Archive: CSM 2013: Sports Physical Therapy Programming

  • This is archived programming for CSM 2013. See current programming.

    Browse Sports Physical Therapy sessions by day. Return to the main topic menu 

    Sunday, January 20 | Monday, January 21 | Tuesday, January 22 | Wednesday, January 23 | Thursday, January 24 

    * Should you choose to preselect regular (not preconference) Tuesday-Thursday sessions during the registration process, please be advised that preselection is not a guarantee of a seat. Attendees are asked to preselect to better determine room size and all efforts will be made to accommodate sessions in the largest rooms possible. All attendees are encouraged to show up to sessions early. Attendees are also encouraged to select alternative sessions in the event their first choice is full. 

    Sunday, January 20 (Preconference)

    Titleist Performance Institute: Level 1 Golf Fitness Certification, Part 1

    Location: San Diego Convention Center | 2

    Time: 8:00 am - 5:30 pm

    Speakers: Lance Gill, MS, ATC; Barbara Hoogenboom, PT, EdD, SCS, ATC; Greg Rose, MD; Michael Voight, PT, DHSc, OCS, SCS, ATC, FAPTA; Dave Rose

    Level: Multiple Level

    CEUs: 1.5 (15.0 contact hours/CCUs)

    Special Registration: Register Here 

    This 2 day course is the entry-level course for certification in golf-specific fitness assessment. Designed for health providers who work with golf athletes, it is offered by the Titleist Performance Institute (TPI). It offers the latest information on golf performance, swing faults, and screening for golf performance.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Describe and correctly sequence the components of the golf swing using appropriate terminology.
    • Describe the Kinematic Sequence of the golf swing, and relate it to correct or incorrect performance of this complex skill.
    • Apply principles of the Kinematic Sequence to an analysis of the golf swing and identify the 12 most common swing faults.
    • Perform a sequential physical movement screen to identify movement dysfunction (including deficits in mobility and stability).
    • Identify, using the functional movement screening techniques, the major physical performance factors that limit golfers from reaching their potential.
    • Use 2-D and 3-D motion analysis technology and appropriate software to analyze the golf swing.
    • Apply concepts of physical screening in the context of a video or real-time case study.
    • Incorporate new knowledge into your existing practice or methodology
    • Describe possible mechanisms for promotion of a golf fitness program.

    Titleist Performance Institute Level 2: Medical Professional Certification, Part 1

    Location: San Diego Convention Center | 3

    Time: 8:00 am - 5:30 pm

    Speakers: Lance Gill, MS, ATC; Barbara Hoogenboom, PT, EdD, SCS, ATC; Greg Rose, MD; Michael Voight, PT, DHSc, OCS, SCS, ATC, FAPTA; Dave Rose

    Level: Multiple Level

    CEUs: 1.5 (15.0 contact hours/CCUs)

    Special Registration: Register Here 

    This 2 day course is designed for medical providers who work with golf athletes and is the second in a series of certification courses. Provided by Titleist Performance Institute (TPI), this course features an in-depth approach to movement screening and intervention strategies for golf athletes. Successful completion of TPI Level 1: Golf Fitness Certification is required to enroll in this course.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Describe the injury-inducing mechanics of the golf swing.
    • Relate injury-inducing mechanics to specific injuries sustained by the golfer.
    • Use a systematic, algorithmic approach for a functional assessment of the golfer.
    • Use the findings from the assessment to direct functional intervention choices.
    • Enhance your ability to care for injured golf athletes by using a comprehensive, detailed, functional approach.
    • Consider the possibilities for performance screening and enhancement using a multidisciplinary approach.

    Monday, January 21 (Preconference)

    Comprehensive Management of the Triathlete: Injury, Rehab, and Performance

    Location: San Diego Convention Center | 1B

    Time: 8:00 am - 5:30 pm

    Speakers: Shefali M. Christopher, PT, DPT, SCS, LAT, ATC; Scott Miller, PT, MS; John Cavanaugh, PT, MEd, ATC, SCS; Erik Moen, PT; Robert Maschi, PT, DPT, OCS, CSCS

    Level: Multiple Level

    CEUs: 0.8 (8.0 contact hours/CCUs)

    Preconference Pricing: Standard (1A)

    The triathlon is a growing sport. With the growth of this sport, physical therapists face the daunting task of treating the multisport athlete. A triathlon presents a multitude of challenges in each of its events, and requires unique preparation to transition from sport to sport. This course will give attendees an in-depth understanding of the physical demands, biomechanics, and injuries faced by triathletes and ways to help these athletes return to competition faster and injury-free.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Recognize the components and distances involved in the sport of triathlon.
    • Identify key medical issues faced in the sport and understand treatment guidelines.
    • Perform basic swim stroke evaluation and identify biomechanical variables to correlate to the development of injury in the triathlete.
    • Recognize the most current approaches for managing shoulder injuries as they relate to swimming.
    • Identify key sources of overuse injury and pain syndromes for the bicyclist.
    • Identify biomechanical differences between endurance "road bicycle" pedaling skills compared to aerodynamic pedaling.
    • Identify parameters critical for neutral aerodynamic bicycle fit.
    • Identify critical flexibility parameters that allow for best aerodynamic positioning on the bicycle.
    • Identify common injuries as well as biomechanical variables that correlate to the development of injury in runners and multisport athletes.
    • Develop a treatment program for injured runners and multisport athletes.

    The Female Runner Throughout the Lifespan

    Location: San Diego Convention Center | 1A

    Time: 8:00 am - 5:30 pm

    Speakers: Carol M. Ferkovic, PT, DPT; Mitchell J. Rauh, PT, PhD, MPH, FACSM; Kari Brown, PT, DPT, SCS; Bryan Heiderscheit, PT, PhD, DS; Blaise Williams, PT, PhD; Elizabeth Chumanov, PT, PhD; Jill Thein-Nissenbaum, PT, DsC, SCS, ATC; Lori T. Brody, PT, PhD, SCS

    Level: Multiple Level

    CEUs: 0.9 (9.0 contact hours/CCUs)

    Preconference Pricing: Standard (1A)

    The purpose of this 1-day preconference course is to assist the clinician with the management of issues that female running athletes may encounter throughout the lifespan. The speakers will discuss problems unique to adolescent females, pre and postpartum endurance athletes, and older females. In addition, this course will provide information on current research unique to these populations in regards to running-gait analysis, shoe wear, and special treatment considerations.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Identify risk factors for lower-extremity, overuse injuries and the etiology of the female athlete triad in adolescent female runners.
    • Recognize issues unique to the pregnant runner and to the postpartum runner and properly manage these issues.
    • Review the management of health issues in the older female runner, such as osteoarthritis, menopause, cancer, and osteoporosis.
    • Perform running-gait analysis and evaluate running biomechanics in youth, pre and postpartum, and older female running athletes.
    • Determine appropriate shoe wear and orthotics in youth, pre and postpartum, and older female running athletes.
    • Develop management techniques for hip, knee, and lower-leg injuries in youth, pre and postpartum, and older female running athletes.

    Titleist Performance Institute: Level 1 Golf Fitness Certification, Part 2

    Location: San Diego Convention Center | 2

    Time: 8:00 am - 5:30 pm

    Speakers: Lance Gill, MS, ATC; Barbara Hoogenboom, PT, EdD, SCS, ATC; Greg Rose, MD; Michael Voight, PT, DHSc, OCS, SCS, ATC, FAPTA; Dave Rose

    Level: Multiple Level

    CEUs: 1.5 (15.0 contact hours/CCUs)

    Special Registration: Register at Part 1

    This course is the entry-level course for certification in golf-specific fitness assessment. Designed for health providers who work with golf athletes, it is offered by the Titleist Performance Institute (TPI). It offers the latest information on golf performance, swing faults, and screening for golf performance.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Describe and correctly sequence the components of the golf swing using appropriate terminology.
    • Describe the Kinematic Sequence of the golf swing, and relate it to correct or incorrect performance of this complex skill.
    • Apply principles of the Kinematic Sequence to an analysis of the golf swing and identify the 12 most common swing faults.
    • Perform a sequential physical movement screen to identify movement dysfunction (including deficits in mobility and stability).
    • Identify, using the functional movement screening techniques, the major physical performance factors that limit golfers from reaching their potential.
    • Use 2-D and 3-D motion analysis technology and appropriate software to analyze the golf swing.
    • Apply concepts of physical screening in the context of a video or real-time case study.
    • Incorporate new knowledge into your existing practice or methodology
    • Describe possible mechanisms for promotion of a golf fitness program.

    Titleist Performance Institute Level 2: Medical Professional Certification, Part 2

    Location: San Diego Convention Center | 3

    Time: 8:00 am - 5:30 pm

    Speakers: Lance Gill, MS, ATC; Barbara Hoogenboom, PT, EdD, SCS, ATC; Greg Rose, MD; Michael Voight, PT, DHSc, OCS, SCS, ATC, FAPTA; Dave Rose

    Level: Multiple Level

    CEUs: 1.5 (15.0 contact hours/CCUs)

    Special Registration: Register at Part 1

    This course is designed for medical providers who work with golf athletes and is the second in a series of certification courses. Provided by Titleist Performance Institute (TPI), this course features an in-depth approach to movement screening and intervention strategies for golf athletes. Successful completion of TPI Level 1: Golf Fitness Certification is required to enroll in this course.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Describe the injury-inducing mechanics of the golf swing.
    • Relate injury-inducing mechanics to specific injuries sustained by the golfer.
    • Use a systematic, algorithmic approach for a functional assessment of the golfer.
    • Use the findings from the assessment to direct functional intervention choices.
    • Enhance your ability to care for injured golf athletes by using a comprehensive, detailed, functional approach.
    • Consider the possibilities for performance screening and enhancement using a multidisciplinary approach.

    Tuesday, January 22

    The Butt/Foot Bias: Solving the Patellofemoral Dilemma

    Time: 8:00 am–10:00 am (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Joe Black, PT, DPT; Jason Richardson, PT, DPT

    Level: Advanced

    Treating patellofemoral dysfunction, particularly as it relates to running, is common in orthopedic and sports practice. For this program, an approach to assessment and treatment of patellofemoral dysfunction that is from the perspective of the hip and pelvis will be presented alongside an approach that focuses more distally, from the perspective of foot biomechanics.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Describe how the hip and the foot can impact patellofemoral dysfunction.
    • Relate different impairments in the lower quarter to patellofemoral dysfunction, particularly as they pertain to running.
    • Prioritize your treatment focus to obtain more efficient outcomes in managing patellofemoral dysfunction.
    • Implement functional testing to assist with more efficient assessment of common patellofemoral dysfunction and running injuries.
    • Manipulate joint kinetics and kinematics to enhance exercise prescription.

    Navigating the Complicated Athletic Shoulder

    Time: 8:00 am–10:00 am (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Drew T. Jenk, PT, DPT; Michael E. Kordecki, PT, DPT, SCS, ATC; Robert Mangine, PT, MEd, ATC; Tal S. David, MD

    Level: Multiple Level

    This course is designed to provide the attendees with an in-depth review of specialized patient populations. The speakers will examine the clinical presentation, surgical options, diagnosis specific rehabilitation, and keys to return to sport for each condition. Attendees will learn the importance of understanding the patient population being treated, as well as their clinical presentation. The attendee should leave this course with a greater sport specific consideration for the complicated athletic shoulder specific to posterior instability and nerve entrapment.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Explain the biomechanical principles, at the shoulder, associated with traumatic and non-traumatic posterior shoulder instability and nerve entrapment conditions.
    • Describe the clinical presentation of each diagnosis.
    • Discuss the pathophysiology associated with each of these conditions.
    • Identify surgical considerations for each diagnosis.
    • Design a diagnosis-specific rehabilitation program to return the athlete back to play.

    Rehab of the Athlete’s Hip, Part 1: Impingement and Sports Hernia

    Time: 11:00 am–1:00 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Dawn Lorring, PT, M.Ed., MPT, CSCS, SCS; Michael P. Reiman, PT, DPT, CSCS, OCS, SCS, ATC, FAAOMPT; John Meyer, PT; Jill Thein-Nissenbaum, PT, DsC, SCS, ATC; Jason Snibbe, MD

    Level: Multiple Level

    This course will highlight the anatomy, pathomechanics, and surgical management of hip pathology in the athlete, specifically femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) impingement and sports hernia.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Discuss the anatomy and biomechanics of the hip and special considerations for the athletic population.
    • Identify and formulate a differential diagnosis for hip pathology with specific considerations for impingement and sports hernia/pubalgia.
    • Apply current conservative treatment techniques for hip pathology with special considerations between sexes.
    • Describe current surgical interventions for hip impingement and sports pubalgia/hernia.

    Rehab of the Athlete's Hip, Part 2: Muscle and Tendon Injuries

    Time: 3:00 pm–5:00 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Randall Lazicki, PT, DPT, SCS, CSCS, LAT, ATC; Mark F. Reinking, PT, PhD, SCS, ATC; Daniel Lorenz, PT, DPT, ATC, CSCS; Allen Hardin, PT, MS, CSCS, SCS, ATC, LAT; Gary Calabrese, PT

    Level: Multiple Level

    Muscle and tendon injures are extremely common and are unique in medicine in that they can be accurately diagnosed, in most cases, with clinical evidence alone. To this extent, clinicians have placed much emphasis on examination and diagnosis; however, the most effective rehabilitation strategies and progression to return an athlete to sport are often overlooked in many education sessions. The purpose of this session is to provide both scientific and clinical perspectives on the management of athletes’ muscle and tendon pathology. It will address the biology of injury and healing as well as update the participant on current soft tissue, strength and conditioning, and prevention theories, techniques, and applications to assist the clinician in safely and rapidly returning an athlete back to sport. Unique to this session will be a culminating panel discussion on rehabilitation techniques of muscle and tendon pathologies from various fields of sports physical therapy, including professional, collegiate, military, and outpatient practice settings.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Describe the biology of muscle and tendon injury and the stages of the healing process.
    • Identify evidenced-based soft tissue techniques, theories, and applications to assist in the rehabilitation of muscle or tendon pathology.
    • Apply current techniques and guidelines for the functional progression and return to sport of athletes following a muscle or tendon injury.
    • Provide intervention strategies and techniques for the prevention of muscle and tendon injury in sport.

    Wednesday, January 23

    Rehab of Young Adults With Intra-Articular Hip Disorders, Part 1

    Time: 8:00 am–10:00 am (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Marcie Harris-Hayes, PT, DPT, MSCI, OCS; Shirley Sahrmann, PT, PhD, FAPTA; Cara L. Lewis, PT, PhD; Nancy Bloom, PT, DPT, MSOT

    Level: Intermediate

    Identifying the causes of intra-articular hip pain in the young active adult can be a challenge. Attention has focused on femoral and acetabular abnormalities and their surgical correction. Recent studies suggest a higher incidence of these structural problems in soccer, basketball, and football players. Although structural abnormalities may contribute to hip pain, microtrauma due to faulty movement or muscle recruitment patterns also play an important role. Rehabilitation targeted at reducing microtrauma to hip joint structures provides an alternative or adjunct to surgery.

    This presentation will emphasize anatomical and biomechanical factors proposed to contribute to hip pain problems such as femoroacetabular impingement, structural instability, and acetabular labral tears. Part 1 will present current studies using imaging and clinical tests to describe the structural and muscular characteristics of the hip in people with hip pain. Additionally, clinical cases will demonstrate a systematic examination used to identify the hip as the source of symptoms and demonstrate the interaction of structural characteristics with other proposed contributing factors such as movement patterns during functional performance and athletic activity (type and intensity).

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Describe the structural characteristics of the hip and variations in patients with hip pain.
    • Discuss the importance of assessing the total kinetic chain in the diagnosis and treatment of patients with hip pain.
    • Describe a systematic examination to guide treatment of hip disorders.

    Athletic Injuries of the Forearm, Wrist, and Hand

    Time: 11:00 am–1:00 pm (See Program for Room)

    Level: Multiple Level

    This is a joint program. See full description at Hand Rehabilitation programming.

    The Complicated Patient

    Time: 11:00 am–1:00 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Christopher Garcia, PT, DPT, SCS; Patrick Pabian, PT, DPT, SCS, OCS; Doug Adams, PT, DPT, SCS; Trevor Winnegge, PT, DPT, MS, OCS; Ryan Decarreau, PT, DPT, ATC; Joshua Pniewski, PT, DPT

    Level: Multiple Level

    This session offers several interesting, complex, complicated, or difficult cases related to sports physical therapy. Details are provided regarding the diagnostic process, evaluation, intervention strategies, and outcomes. The presenter will highlight clinical decision making, critical thinking, and problem-solving strategies, and will present related evidence.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Discuss the diagnostic procedures used for a variety of difficult or complex clinical cases.
    • Critique the intervention strategies used by the presenting therapists.
    • Relate evidence, when available, to clinical decision making in case presentations.
    • Determine alterations of care based upon the success of interventions or the lack thereof.
    • Describe common outcome measures used for assessment and evaluation of patients with complex presentations.
    • Relate examination and intervention strategies to your clinical practice if similar patients or clients present.

    Rehab of Young Adults With Intra-Articular Hip Disorders, Part 2

    Time: 11:00 am–1:00 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Marcie Harris-Hayes, PT, DPT, MSCI, OCS; Shirley Sahrmann, PT, PhD, FAPTA; Cara L. Lewis, PT, PhD; Nancy Bloom, PT, DPT, MSOT

    Level: Intermediate

    Identifying the causes of intra-articular hip pain in the young active adult can be a challenge. Attention has focused on femoral and acetabular abnormalities and their surgical correction. Recent studies suggest a higher incidence of these structural problems in soccer, basketball, and football players. Although structural abnormalities may contribute to hip pain, microtrauma due to faulty movement or muscle recruitment patterns also play an important role. Rehabilitation targeted at reducing microtrauma to hip joint structures provides an alternative or adjunct to surgery.

    This presentation will emphasize anatomical and biomechanical factors proposed to contribute to hip pain problems such as femoroacetabular impingement, structural instability, and acetabular labral tears. Part 2, kinematic and kinetic research, will describe altered neuromuscular control in people with hip pain and demonstrate hip force changes that occur during different walking patterns and selected hip exercises. Treatment strategies including exercise and functional training to reduce forces on the hip joint will be presented. Case studies will demonstrate the development of diagnosis and treatment of hip pain based on clinical exam results.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Discuss altered neuromuscular control factors in individuals with hip pain.
    • Discuss the hip joint forces developed during walking and selected exercises.
    • Describe treatment strategies targeted at reducing forces to hip joint structures to decrease pain and promote healing.

    Treatment of the Pediatric Athlete: Lower-Quarter Injuries

    Time: 11:00 am–1:00 pm (See Program for Room)

    Level: Intermediate

    This is a joint program. See full description at Pediatrics programming.

    Extreme Conditioning Programs: Evaluating and Managing the Risk

    Time: 3:00 pm–5:00 pm (See Program for Room)

    Level: Basic

    This is a joint program. See full description at Federal Physical Therapy programming.

    The Missing Link: Relating Shoulder and Hip Joint Pathologies

    Time: 3:00 pm–5:00 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: John DeWitt, PT, DPT, SCS, ATC; Christopher Garcia, PT, DPT, SCS; Brian Leggin, PT, DPT, OCS; Michael Reiman, PT, DPT, OCS, SCS, ATC, LAT, FAAOMPT

    Level: Intermediate

    The shoulder and hip joints are both important contributors to normal upper and lower body function. Anatomic and functional similarities exist; however, it is unclear whether a correlation exists between common shoulder and hip injuries. Pathomechanics, as well as surgical and conservative management strategies of the shoulder joint, have been studied extensively; however, the hip joint has only recently been the focus of such scrutiny. This session will examine the extent of the anatomical, biomechanical, and pathological relationships between the shoulder and hip joints. Furthermore, presenters will elucidate the strength of evidence supporting effective treatment strategies for each respective joint, as well as how these treatment approaches can be applied to both joints allowing for safe return to sport.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Describe the parallels between shoulder and hip joint anatomy/biomechanics.
    • Discuss the common impairments related to regional interdependence between the 2 joints.
    • Review effective manual and corrective exercise strategies that can be applied to treat both joints.
    • Identify common risk factors to help prevent injury or to enable a safe return to sport.
    • Describe future directions of research exploring the relationship and regional interdependence between the shoulder and hip joints.

    Thursday, January 24

    Medial and Lateral Knee Pathology: Clinical Examination, Imaging, and Surgery

    Time: 8:00 am–10:00 am (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Terry Malone, PT, EdD, ATC, FAPTA; George Davies, PT, DPT, SCS, FAPTA; Donald C. Fithian, MD

    Level: Multiple Level

    Although anterior cruciate ligament injury and patellofemoral pain are commonly encountered pathologies, the physical therapist also is challenged to address other medial and lateral compartment knee structures. Examples include pathology related to the medial collateral ligament, lateral collateral ligament, menisci, and the arcuate-popliteal complex. The purpose of this session is to provide a systematic approach for the examination of the knee as well as the use of imaging to enhance clinical decision-making. This session will conclude with an update regarding surgical procedures to address these various pathologies. Information presented will reflect evidence from the current scientific literature.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Develop and implement a systematic approach for the examination of the knee.
    • Identify imaging techniques that will enhance clinical decision-making for knee pathology.
    • Address the clinical relevance between physical examination findings and imaging results.
    • Recognize indications for a variety of surgical procedures used to address various knee pathologies.

    The Adolescent Female Athlete

    Time: 11:00 am–1:00 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Carol M. Ferkovic, PT, DPT; Mitchell J. Rauh, PT, PhD, MPH, FACSM; Mark V. Paterno, PT, PhD, MBA, SCS, ATC; Ellen Shanley, PT, PhD, OCS

    Level: Multiple Level

    Female sports participation has continued to increase since the implementation of Title IX in 1972. With increased opportunities for young girls to participate in sports, there is potential for increased injury rates among this population. Adolescent female athletes are especially at risk. Management of these issues can be challenging for the clinician as it requires an understanding of the neuromuscular, musculoskeletal, and biomechanical development of the young female athlete. This 2-hour session will provide an overview of common injuries in adolescent female athletes and address issues unique to this population, such as the female athlete triad, hip and trunk neuromuscular training, anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury prevention, and shoulder and elbow injuries.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Identify common injuries for adolescent female athletes at the middle and high school levels.
    • Discuss the prevalence and potential impact of female athlete triad in adolescent female athletes.
    • Develop interventions to address trunk and hip neuromuscular control issues in adolescent female athletes.
    • Identify adolescent female athletes who are at risk for sustaining an ACL injury and develop interventions to address these risk factors.
    • Recognize shoulder and elbow injuries unique to adolescent female athletes and implement evidence-based rehabilitation plans to treat these issues.

    Examining Proximal Contributors to Knee Function: From Lab to Clinic

    Time: 3:00 pm–5:00 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Christopher M. Powers, PT, PhD, FAPTA; Barton Bishop, PT, DPT, SCS

    Level: Multiple Level

    Anterior cruciate ligament injury, patellofemoral pain, and iliotibial band syndrome are commonly encountered knee pathologies. Although the management of each may differ, they do have a commonality in that faulty hip and trunk mechanics may contribute to pathology. The purpose of this session is to first, summarize the latest evidence regarding the influence of altered hip and trunk function on knee pathology from a biomechanical perspective; and second, to address functional screens to identify faulty trunk and lower-extremity movement patterns that may contribute to knee pathology. The session will conclude with a description of intervention strategies to target and improve aberrant movements.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Identify mechanisms by which faulty hip and trunk function can contribute to knee pathology.
    • Recognize movement screens that may identify aberrant trunk and lower-extremity movement patterns.
    • Describe intervention strategies to correct faulty movement patterns noted during movement screens.
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