Archive: CSM 2013: Research Programming

  • This is archived programming for CSM 2013. See current programming.

    Browse Research sessions by day. Return to the main topic menu 

    Tuesday, January 22 | Wednesday, January 23 | Thursday, January 24 

    * Should you choose to preselect regular (not preconference) Tuesday-Thursday sessions during the registration process, please be advised that preselection is not a guarantee of a seat. Attendees are asked to preselect to better determine room size and all efforts will be made to accommodate sessions in the largest rooms possible. All attendees are encouraged to show up to sessions early. Attendees are also encouraged to select alternative sessions in the event their first choice is full. 

    Tuesday, January 22

    Facing Into the Storm: Challenging PTs to Thrive in a Changing Health Care Environment

    Joint Program: Health Policy and Administration

    Time: 8:00 am–10:00 am (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: David Scalzitti, PT, PhD, OCS; Elizabeth Rasch, PT, PhD; Jennifer Rowland, PT, PhD, MPH; Alan Jette, PT, PhD; Suzanne McDonough, PhD, HDipAcupuncture, BPhsio

    Level: Basic

    This panel presentation will provide an overview of the issues relative to the health of the population that PTs serve and the importance of health services research within the field of physical therapy. This will be followed by examples of the application of public health and health services approaches to physical therapy from national and international perspectives.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Based on national data, describe the health and health disparities of people with disabilities and chronic conditions using common health indicators.
    • Describe challenges involved in health care delivery and access to health care for people with disabilities and chronic conditions.
    • Indicate the importance of physical therapists' roles in health promotion and health services research.
    • Provide examples of how physical therapy and public health can interface using national and international examples.

    PhD Program Director's Dialogue

    Time: 8:00 am–10:00 am (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Paula M. Ludewig, PhD, Carole A. Tucker, PT, PhD, PCS, RCEP

    Level: Advanced

    Academic doctoral education is a fundamental component for advancement of the physical therapy profession. Many institutions offer PhD programs for preparation of independent researchers, in addition to entry-level physical therapy education. Currently, however, there is no established network for communication and cooperation among PhD education programs. This session will provide background on the characteristics of existing PhD programs that are served by PT graduate faculty and consistently enroll physical therapists. The presenters will discuss common challenges in recruitment of top students, provision of a curriculum that promotes the formation of scholars and researchers, and funding of students. Desired outcomes of graduates and interest in establishing a network for PhD program directors will be further considered. The session format will include presentation by multiple speakers, as well as a group discussion.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Identify the range of program characteristics for existing programs offering PhD education to physical therapists.
    • Assess the common needs and challenges of preparing doctoral students and the formation of scholars.
    • Recognize opportunities for collaboration among existing programs.
    • Determine if there is a need and support for a knowledge network among existing programs.

    Gait Retraining: Taking the Next Step Forward in Rehabilitation

    Joint Program: Neurology

    Time: 11:00 am–1:00 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Brian Noehren, PT, PhD; Irene S. Davis, PT, PhD, FACSM, FASB, FAPTA; Amy Bastian, PT, PhD; Joaquin Barrios, PT, DPT, PhD

    Level: Basic

    The correction of altered walking and running mechanics through the use of gait retraining is a common treatment modality across a variety of patient populations. Gait retraining involves providing visual, verbal, or tactile feedback with the purpose of facilitating an improvement in individuals gait mechanics. Despite divergent treatment populations, there are commonalities to the approach taken to retrain individual’s gait that can be applied by a clinician to their own practice. The purpose of this 2-hour session is to provide clinicians with the guiding principles of gait retraining that can be applied to diverse populations, including how to use gait retraining to address the underlying altered movement mechanics in populations ranging from those with neurologic impairments to runners with patellofemoral pain syndrome. While the populations and mode of delivery may vary, there are commonalities in the use of gait retraining that will be identified. The speakers will highlight the effect of altered gait patterns on outcome measures and quality of life and discuss how to incorporate research on gait retraining into everyday clinical practice. Attendees will gain valuable insights into evidence-based approaches to facilitate improved gait patterns in clinical practice.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Identify the evidence for the use of gait retraining in clinical practice.
    • Explain how the effect of feedback type, frequency, and duration influence the adaptation to a new gait pattern.
    • Select patients who would be most appropriate for gait retraining.
    • Appreciate the progression of gait retraining from initial practice into incorporation into daily life.
    • Recognize the common threads of applying an effective gait retraining program that can be applied to various populations.

    Promoting the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning in Physical Therapy

    Time: 11:00 am–1:00 pm (See Program for Room)

    Level: Intermediate

    This is a joint program. See full description at Education programming.

    America's Next Top Model Journal Club: Tools to Help You Run a Journal Club Next Week

    Time: 3:00 pm–5:00 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Lisa Selby-Silverstein, PT, PhD, NCS; Julie K. Tilson, PT, DPT, MS, NCS; Hilary Greenberger, PT, PhD, OCS; Traci Norris, PT, DPT, GCS; Randy R. Richter, PT, PhD

    Level: Multiple Level

    This hands-on program will equip clinicians with tools to prepare, present, and determine the feasibility of clinical practice changes using a journal club format. The presenters will model an evidence-based journal club that promotes knowledge translation from research to clinical action. A database search using various search engines such as PubMed, TRIP, and PEDro will be modeled, applying search strategies using Boolean and MeSH terms. Clinicians will learn how to obtain full-text articles. The speakers will briefly summarize selected articles and present ratings of each study's validity. Audience members will then participate in a discussion about whether the literature supports a change in clinical behavior, what that change might look like, how clinical changes might be documented, and how to measure the clinical effectiveness of those changes. Attendees will also assist presenters in developing a clinical bottom-line statement that includes a graded recommendation for clinical action. After the journal club model the audience will be invited to discuss successes and challenges for implementing this and other journal club models.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Implement an evidence-based model journal club upon return to your clinical practice.
    • Apply strategies for searching a clinical question using databases such as PubMed, TRIP, and PEDro.
    • Integrate the results of several articles into a single clinical bottom line, including a graded recommendation, for measurable change in your facility's clinical practice.
    • Identify ways to measure change in practice and patient outcomes driven by a facility's journal club.

    Developing an Orthopedic Research Agenda for Early Investigators

    Time: 3:00 pm–5:00 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Joseph A. Zeni, PT, PhD; David Logerstedt, PT, MPT, PhD; Gregory E. Hicks, PT, PhD; Lynn Snyder-Mackler, PT, ScD, SCS, ATC; Kristin Archer, PT, DPT

    Level: Intermediate

    In this session, attendees will learn how to develop a significant and innovative orthopedic research agenda using a variety of research paradigms. Discussion will include developing a meaningful and impactful research question that has funding potential; seeking private and public funding sources; developing and testing novel, clinically significant research questions in the orthopedic field; transitioning to independence; and finding a strong research mentor. The speakers will address key issues that orthopedic researchers face in building their research careers and provide insight into research approaches that may be favorable to funding agencies. Presentations and discussions will address mechanisms for finding or building a culture that supports research for new and early investigators.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Develop a meaningful and impactful research question that has funding potential.
    • Discuss a variety of research methodologies, including epidemiological studies, clinical trials, and observational research studies.
    • Identify different funding sources that match your research design and methodology.
    • Navigate the transition from clinician and student to independent investigator.
    • Identify a strong research mentor.

    Prosthetic Advances: Evidence and Experience in the Care of Injured Service Members

    Time: 3:00 pm–5:00 pm (See Program for Room)

    Level: Multiple Level

    This is a joint program. See full description at Federal Physical Therapy programming.

    Qualitative Methods: Everything You Want to Know But Were Unsure Whom to Ask

    Joint Program: Education

    Time: 3:00 pm–5:00 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Sarah H. Kagan, PhD; Gail Towsley, PhD; Susan Lysaght, MSN; Kamila Alexander, MPH

    Level: Intermediate

    In this interactive session, a team of investigators will provide a succinct and focused overview of some of the most commonly used qualitative research methods applicable to clinical research. The methods covered will include qualitative description and content analysis, ethnographic approaches, narrative analysis, and grounded theory and interactionist perspectives. Each methodological tradition will be explored from several dimensions, such as philosophy and paradigmatic assumptions, methodological utility and aims, approach and design, data collection and management, analytic techniques, and findings presentation. Qualitative descriptive approaches and content analysis are presented to avoid common pitfalls, such as "no name" qualitative reporting in which qualitative description or content analysis is assumed but not stated. Ethnographic methods can be used to address clinically focused questions in organizational and other settings relevant to physical therapist practice. Narrative analysis can offer benefits in investigations that seek to understand patient stories and interactions with providers. Consideration of narrative analysis delivers opportunities to discern the value of interpretive as opposed to descriptive methods.

    The speakers will address grounded theory and interactionist methods to explore the advantages of interpretive approaches and the rationale for theory-producing techniques. The session will use questions and examples to foster attendee exchange about experiences with qualitative research, challenges and questions in their use, and access to resources for the design, conduct, and dissemination of qualitative studies. The presenters also will detail expectations for reporting qualitative research—including COREQ reporting guidelines—and offer specific resources for audience members posing questions about particular projects.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Identify appropriate use of qualitative research methods.
    • Discuss the utility of qualitative description and content analysis.
    • Discuss the utility of select ethnographic methods.
    • Discuss the utility of narrative analysis.
    • Discuss the utility of grounded theory and other interactionist methods.
    • List elements of well-reported qualitative research.

    Writing With the Editors

    Time: 3:00 pm–5:00 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Rebecca Craik, PT, PhD, FAPTA; Chris G. Maher, PhD; Steven Z. George, PT, PhD; Terese Chmielewski, PT, PhD; Darcy Reisman, PT, PhD; Kathleen Gill-Body, PT, DPT, NCS; Riddle Daniel, PT, PhD, FAPTA

    Level: Multiple Level

    You’ve heard of "Dancing With the Stars"; now it’s time for "Writing With the Editors." PTJ's Editorial Board members know publication inside and out—both as editors and as authors who've had their own share of accepts and rejections. Take advantage of their collective wisdom! During the first half of this session, Foundation for Physical Therapy PODS I/II recipients Chmielewski and Reisman will quiz the editors about everything you need to know, including trial registration, study participant flowcharts, data analysis, and informed consent. During the second half, you'll break into small groups, each including an editor, with interactions geared for authors who plan to submit a paper to a journal or who have questions broad or specific about writing, submitting, and revising.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Identify when it is appropriate to communicate with editors prior to submission.
    • Describe the steps involved in the review of reports of clinical trials.
    • Explain how standardized checklists and flow diagrams help both authors and reviewers.
    • List the elements of a successful Introduction and Discussion.
    • Keep your manuscript within the required page limit while also expressing your thoughts completely.

    Wednesday, January 23

    Genomics, Part 1—Linking Molecules and Genes to Clinical Practice: A Closer Look at the Spine

    Time: 8:00 am–10:00 am (See Program for Room)

    Level: Basic

    This is a joint program. See full description at Neurology programming.

    Oncology Section EDGE Task Force on Breast Cancer Outcomes: Clinical Measures of Pain, Fatigue, and Lymphedema in Individuals Treated for Breast Cancer

    Time: 8:00 am–10:00 am (See Program for Room)

    Level: Intermediate

    This is a joint program. See full description at Oncology programming.

    Finding Evidence: Hooked on Evidence Computer Lab

    Time: 11:00 am–1:00 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: David Scalzitti, PT, PhD, OCS

    Level: Intermediate

    APTA's Hooked on Evidence is one of the premier resources specific for evidence-based physical therapist practice. The database allows you to rapidly locate extractions of research articles related to physical therapy interventions. These extractions provide you with information related to the study design, participants, interventions, and outcomes for use in practice. This session will highlight efficient use of Hooked on Evidence, including its complementary nature to other APTA resources.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Use Hooked on Evidence to search for evidence in practice.
    • Use patient clinical scenarios to locate and evaluate evidence.
    • Assess measures of treatment effect size to locate evidence of effectiveness.

    Genomics, Part 2—Linking Molecules and Genes to Clinical Practice: A Closer Look at the Spine

    Time: 11:00 am–1:00 pm (See Program for Room)

    Level: Basic

    This is a joint program. See full description at Neurology programming.

    Write a Cochrane Review and Have Far-Reaching Impact

    Time: 11:00 am–1:00 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Rachelle Buchbinder, PhD

    Level: Intermediate

    Cochrane reviews are considered the "gold standard" of systematic reviews. They aim to synthesize evidence about the effectiveness of interventions and utility of diagnostic tests to inform clinical and policy decisions. More physical therapists need to be writing Cochrane reviews on topics important to their practice! Find out the basics of reading and applying Cochrane reviews—and the basics of performing a Cochrane review—from an expert who knows Cochrane from both sides, as a reviewer and as an author. Workshop leader is Rachelle Buchbinder, joint coordinating editor of the Cochrane Musculoskeletal Group, author of numerous Cochrane and other systematic reviews, and a PTJ Editorial Board member. An interactive presentation using a new topic or existing review will show you "how to do it."

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Identify gaps that exist in coverage of physical therapy in the Cochrane Systematic Review Database.
    • List the Cochrane review submission requirements.
    • Describe the peer-review process used for Cochrane systematic reviews.
    • Explain how to avoid some of the most common obstacles to conducting a successful review.
    • Take full advantage of Cochrane online training resources.

    Ask-a-Librarian: Improve Your Searching in 2 Hours or Less

    Time: 3:00 pm–5:00 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Gini Blodgett, MSLS

    Level: Intermediate

    Finding the research you need for the clinical services you provide can be frustrating and time consuming. Let APTA's information specialist walk you through resources and searching techniques that can help you find the literature you need. Using databases from APTA's Open Door portal, PubMed, Hooked on Evidence, PTNow, and PEDro, this session will cover selecting the correct resource, incorporating Boolean connectors in your search, crafting a research question into a search query using the P-I-C-O method, selecting between keyword or subject searching, and refining or broadening search results. Participants should have basic experience with web or database searching, but even searchers with an extensive searching background will come away with new knowledge and techniques.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Select the appropriate database or information source for your research needs and implement its features.
    • Identify key concepts.
    • Combine terms in a search string free style, as well as in a structured P-I-C-O format.
    • Create search strings using Boolean logic (AND, OR, NOT) and nesting ( ).
    • Take advantage of controlled vocabularies by using keywords and subject terms in your searches.
    • Search, examine results, and revise searches.

    The "Business" of Research and Negotiating Your Faculty Position

    Time: 3:00 pm–5:00 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Samuel C. Lee, PT, PhD; Steven Z. George, PT, PhD; Stuart A. Binder-Macleod, PT, PhD; Terese Chmielewski, PT, PhD; Michael D. Lewek, PT, PhD; Noelle Moreau, PT, PhD; Laura Prosser, PT, PhD

    Level: Intermediate

    A growing number of physical therapists are pursuing advanced degrees to move our profession closer to its Vision 2020 goals. Whether you are a PhD (or equivalent) or a DPT (or seasoned PT clinician) with an academic position, you are continually challenged to participate in activities other than those in your research agenda, including service, teaching, and scholarship. Tenure and promotion decisions are often contingent on research and scholarship; however, due to faculty obligations, early physical therapy investigators often struggle with finding time to write dissertation papers, set-up a laboratories, and apply for grants. Approaching research as a business may be a useful strategy for the new investigator researcher.

    This session will give guidelines for organizing your research and academic interests in the framework of "business." In this approach, you define goals and strategic plans to organize yourself to meet various demands and expectations of the "business" and reduce frustrations. Having and communicating defined goals and visions with a potential employer helps enable the employer and the interviewee determine if they are a good "fit." This session will provide guidelines for reasonable and effective negotiation for obtaining your needs.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Discuss the importance of developing a strategic plan to facilitate success in a research career.
    • Define personal goals upon which to base a strategic plan.
    • Develop a strategic plan.
    • Define strategies for implementing a strategic plan.
    • Define components of negotiating your academic position.

    Clinical and Basic Science of Muscle Fatty Infiltration

    Time: 3:00 pm–5:00 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Samuel Ward, PT, PhD; Richard Lieber, PhD

    Level: Intermediate

    This session will focus on fatty infiltration of muscle that occurs after injury or altered use, laying the foundation for thoughtful discussion of treatment for these injuries. The presenters will describe conditions such as rotator cuff injury, low back pain and denervation, along with imaging studies of affected muscles. They then will discuss the basic science of fatty infiltration, with special reference to muscle stem cells and cell fate determination.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Describe conditions under which fatty infiltration occurs.
    • Distinguish among the terms "fatty atrophy," "fatty infiltration," and "fatty degeneration" related to tissue components.
    • Name the major stem cell populations in skeletal muscle.
    • Describe how muscle stem cells may be involved in fatty infiltration.

    Thursday, January 24

    Classifying Evidence: Putting the Horse in Front of the Cart

    Joint Program: Education

    Time: 8:00 am–10:00 am (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Jeffrey R. Hebert, PT, PhD; Randy R. Richter, PT, PhD

    Level: Multiple Level

    Evidence-based practice (EBP) is an essential part of quality physical therapist provided patient care. Common barriers to EBP include lack of time, limited searching and appraisal skills, and difficulty applying the findings to clinical care. What are not clear at this time are the best approaches to enhance EBP implementation for the clinician and student. The speakers' will present a modified version of the Oxford Center for Evidence-Based Medicine (CEBM) Level of Evidence 2 classification system, which includes 2 additional clinical query categories: patient/provider beliefs (qualitative research) and cost/economic issues. Additionally, decision trees will be presented that link the various clinical queries to corresponding study designs and typically reported statistics. Having a solid understanding of what study design(s) and subsequent statistic(s) are related to each of the clinical query categories prior to active searching will lead to more efficient searches and quicker determination of which retrieved article(s) are best to proceed to the critical appraisal process.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Recognize the barriers to conducting EBP and the conceptual framework of a new, classification system for EBP that attempts to lesson these limitations.
    • Identify what study designs and statistics are associated with what specific type of clinical query, including prognosis, diagnosis, therapy, patient/provider beliefs, and cost/economic issues.
    • Apply the classification system for EBP to different types of patients and clinical queries, promoting quicker EBP-related decision-making in areas of searching, article selection and appraisal, and accurate level of evidence classification.

    Enhancing Educational Research: Advice From the Journal of Physical Therapy Education (JOPTE) Editorial Board

    Time: 8:00 am–10:00 am (See Program for Room)

    Level: Multiple Level

    This is a joint program. See full description at Education programming.

    PTNow.org: Writing and Reviewing Clinical Summaries

    Time: 8:00 am–10:00 am (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Kathleen Kline Mangione, PT, PhD, GCS; Judith Deutsch, PT, PhD, FAPTA; Karen L. McCulloch, PT, PhD, NCS; Sally Westcott McCoy, PT, PhD; Jan Reynolds

    Level: Intermediate

    Do you want to be a writer or a reviewer who influences patient care? Translating evidence for application to practice is a specialized skill, and it can have a big impact on patient care. PTNow.org is a web portal designed to make it easy for clinicians to use evidence, and, in this session, PTNow editorial team members will share their expertise and experience in writing and reviewing. The session will focus on PTNow's clinical summaries, which contain the latest evidence on classification, screening, examination, diagnosis, prognosis, and intervention in the management of specific conditions in specific types of patients. Clinical summaries aren't just words strung on a page—they come alive with demonstration videos, links to actual tests, and discussion forums. During the first half of this session, attendees will tour PTNow.org and explore how evidence is being translated on PTNow.org. During the second half of the session, attendees will break into smaller groups led by PTNow editors, authors, and reviewers to discuss writing strategies, unique approaches to peer review, strategies for updates, and suggestions for future directions.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Discuss some key strategies that have been shown to be successful in implementing evidence in practice in other professions.
    • Describe the structure of the PTNow clinical summary.
    • Explain how external resources are identified and vetted to enhance the value of clinical summaries.
    • Demonstrate how to provide constructive reviewer feedback.
    • Identify weaknesses in clinical summary submissions that slow down the review process and reduce chances of success.

    Research Funding Symposium

    Time: 11:00 am–1:00 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Vince Campbell, PhD; Daofen Chen, PhD; Patricia Dorn, PhD; Christine Goertz, D.C., PhD; Lyndon Joseph, PhD; Ralph Nitkin, PhD; Mary Rodgers, PT, PhD, FAPTA; David Scalzitti, PT, PhD, OCS; Harvey Schwartz, PhD, MBA; Ralph Nitkin, PhD

    Level: Multiple Level

    This symposium will provide an overview of several federal agencies, institutes, and centers that support funding for rehabilitation research. The speakers will discuss information on extramural research programs, current research interests and initiatives, and opportunities for training and career development. A panel discussion will include representatives from the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI), the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ), the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA), the National Center for Medical Rehabilitation Research (NCMRR), the National Institute on Aging (NIA), the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS), and National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (NIBIB). An opportunity for one-on-one discussions also will be available.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Identify research areas supported by these agencies, institutes, and centers.
    • Recognize current funding initiatives relevant to exercise, physical function, aging, rehabilitation, and technology.
    • Discuss opportunities for research training and career development.

    Tips for Developing Mixed-Methods Research

    Joint Program: Education

    Time: 11:00 am–1:00 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Patricia Q. McGinnis, PT, PhD; Therese E. Johnston, PT, PhD, MBA; Susan F. Wainwright, PT, PhD; Anita Santasier, PT, PhD, OCS

    Level: Multiple Level

    Blended research methods can more fully answer questions posed by rehabilitation researchers. Historically, researchers have commonly addressed their questions through the use of quantitative analyses alone; however, qualitative techniques—such as interview, field observation, and artifact analysis—can offer additional perspectives to more fully inform research in the health sciences. Mixed-methods design research combines quantitative and qualitative approaches to gain a more overall understanding of the issue. Recently, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) convened a group to develop guidelines for the use of these research methods titled, Best Practices for Mixed Methods Research in the Health Sciences. These newly published recommendations provide researchers with valuable resources for developing mixed-methods design research, and will form the basis for the content of this presentation. This interactive session is designed for 2 groups of researchers: (1) early career researchers looking to expand their knowledge of research methodologies to enhance their quantitative research plans, and (2) experienced qualitative or quantitative researchers who want to learn how to combine approaches to best inform their research inquiry. Attendees will be encouraged to share their questions, challenges, and experiences during the panel discussion.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Discuss the value of mixed-methods research designs in physical therapy.
    • Highlight the unique contributions of quantitative and qualitative methods as part of a mixed-methods research design.
    • Describe the resources and training needed to implement mixed-methods research designs.
    • Interpret criteria used by reviewers to evaluate mixed-method research proposals.

    Eugene Michels Research Forum—Lost in Translation: Implementation of Research Findings in Today's World of Clinical Reality

    Time: 3:00 pm–5:00 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Catherine E. Lang, PT, PhD; Steven Wolf, PT, PhD; Deborah Backus, PT, PhD; Joseph Schreiber, PT, PhD, PCS; Rachel Tappan, PT, MPT

    Level: Multiple Level

    The goal of this educational session is to present the facilitators and barriers to implementation of evidence-based interventions derived from basic and applied research into clinical practice. Many rehabilitation professionals discuss the substantial gaps in communication between scientific groups (basic to applied research) and the potential "bridges" to facilitate this communication. In physical therapy, one of the largest gaps is the translation of applied research findings to implementation in clinical practice. In this educational session, the speakers' primary goal is to present different perspectives from individuals in the field of rehabilitation with strongly divergent backgrounds, but also with a common desire to use information gleaned from basic and applied scientific findings and "translate" them into clinical treatments.

    In the first section, 2 individuals with strong research backgrounds will present their current and previous efforts to facilitate this translation. In the second section, 2 individuals with strong clinical backgrounds will discuss their efforts to implement research-based findings to their treatment and assessment protocols during clinical practice. Both groups will discuss the primary focus of their translation, and the barriers and facilitators they have encountered. Solutions to these barriers and their relative success also will be discussed between panel members and through audience participation. The session will be moderated by an individual with a strong background in both clinical implementation and rehabilitation research. Approximately half of the time will be focused on audience participation to further understand additional barriers and their solutions.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Describe some of the established barriers and facilitators of translation of research evidence to clinical practice.
    • Recognize the potential strengths and weaknesses of researchers in rehabilitation to facilitate research translation.
    • Identify different processes that clinicians will use to provide evidence-based practice.
    • Recognize the potential role of "translators" and their efforts to facilitate communication to both researchers and clinicians.

    Writing an Abstract for Presentation

    Time: 3:00 pm–5:00 pm (See Program for Room)

    Level: Intermediate

    This is a joint program. See full description at Education programming.

  • ADVERTISEMENT
  •