disability. Through exercise, education, identifying risk factors, and balance/fall prevention activities, physical therapists can appropriately manage their clients to optimize outcomes by reducing disability, pain, and minimizing disease progression. The goal is for health care professionals to provide a consistent, safe examination and plan of care for patients with osteoporosis as a primary or secondary diagnosis as well as those with low bone density.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Define and list signs of osteoporosis.
    • Differentiate characteristics of low bone density/osteoporosis from healthy bone.
    • Describe difference between bone mineral density and bone mineral content and how they are measured. Introduce the FRAX tool for fracture risk assessment.
    • Provide an example of an examination template citing evidence for focused assessments.
    • Discuss the importance of back extensor strength and site specific therapeutic exercise using a population-based exercise prescription chart.
    • Describe an appropriate exercise program for each population, giving specific exercise examples across the continuum of care.
    • Discuss medical management, including current pharmacological interventions and surgical procedures.
    • Describe appropriate body mechanics for a patient with osteoporosis, including the importance of postural alignment.

    Tai Chi Fundamentals® Professional Training Program: Level 1

    Location: San Diego Convention Center | 14B

    Time: 8:00 am - 5:30 pm

    Speakers: Kristi Hallisy, PT, DSc, OCS, CMPT, CTI

    Level: Basic

    CEUs: 0.9 (9.0 contact hours/CCUs)

    Preconference Pricing: Standard Plus (1B)

    In this 1-day course, Attendees learn mind-body principles for health promotion and wellness and the 12 Tai Chi Fundamentals® (TCF) movement patterns that support the sequencing of the TCF form. Tai chi movement is introduced in a motor-development sequence integrating mind/body exercise components. Instruction includes diaphragmatic breath work, sensory awareness, visualization, and motor-control sequencing for weight-bearing tai chi and its seated applications. This course not only qualifies for APTA CEUs, but it fulfills 8 of the 30 contact hours for TCF Instructor Certification Levels 1 and 2 (refer to www.taichihealth.com for more details). The Tai Chi Fundamentals® program has a wide range of applications for therapy and function, including: geriatrics, musculoskeletal and neurological rehabilitation, pain management, sports training, cardiovascular and respiratory diseases, functional capacity for the medically complex, chronic fatigue, fibromyalgia, and special populations. It can be used in a variety of treatment settings, including hospitals, sub-acute, outpatient clinics, and home care. In addition, tai chi can be taught individually or in group settings in community wellness classes, senior centers, and long-term care facilities.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Describe the mind-body, biomedical, biomechanical, and functional benefits of tai chi.
    • Demonstrate 12 Tai Chi Fundamentals® movement patterns and their seated adaptations.
    • Integrate somatosensory, proprioceptive, sensorimotor elements of tai chi into treatment protocols.
    • Apply tai chi as therapeutic exercise for function, rehabilitation, and wellness.
    • Discuss evidence-based practice and documentation for tai chi in physical therapy practice

    Strategies for Successful Residency and Fellowship Mentoring

    Location: San Diego Convention Center | 5A

    Joint Program: Education

    Time: 8:00 am - 5:30 pm

    Speakers: Carol Jo Tichenor, PT, MA; Gail Jensen, PT, PhD; Ivan Matsui, PT, FAAOMPT; Greg Hartley, PT, DPT, GCS

    Level: Intermediate

    CEUs: 0.8 (8.0 contact hours/CCUs)

    Preconference Pricing: Standard (1A)

    Professional competence goes well beyond technical skills. Competence builds on a foundation of basic clinical skills, scientific knowledge, and moral development. Mentorship is a critical element in the formation of a professional. This course will provide the attendees with in-depth instruction in the skills necessary for residency and fellowship clinical mentoring and an opportunity to apply those skills in interactive problem-solving situations. This 8-hour course is directed toward academic and clinical educators who are currently teaching in or considering developing residency and fellowship programs. The course is designed to guide individuals in how to design, implement, and evaluate mentoring experiences in postgraduate residencies and fellowships. Topics will include: characteristics of a good mentor and how mentoring differs from traditional teaching; how to structure productive mentoring sessions to facilitate clinical reasoning; strategies for mentoring the difficult resident; planning remediation sessions; methods for facilitating communication between faculty members and between faculty and residents; and assessment of the effectiveness of the mentoring experiences. The speakers also will discuss strategies that can be applied to mentoring colleagues and entry-level students.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Compare and contrast the characteristics of a good mentor in relation to one's own clinical teaching experience.
    • Analyze and structure mentoring experiences to facilitate reflective thinking and enhance clinical growth for the resident and for the faculty mentor.
    • Develop strategies for addressing common mentoring challenges in residency and fellowship programs.
    • Guide the resident in implementing strategies for change.
    • Design activities for developing and evaluating mentoring skills for new faculty members.

    Tuesday, January 22

    Building Bridges: Physical Therapy and Wellness Partnering for Success

    Time: 8:00 am–10:00 am (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Jennifer Sidelinker, PT, GCS; Rebecca Tarbert, PT, MSPT, CLT

    Level: Intermediate

    Physical therapy and wellness professionals offer unique essential skills and expertise in the care of older adults. When they work effectively in partnership and as part of a continuum, this supports successful outcomes for all older adults across the spectrum of function. Physical therapy professionals do not always acknowledge or embrace their scope of practice and unique role when it comes to health promotion and wellness. Session attendees will learn physical therapy and wellness partnership best practices to create a continuum of care supporting successful outcomes for older adults at all levels of function and in all domains of wellness. Cases, examples, and illustrations will be provided on many levels including: organizational/strategic, local, and evidence-based program specific levels. A variety of programs and initiatives will be illustrated representing some of the greatest areas of interest and concern for older adults.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Build bridges between physical therapy and wellness professionals by: integrating wellness concepts throughout physical therapy episodes of care, offering evidence-based programs in wellness, and using common objective measures across the physical therapy and wellness spectrum to promote common language for progress and support of the continuum.
    • Describe an effective physical therapy wellness continuum and best practices for communication and partnership between rehab and wellness professionals.
    • Understand the physical therapy professional's role in health promotion and wellness through evidence and support from professional organizations/scope of practice definitions and national initiatives such as Healthy People 2020.

    Geriatrics Balance & Falls SIG: Preventing Injuries and Rehospitalizations

    Time: 8:00 am–10:00 am (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Melanie DeSumma, PT, MSPT; Susan L. Whitney, PT, DPT, PhD, NCS, FAPTA; Tiffany Shubert, PT, MPT, PhD; Cielita Lopez-Lennon, PT, DPT, NCS

    Level: Intermediate

    This will be an intermediate-level course intended to serve clinicians in fall prevention across the continuum of care, from acute and subacute care to SNF, outpatient, and community settings. While the environments, the variables that influence fall risk, and the capabilities are quite different across the various populations, the goal remains the same: patient safety and fall prevention! The presentation will include literature review, current treatments, new technologies, and the latest in both fall prevention strategies and screening at-risk clients. Finally, we will discuss strategies for enabling a more seamless continuum of care whether you are under one health care system or are a solo practitioner. Let's be a part of the solution to not only decrease injury and fall risk but decrease rehospitalization—it's a team approach across the health care continuum.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Identify 3 technological advances in monitoring systems and fall prevention.
    • Describe 2 strategies for identifying persons at-risk for falls in each aspect of the rehabilitation continuum.
    • Identify 3 different evidence-based strategies for reducing fall risk.

    Changing Family Dynamics' Affect on Health Care

    Joint Program: Home Health

    Time: 11:00 am–1:00 pm (See Program for Room)

     Speakers: Jill Heitzman, PT, DPT, GCS, CWS, CEEAA, FACCWS; Charles Gulas, PT, PhD, GCS

    Level: Multiple Level

    This course will look at the aging adult and the various family dynamics that occur with aging as well as other society changes, including increased sexual activity in the aging population. An in-depth look at the various types of families will also include immigration issues, gender issues, sexual orientation, and long-distance families. There will also be the discussion of the changing relationship of the grandparent and grandchild and how this affects the geriatrician's interaction with the pediatricians. A tool called the Family APGAR (F-APGAR) will be introduced as a way for health care providers to recognize the need for referrals to assist in improving the family dynamics for more successful health care interaction.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Describe the different definitions and composition of family.
    • Discuss the health care needs of the aging adult in relation to culture/ethnicity.
    • Discuss the relationship changes that occur when the grandparent becomes the primary provider.
    • Educate the aging population on the risk of sexual activity.
    • Apply the F-APGAR in clinical setting.

    Somatosensory Reweighting: Untapped Resources in Balance Rehab

    Time: 11:00 am–1:00 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Mike Studier

    Level: Multiple Level

    This is an intermediate to advanced program that will enlighten attendees to frequently unrecognized opportunities in balance retraining for patients with impaired balance. The focus will be placed on rehabilitation of patients with sensory impairment: neuropathy, vestibulopathy, incomplete spinal cord injury, and in some cases stroke. This program will also cover recent technological advances that will allow us to better detect, classify, treat, and analyze rehabilitative gains in various forms of balance impairment. Direct clinical applications will include improved testing and rehabilitation individuals with nonspecific visual dependence.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Reliably test and identify patients with abnormal or pathologic visual dependence in balance.
    • Critically appraise balance measures for their ability to determine sensory contributions to the examination.
    • Identify and apply treatment options to reduce abnormal sensory dependence in balance for multiple conditions.

    Posturing for the Future

    Time: 3:00 pm–5:00 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Sherri Betz, PT, CEEAA

    Level: Intermediate

    The purpose of this course is to introduce attendees to an innovative and creative Pilates-based model for working with the fit or frail patient/client with osteoporosis in groups or in one-to-one physical therapy treatment settings. Learn to triage patients into a fit or frail category with a simple screening process. Learn how to introduce alignment, breathing, and core control using Pilates-based principles, followed by appropriate selection and sequencing of exercises for success with extremity strengthening, core control, postural changes, reduction of kyphosis, and balance. Discussions on controversial topics such as spinal flexion, side bending and rotation, vibration, cycling and swimming and their effects on bone will be a hallmark of the course. Precautions and contraindications will be clearly explained with supporting evidence.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Apply the definitions of osteoporosis and osteopenia in evaluation and treatment in clinical practice.
    • Identify risk factors for osteoporosis in all ages.
    • Explain how the diagnosis and screening process for osteoporosis relates to fracture prevention.
    • Perform the FRAC® Risk Assessment on every patient at risk for fracture.
    • Select physical therapy evaluation and interventions specific to patients with osteoporosis.
    • Apply current research in teaching effective exercise for bone health and avoid high fracture risk exercise for osteoporotic patients.
    • Discuss fracture prevention tips with patients and students.
    • Avoid contraindicated movements and exercises in patient programs.
    • Learn and practice unique postural correction cues, activities and exercises to teach in individual or group sessions based on the work of Paul Hodges and Ron Fletcher.
    • Organize group exercise classes for the optimum learning of the individual participants.
    • Apply imagery and tactile cueing in teaching Pilates exercises for effective and fast patient performance.

    Repeated Incremental Predictable Perturbations Balance Tool

    Time: 3:00 pm–5:00 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Louis DePasquale, PT, MA

    Level: Multiple Level

    Fall risk has been identified as an urgent public health problem. Annual fall risk screening for the rapidly changing older adult (+65) demographic is now mandated by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services and recommended by the AGS. Evidence for the development of new and more challenging balance measures capable of early identification of fall risk in the active older adult is overwhelming. A possible link between adaptability to externally imposed perturbations and future fall risk in community-living older adults exists. There is a new, valid and reliable clinical perturbation fall risk assessment method for active community-dwelling older adults.

    This course will review topics including the repeated incremental predictable perturbations (RIPPS) balance method, the literature highlighting the urgent public health problem of fall risk in the older adult, the limitations of and the need for development of new and more challenging balance measures for active older adults, and perspectives on nonclinical perturbation research and evidence supporting the clinical use of predictable perturbations for identification of fall risk in active community-living older adults. The speaker will present the repeated incremental predictable perturbation (RIPPS) protocol, including: administration sequence, performance criteria, percentage of total body weight direction stepping limit scores, test end points, clinical performance measures, 10% total body weight significance and stepping responses, directional stepping limit responses, and test interpretations. Follow up discussion will address perturbation neurophysiology, motor skill retention, induced-stepping treatment applications, and case illustrations.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Identify the repeated incremental predictable perturbation protocol end points.
    • Administer the repeated incremental predictable perturbation protocol.
    • Interpret scores for fall risk classification.
    • Develop and apply perturbation training strategies.
    • Document objective measurements.

    Vertical Orientation in Older Adults: Evaluation and Intervention

    Time: 3:00 pm–5:00 pm (See Program for Room)

    Level: Basic

    This is a joint program. See full description at Home Health programming.

    Wednesday, January 23

    Early Fall-Risk Assessment for Community-Dwelling Older Adults

    Time: 8:00 am–10:00 am (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Mindy Renfro, PT, DPT, PhD, GCS, CPH; Brady Whetten, PT, DPT

    Level: Intermediate

    Fall risk is multifactorial. Many individual professions have come up with fall-risk assessments to target specific fall-risk factors. While these 1-dimensional screens may be effective in identifying a subset of fallers, it is simply not enough to adequately capture all individuals who are at risk for falls. There is an increasing demand for a single tool that captures a multifactorial approach to assess the whole person and his or her level of safety in the community. The Fall Risk Assessment & Screening Tool (FRAST) and the STEADI (Stopping Elderly Accidents, Deaths, and Injuries) were designed to provide a comprehensive tool that incorporates a multitude of potential risk factors to identify individuals who may be at risk for falls. These tools are designed to be implemented easily in the primary care or public health setting. The questionnaire and screening can be completed by a minimally trained office staff member and subsequently be interpreted by a primary care provider (PCP). The tool includes recommended interventions based on specific deficits identified by the screening, and an appropriate plan can be formulated with the patient.

    While relatively new, the FRAST and the STEADI provide an easy and exciting option for the health care system to alleviate some of the enormous burden placed on the system from falls. This presentation will introduce these valuable screening tools and discuss implementation into the community. This presentation will guide attendees through the process of contacting the primary care clinic, providing training and implementation of the system in the community. Case studies will be presented.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Recognize a theoretical framework for the necessity of a comprehensive fall-risk assessment tool.
    • Become familiar with the FRAST and STEADI and their potential benefit to the health care system.
    • Identify ideas for successful implementation of these tools within their community.
    • Discuss strategies for ways to motivate participants in the primary care setting to move forward with this tool.
    • Briefly discuss treatment options for those identified to be at risk for falls.

    I Want to Start Teaching in the Classroom: What's Next? Part 1

    Time: 8:00 am–10:00 am (See Program for Room)

    Level: Basic

    This is a joint program. See full description at Education programming.

    Fitness Screening for Senior Games Athletes

    Joint Program: Education

    Time: 11:00 am–1:00 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Becca Jordre, PT, DPT; Adam Ladwig, SPT; Kate Beacom, SPT; Vashti Graphenteen, SPT

    Level: Basic

    The National Senior Games Association (NSGA) regularly holds events for individuals over the age of 50 at both the state and national level. NSGA's main aim is to promote health and fitness for older adults. As physical therapists, our vision and goals could not be more appropriately aligned with this organization. The athletes involved in NSGA are eager to maintain their health and mobility as they age. With this motivation, physical therapists have a perfect opportunity to identify impairments and training errors, provide education, and refer participants to appropriate providers. In doing so, we may keep our healthy older athletes in the game. This session will present the Senior Athlete Fitness Exam (SAFE), an evidence-based fitness screen with an emphasis on cardiovascular risk factors, strength, flexibility, and balance. It is currently being conducted at both the state and national level through a formal agreement with the NSGA, the National Center for Senior Health and Fitness, and the University of South Dakota. Information will be provided on the screen's creation, implementation, and interpretation with evidence to support each component.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Report increased awareness of the NSGA, its goals, and organizational structure.
    • Discuss the benefits and importance of physical therapist involvement in NSGA events.
    • List the components of SAFE and discuss why they were chosen for inclusion.
    • Identify the steps needed to bring SAFE to their state NSGA events.
    • Describe the process of ongoing research associated with SAFE and how you may become involved.

    I Want to Start Teaching in the Classroom: What's Next? Part 2

    Joint Program: Cardiovascular and Pulmonary

    Time: 11:00 am–1:00 pm (See Program for Room)

    Level: Basic

    This is a joint program. See full description at Education programming.

    Let's Get More Hip

    Time: 11:00 am–1:00 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Tiffany N. Hilton, PT, MPT; PhD, Jeff Houck, PT, PhD; David R. Sinacore, PhD; Helen Host, PT, PhD; Linda M. Riek, PT, DPT, PhD

    Level: Multiple Level

    Current approaches to hip fracture rehabilitation do not return patients to baseline functional levels, increasing the prevalence of frailty in these patients. This may be a direct result of rehabilitation management that focuses on teaching compensatory techniques/strategies as opposed to restoring involved lower extremity function. This session will explore results from current research on prognostic factors (clinical exam measures and laboratory based biomechanical measures) that identify which patients are more likely to benefit from high-intensity exercise. The evidence supporting high- intensity training targeting the involved limb, rather than compensations of the uninvolved limb, will be discussed. There will be an emphasis on integrating exercise training for the amelioration of physical frailty in elderly patients after hip fracture. Specific case studies that include both established clinical tests and biomechanical measures will be included.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Describe epidemiology of hip fractures and discuss factors that influence patient outcomes.
    • Discuss the value of outcomes used to assess hip fracture in the clinic.
    • Discuss the following related to restorative care programs: evidence supporting high-intensity restorative programs; exercise training for the amelioration of physical frailty after hip fracture; barriers to implementing long term restorative care programs; and current evidence for the ideal patient for restorative programs.
    • Review case studies of clinical and biomechanical variables of patients posthip fracture.

    Are You a Frustrated SNF Therapist? What You Can Do to Influence Change

    Time: 3:00 pm–5:00 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Ellen Strunk, PT, MS, GCS, CEEAA; Missy Criss, PT, MS, GCS

    Level: Intermediate

    Do you currently practice in a skilled nursing facility (SNF)? Are you thinking about a accepting a new opportunity to practice in one? The SNF is an extremely challenging and yet very rewarding practice setting. All of your clinical management and examination skills are challenged including differential diagnosis, patient management, communication, and team building. In the past several years, however, SNF therapists have been faced with adapting to a constantly and rapidly changing regulatory and reimbursement world in addition to the challenges of working with an increasingly acute and frail patient population. Have you been able to keep up with the changes? How have you coped? How do you embody the vision of 2020? Do you have opportunities to demonstrate autonomous practice, evidence-based practice, and professionalism every day? This course will provide an opportunity for PTs and PTAs to come together to learn about the most recent changes, discuss how they have affected physical therapy practice, and share ideas about how to maintain the standard of care all PTs and PTAs strive for.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Identify the most recent regulatory and reimbursement challenges (for both short-term and long-term patients) that have a direct impact on the practice of physical therapy in the SNF setting.
    • Use strategies to more effectively cope and manage the practice of physical therapy within the SNF setting.
    • Recognize the challenges that are on the horizon for physical therapy and the responsibility each individual therapist has to model best practice.

    Clinical Practice Recommendation for Service Dogs in the Veterans' Administration System of Care

    Time: 3:00 pm–5:00 pm (See Program for Room)

    Level: Intermediate

    This is a joint program. See full description at Federal Physical Therapy programming.

    The "D" in Dementia Is Not for Discharge

    Time: 3:00 pm–5:00 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Rania Karim, PT, DPT, GCS

    Level: Basic

    The diagnosis of dementia is a known risk factor for function status decline and disability. Persons with dementia (PWDs) experiencing difficulty performing functional activities are often referred to physical therapy. However, it is the presenter's belief that therapeutic nihilism exists among some therapist. For PWDs, therapeutic nihilism negatively impacts them when the therapists regard behaviors as inevitable, not amendable to intervention, and use the diagnosis of dementia as a reason for discharge. There is evidence that despite memory impairments, PWDs are able to learn. Current physical therapy recommendations for motor learning involve tasks that are not used in physical therapy, such as rotary-pursuit or bean-bag toss. Additionally, existing physical therapy recommendations may not be practical to implement due to time constraints and the nature of the task.

    The presenter will discuss the evaluation and treatment of PWDs reinforcing literature that supports PWDs are able to learn. Therapists also will be introduced to a treatment strategy called spaced retrieval—a memory augmentation technique that uses verbal cues and positive reinforcement to help improve the recall of information learned. Providing therapists with an additional tool may help to eliminate therapeutic nihilism and, in turn, improve the care of PWDs.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Describe impairments found in individuals with dementia.
    • Discuss the evaluation of persons with dementia.
    • Apply the spaced retrieval technique to physical therapy practice.
    • Discuss the feasibility study implementation of the spaced retrieval technique by caregivers.

    Enhancing Professional Development Through ABPTS Certification

    Time: 3:00 pm–5:00 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: John D. Lowman, PT, PhD, CCS; Derek D. Stepp

    Level: Basic

    The APTA specialist certification program can open up new doors for you as a professional. By becoming a board-certified clinical specialist, you can gain the formal recognition you deserve for your knowledge, experience, and skills. This forum is open to all individuals who wish to learn more about the specialist certification program, including eligibility requirements and the professional and personal benefits of becoming a board-certified clinical specialist. Following a brief overview of the specialist certification program, you will have an opportunity to speak with members of ABPTS and the specialty councils and to get answers to your questions about the certification process.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Recognize the specialist certification program and process.
    • Describe the minimum eligibility requirements for specialist certification.
    • List the current areas of specialty practice.
    • Describe the role of clinical residencies in the certification process.
    • Identify top motivations to pursue specialist certification.

    Student Forum: Clinical Collaboration Among PTs and PTAs

    Joint Program: Education

    Time: 3:00 pm–5:00 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Susan L. Wenker, PT, MS, GCS; Angie McConkey, PTA, MS

    Level: Basic

    The role of PTs/PTAs is dynamic and variable. Multiple factors may impact a facility employing a PTA and additional factors will impact the ability of the PT and PTA to work collaboratively in the clinical setting. This 2-hour session will provide an opportunity for knowledge sharing along with current positions of APTA on the role of the PT and PTA as they collaborate in the clinical environment.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • State the differences between state regulations and APTA positions and guidelines.
    • Recognize the evidence used in problem solving the role of the PT and PTA in patient care cases.
    • Access information via APTA's website to make informed decisions.

    Thursday, January 24

    Exercise Prescription: Are You Pushing Aging Adults Hard Enough?

    Joint Program: Home Health

    Time: 8:00 am–10:00 am (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Marilyn Moffat, PT, DPT, PhD, DSc (Hon), FAPTA, CSCS, CEEAA; Karen Kemmus, PT, DPT

    Level: Multiple Level

    Based on 2011 Census Bureau reports, the Baby Boomers started turning 65 and the number of aging adults will increase dramatically in the next 2 decades. The number of aging adults with functional limitations, disabilities, and participation restrictions will affect physical therapy practice. Exercise is the single most effective intervention PTs can use to positively impact these changes in the aging patient/client. With more aging adults seeking physical therapy services, it will become imperative to maximize the results of physical therapy interventions and capitalize upon the opportunities presented.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Select and apply functional tests and measures in the areas of aerobic capacity/endurance, gait, balance, and strength for aging adults.
    • Describe the application of exercise theory and prescription to patient/client management.
    • Increase awareness of data related to exercise prescription, particularly intensity.
    • Analyze mode, intensity, frequency, and duration for evidence-based exercise intervention programs for those with selected cardiovascular, musculoskeletal, and neuromuscular system involvement.
    • Enhance practice through increased awareness of the need to push patients/clients harder through appropriate exercise.

    Maximizing Your Plan of Care: Aquatic Therapy After Total Joint Replacement Surgery

    Time: 8:00 am–10:00 am (See Program for Room)

    Level: Intermediate

    Patient-Centered Care: Bringing Quality Toward End of Life

    Time: 8:00 am–10:00 am (See Program for Room)

    Level: Multiple Level

    This is a joint program. See full description at Home Health programming.

    This is a joint program. See full description at Aquatic Physical Therapy programming.

    Polypharmacy Using Case Studies: Clinical Practice Implications

    Time: 11:00 am–1:00 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Suzanne L. Tinsley, PT, PhD; Marie Vazquez-Morgan, PT, PhD

    Level: Advanced

    Many patients being referred to physical therapy are taking multiple prescriptions and/or over-the-counter medications. Although many of these medications are directly related to their rehabilitation diagnosis, some may not be. This may be due to the larger number of coexisting pathophysiologies in our patient population, especially the elderly. Drug-associated adverse events range from 5%-35% in the older adult. What should you know about clinical pharmacology to manage them effectively? As the physical therapy profession progresses toward independent practice, physical therapists must increase their understanding of how drug therapy and nutritional components can impact functional outcomes. By having a comprehensive understanding of adverse drug effects, the physical therapist will be able to make changes in the rehabilitation program and recognize the need for referrals and/or rehabilitation team conferences. As a continuation of the presentation at CSM 2012, this session will use case studies only (based on the International Classification of Function, Health, and Disability [ICF] model) to address changes that may be present in patient populations we treat as a result of adverse drug reactions due to polypharmacy.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Review the primary pharmacokinetic factors involved in drug therapy (drug administration, absorption, distribution, interaction, and elimination) through case study examples.
    • Explain, using case studies, how altered pharmacokinetics may lead to a decrease or an increase in drug effects, and how these effects may be recognized in geriatric patients/clients receiving physical therapy.
    • Identify, using case studies, the general categories, mechanisms of action, risk-benefit ratio, and implications on rehabilitative interventions for the pharmacological agents routinely prescribed for conditions involving the cardiovascular, neuromuscular, endocrine, pulmonary, and central nervous systems in the geriatric population.
    • Identify, using case studies, the possible effects of polypharmacy and various drug interactions on the effectiveness of rehabilitative interventions and functional outcomes in the geriatric patient/client.

    Health Promotion and Wellness SIG Programming: Evidence-based Health Promotion and Practice

    Time: 3:00 pm–5:00 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Lori Schrodt, PT, MS, PhD; Tiffany Shubert, PT, MPT, PhD; Alice Bell, PT, DPT, GCS; Jennifer Sidelinker, PT, GCS; Jennifer Martin, PT, DPT, MS; Gail Huber, PT, PhD, MHPE

    Level: Basic

    Clinical trials strongly support that larger doses of therapy delivered over longer durations results in better outcomes. However, reimbursement models are based on fewer visits and shorter durations, making integration of evidence into practice challenging. Evidence-based health promotion and best-practice programs are designed for straightforward implementation of effective exercise programs and health behavior strategies, while maximizing health care and community resources. These programs target management of health conditions (eg, arthritis, fall prevention), incorporate quality control through program design, and can be an efficient and inexpensive way to augment total exercise dose. Currently, no guidelines or standard models exist for physical therapists to implement these programs into clinical practice. The purpose of this course is to provide clinicians with a series of models demonstrating integration of these programs into geriatric clinical practice. Physical therapists who are currently incorporating evidence-based programs into home health, skilled nursing, rehabilitation, and outpatient settings will present and discuss their experiences.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Discuss evidence-based and best-practice programs to augment physical therapy.
    • Discuss the implementation and outcomes of the "Otago Exercise Program" as the home exercise program of choice in the home health setting.
    • Discuss the implementation and outcomes of "Balance in Action," a program designed to standardize falls risk assessment and intervention in skilled nursing, assisted living, and rehabilitation facilities.
    • Discuss the implementation and outcomes of "Fit and Strong," a program designed for older adults with arthritis to safely exercise in outpatient settings.
    • Discuss implementation and outcomes of "Enhanced Fitness," a program designed to increase physical activity and fitness in older adults in outpatient settings.
    • Develop an action plan to incorporate evidence-based health promotion and best-practice programs into physical therapy practice.
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