Archive: CSM 2013: Women's Health Programming

  • This is archived programming for CSM 2013. See current programming.

    Browse Women's Health sessions by day. Return to the main topic menu

    Sunday, January 20 | Monday, January 21 | Tuesday, January 22 | Wednesday, January 23 | Thursday, January 24

    * Should you choose to preselect regular (not preconference) Tuesday-Thursday sessions during the registration process, please be advised that preselection is not a guarantee of a seat. Attendees are asked to preselect to better determine room size and all efforts will be made to accommodate sessions in the largest rooms possible. All attendees are encouraged to show up to sessions early. Attendees are also encouraged to select alternative sessions in the event their first choice is full.

    Sunday, January 20 (Preconference)

    The Practical Application of Mental Imagery in the Therapeutic Setting, Part 1

    Location: Hilton Bayfront |Aqua 308

    Time: 8:00 am - 5:00 pm

    Speakers: Eric Franklin

    Level: Multiple Level

    CEUs: 1.6 (16.0 contact hours/CCUs)

    Preconference Pricing: Standard Plus (2B) 2 Day

    Mental imagery is not just for athletes; it is a most versatile tool for health with a solid scientific foundation. This hands-on session introduces the use of mental imagery as a practical tool to release tension and pain and increase flexibility and ease of movement in all areas of the body. Mental imagery is a safe and effective intervention that can be used at any age and for any population. This session will introduce the science of imagery, its most effective use, the types of imagery, and the most beneficial imagery perspectives and sensory modalities. Special emphasis will be placed on releasing tension in the shoulders, neck, and lower back; improving posture; and training the pelvic floor with the use of imagery. Attendees will leave the course with a personal experience of the benefits of imagery as well as a treasure trove of client-centered applications.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Describe a client-centered approach for releasing shoulder and neck tension, increasing flexibility, and improving the health of the spine and pelvic floor.
    • Recognize the science of imagery in practice.
    • Describe the effective use of a variety of types of imagery.
    • Identify imagery perspectives and sensory modalities useful in clinical practice.

    Monday, January 21 (Preconference)

    The Practical Application of Mental Imagery in the Therapeutic Setting, Part 2

    Location: Hilton Bayfront |Aqua 308

    Time: 8:00 am - 5:00 pm

    Speakers: Eric Franklin

    Level: Multiple Level

    CEUs: 1.6 (16.0 contact hours/CCUs)

    Preconference Pricing: Standard Plus (2B) 2 Day

    Mental imagery is not just for athletes; it is a most versatile tool for health with a solid scientific foundation. This hands-on session introduces the use of mental imagery as a practical tool to release tension and pain and increase flexibility and ease of movement in all areas of the body. Mental imagery is a safe and effective intervention that can be used at any age and for any population. This session will introduce the science of imagery, its most effective use, the types of imagery, and the most beneficial imagery perspectives and sensory modalities. Special emphasis will be placed on releasing tension in the shoulders, neck, and lower back; improving posture; and training the pelvic floor with the use of imagery. Attendees will leave the course with a personal experience of the benefits of imagery as well as a treasure trove of client-centered applications.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Describe a client-centered approach for releasing shoulder and neck tension, increasing flexibility, and improving the health of the spine and pelvic floor.
    • Recognize the science of imagery in practice.
    • Describe the effective use of a variety of types of imagery.
    • Identify imagery perspectives and sensory modalities useful in clinical practice.

    Tuesday, January 22

    Drama Queen or Central Sensitization? Understanding Pain Hypersensitivity and Its Effects on the Pelvic Floor

    Time: 8:00 am–10:00 am (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Denise Jagroo, PT, DPT, WCS; Jill Hoefs, PT, MPT

    Level: Multiple Level

    Patients sometimes develop multiple chronic pain and chronic pelvic pain syndromes. This can be due to changes that occur in the central nervous system that allow for heightened sensitivity to nerve stimulation. Patients with visceral pain syndromes, such as painful bladder syndrome and irritable bowel syndrome, demonstrate influences of central sensitization. The development of several different pelvic pain conditions, such as these, can exist due to "neural cross talk." This neural wind-up explains the interface and interaction of chronic pelvic pain conditions. The results of these conditions are visceral pain, muscular instability, and overactive pelvic floor muscles. Learn about these processes and how to manage these patients who present with overactive pelvic floor syndrome.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Discuss the neural process of central sensitization.
    • Recognize how conditions involving pelvic organs can increase central sensitization effects.
    • Describe how visceral pain and the viscera-muscular reflex can lead to muscular instability.
    • Manage patients with central sensitization and overactive pelvic floor syndrome.

    A Day in the Life of a Women's Health Physical Therapy Resident

    Time: 11:00 am–1:00 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Uchenna Ossai, PT, DPT; Marcy Crouch, PT, DPT, CLT; Jennifer Miller; Stephanie Foumier; Amber Anderson, PT, DPT

    Level: Basic

    In this workshop both current and past women’s health residents will discuss what to expect with residency. The discussion will review current residencies available, as well as the application requirements and the daily expectations of being a women's health resident. Following this discussion, the panel will address questions related to the specific application process and benefits of each residency program.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • List which current women's health residencies are accepting applicants.
    • Recognize the difference between a women's health residency that is accredited, in the accreditation process, or developing.
    • Discuss what a resident of each available program does on a daily basis and the overall program requirements.
    • Describe how completion of a residency can benefit career development in women's heath PT.
    • Explain the application requirements for each available women's health residency.
    • Complete the application process for each available women's health residency.

    Pelvic Floor Therapy for Bowel Disorders: Insights on Dysfunctions and Treatment Approaches

    Time: 11:00 am–1:00 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Anne Barthelemy, PT

    Level: Basic

    Pelvic floor therapists are increasingly more likely to encounter patients who have bowel disorders related to pelvic floor dysfunctions. This presentation is aimed at giving pelvic floor therapists a broader view of how their skills can be expanded to evaluation and treatment of bowel dysfunctions. In the US, multidisciplinary teams are offering comprehensive care to patients. Specialties such as gastroenterology, gynecology, urology, radiology, and colorectal surgery are likely to refer patients to pelvic floor physical therapists. This presentation will touch on the most common bowel conditions and some of the interventions, including biofeedback and rectal balloon training, being utilized by the pelvic floor physical therapy team at the University of Michigan Health System.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Recognize how bowel disorders relate to pelvic floor dysfunctions.
    • Evaluate relevant medical testing to help design a treatment pathway.
    • Expand your pelvic floor clinical practice to include bowel dysfunction patients.
    • Discuss evidence-based studies on physical therapy interventions and the need for more research.

    Pilates in Clinical Practice

    Time: 11:00 am–1:00 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Bruce S. Crawford, MD

    Level: Multiple Level

    Pelvic floor disorders are absolutely epidemic. Stress urinary incontinence, overactive bladder, female sexual dysfunction, pelvic organ prolapse, and fecal incontinence are often regarded as the inevitable consequences of childbirth and aging. The presenter, a surgeon, will discuss management of these disorders with a neuromuscular solution. Pilates utilizes Pilates exercises based on extensive EMG recordings taken from the pelvic floor. Pilates was created to provide a widely accessible method of recovering or enhancing pelvic floor strength.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Describe common pelvic floor disorders affecting women.
    • Assess conventional management options for pelvic floor disorders.
    • Explain the relevance of fitness training in the prevention and management of pelvic floor disorders.
    • Discuss the Origin of the Pfilates Movements.
    • Apply Pfilates in a clinical practice.

    A Prospective Surveillance Model for Rehabilitation for Women With Breast Cancer: An Emerging, Evidence-based Standard of Care

    Time: 11:00 am–1:00 pm (See Program for Room)

    Level: Multiple Level

    This is a joint program. See full description at Oncology programming.

    The Functional Hip

    Time: 3:00 pm–5:00 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Jeffrey T. Stenback, PT, OCS; Shaw Bronner, PT, PhD, OCS; Susan Clinton, PT

    Level: Intermediate

    This course will introduce a discussion of functional hip and related anatomy with consideration of differential diagnoses in this area. The presenters will examine relevant biomechanics and functional muscular relationships. The course will include discussion of plan of care considerations along with demonstration of exercises to address clinical findings. Consideration of the hip relationship to the lumbar-pelvic region, sacroiliac joint, and pelvic floor control will be covered. Case studies will be presented to apply principles and encourage attendee interaction.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Identify biomechanics of the hip joint and lumbosacral region.
    • Describe relevant joint end feels.
    • Identify functional muscle relationships.
    • Describe applicable differential diagnoses.
    • Design a plan of care to address functional deficits in this area.
    • Design and apply a basic exercise program.

    Imagery and Exercise for the Pelvis

    Time: 3:00 pm–5:00 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Eric Franklin

    Level: Multiple Level

    This presentation will examine the clinical applications of imagery techniques to increase the power, alignment, and flexibility of the pelvic joints and muscles. A special focus will be imagery designed to tone and strengthen the pelvic floor and improve the functional ability of the lower back, knees, and feet.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Experience effortless alignment and balance for the whole body through experiential understanding of the pelvic bones and joints.
    • Discover and apply the dynamic alignment of the sacrum.
    • Explain the importance of the pelvic ligaments in creating the pelvic tensegrity system.
    • Experience how the pelvic floor musculature relates to the abdominal, lower back and hip flexor musculature.
    • Effectively apply mental motor imagery to the pelvic floor.
    • Perform ball and imagery exercises to train and balance the pelvic joints and muscles.

    Social Media and Technology for Physical Therapy Practice: Get Involved!

    Joint Program: Education

    Time: 3:00 pm–5:00 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Sandy Hilton, PT, MS; Tracy Sher, PT, MPT

    Level: Intermediate

    Join us for an overview of social media and technology beyond basic marketing. We will address the ability to pull information from Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, RSS feeds, and other online resources. This interactive journey through the internet will cover online exercise programs, web-based documentation, health and research blogs, and the international online community in physical therapy. Specific examples will apply to pelvic health and orthopedics.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Describe the value of social media in health care to promote patient education and professional development.
    • Identify 3 resources for online access to current practice trends, research, and clinical commentary within physical therapy.
    • Demonstrate an understanding of the pros and cons of a strong online presence.
    • Optimize your time online to pull the information you want without wasted effort.

    Wednesday, January 23

    Highlights in Obstetrics Physical Therapy, Part 1: Introduction to Obstetrics Physical Therapy

    Time: 8:00 am–10:00 am (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Valerie L. Bobb, PT, MPT, WCS, ATC; Susan A. Steffes, PT, CD(DONA); Karen Litos, PT, MPT

    Level: Basic

    Literature has shown that 30%-50% of women experience severe enough pain to lose time from work or social interaction and 20%-72% report pelvic girdle pain at some point during their pregnancy (Mogren). This session is for women’s health PTs who are interested in expanding their knowledge base of the obstetric client or may be interested in specializing in obstetrics physical therapy. This session also is for orthopedic PTs who have pregnant or postpartum clients and want to feel more prepared to evaluate and treat this population, with their unique anatomic and physiological demands. Part 1 will describe the physiologic and anatomic changes during pregnancy and how they relate to patients' pain complaints, including modified exam techniques, differential diagnosis, common pain generators, safe and appropriate modalities, stabilization exercises, and biomechanics of the pregnant woman. The session will also discuss exercise guidelines, preparing you to discuss appropriate exercise. The session will conclude with case study presentations.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Describe the anatomic and physiologic changes related to pregnancy and how they affect evaluation and intervention.
    • Perform an appropriate evaluation of a pregnant patient with musculoskeletal dysfunction or pain.
    • Differentiate between low back, pelvic girdle, and hip pain/dysfunction in the pregnant patient.
    • Develop functional goals for musculoskeletal impairments in pregnancy based on a systematic interview and examination of the patient.
    • Develop an evidence-based plan of care with physical therapy interventions for pregnant patients addressing selected musculoskeletal impairments or dysfunction.
    • Identify biomechanical strategies to reduce pain in the pregnant patient while performing daily activities.

    Preparing for the Women's Health Specialization Exam (WCS): Tools for Support and Success

    Time: 8:00 am–10:00 am (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Elizabeth Hampton, PT, WCS, BCB-PMD; Stacy L. Tylka, PT, DPT, WCS, CLT; Wendy Fox, PT, DPT, GCS, WCS; Victoria Schwartz, PT, DPT, WCS; Eliza Andrews, PT, WCS

    Level: Multiple Level

    This session will offer you with helpful suggestions to prepare for the ABPTS Women's Health Specialization Exam, including feedback to prepare the application and the case reflection enabling you to sit for the exam. The presenters will provide information regarding eligibility requirements, submission of the WH Specialization Exam application, and the roles and responsibilities of the WCS in the clinic and to the profession as a certified specialist. Chocolate and encouragement are both provided in this delightful educational session.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Review the steps needed to complete the Women's Health Specialization application and case reflection.
    • Apply suggestions from the panel to determine the most appropriate way for you to prepare for the exam.
    • Establish an action plan for the application for the Women's Health Specialization exam, the case reflection, and a studying methodology.
    • Describe the ABPTS certification process, including the minimum eligibility requirements and application process.
    • Describe the process of examination evaluation and obtaining results.
    • Consider the role and responsibilities of the newly certified clinical specialist.

    Men's Health Issues: An Introduction From Front to Rear

    Time: 8:00 am–10:00 am (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Daniel J. Kirages, PT, DPT, Jason J. Kutch, PhD

    Level: Multiple Level

    With 6%-12% of men suffering from chronic pelvic pain and 4%-21% of men experiencing urinary incontinence, the role of physical therapy for men's health issues has never been more important. Whether the symptoms are pelvic region pain in a younger group or bladder control problems in an older group, physical therapists play a large part in their recovery. This session's presenters will guide you through several clinical presentations of men's health issues throughout the lifespan. You will see both low-tech and high-tech methods of investigation and intervention to assist with proper clinical decision making. These patients need you, and this presentation will be a link toward adding them into your daily appointment schedule.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Explain common concepts of men's health issues, such as bladder and bowel dysfunctions including post-prostatectomy incontinence, and pelvic region pain syndromes.
    • Describe anatomical and physiological mechanisms that potentially contribute to male pelvic floor muscle dysfunctions.
    • Apply principles of examination, evaluation, and intervention of common male pelvic floor muscle dysfunctions using sEMG, 2D, and 3D sonographic imaging, manual therapy, behavioral techniques, and therapeutic exercise.
    • Identify men's health issues within a typical outpatient musculoskeletal setting and explain why you should embrace learning more about this population.
    • Explore ongoing research efforts to determine useful screening tools via sonographic imaging, sEMG, and fMRI to enhance the effectiveness of physical therapy evaluation and intervention.

    Highlights in Obstetrics Physical Therapy, Part 2: Advanced Topics

    Time: 11:00 am–1:00 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Valerie L. Bobb, PT, MPT, WCS, ATC; Susan A. Steffes, PT, CD(DONA); Karen Litos, PT, MPT

    Level: Multiple Level

    Research shows that women with pelvic pain are 3 times more likely to suffer from postpartum depressive symptoms (Gutke 2007) and that 37% of women will have back pain persisting 6 months postpartum if left untreated during pregnancy (Larsen 1997). This session is for women’s health PTs who are interested in expanding their knowledge base of the obstetric client or may be interested in specializing in obstetrics physical therapy. This session also is for orthopedic PTs who have pregnant or postpartum clients and want to feel more prepared to evaluate and treat this population, with their unique anatomic and physiological demands. Part 2 will describe the PT's role in education for labor and delivery positioning to potentially improve birth outcomes, spending a significant amount of time discussing the postpartum period and the unique challenges to rehabilitating "common complaints" in the postpartum client. The final area of discussion will include specialized areas within pregnancy: the pregnant client with special orthopedic, neurologic, or high risk concerns on bed rest; and treatment considerations for the pregnant athlete.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Provide consultation for pregnant patients on labor and delivery positioning strategies that may positively influence maternal and fetal outcomes.
    • Describe the anatomic and physiologic changes related to postpartum and how they affect evaluation and intervention.
    • Develop an evidence-based plan of care for physical therapy intervention of the postpartum patients with musculoskeletal impairments or dysfunction.
    • Be proficient with specialized history taking and interpretation of information in the postpartum client, and with identifying additional structures for evaluation and rehabilitation.
    • Develop an appropriate plan of care for physical therapy intervention for patients with a high-risk pregnancy.
    • Describe considerations and resources for pregnant or postpartum patients with select neurologic or orthopedic medical diagnoses.
    • Describe considerations for pregnancy and postpartum in the female athlete, and how athletic status affects rehabilitation and training.

    Physical Therapy Considerations for the Patient Post Prostatectomy

    Joint Program: Oncology

    Time: 11:00 am–1:00 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Vicki Lukert, PT; Meryl Alappattu, PT, DPT

    Level: Intermediate

    Post-prostatectomy incontinence (PPI) is a prevalent, unfortunate consequence of prostate cancer surgical intervention. Even with improvements in surgical methods the prevalence of PPI is estimated at 56% in the 6 weeks following surgery, and up to 44% of males report incontinence during sexual activity within the first 3 months post-surgery. Other complications to be addressed are urine urgency and frequency, and abdominal and pelvic pain. To help the growing number of physical therapists who treat men following prostatectomy, this lecture will describe commonly used surgical interventions for prostatectomy and their anatomical and physiological effects on continence; provide evidence-based treatment recommendations for the physical therapist management of PPI; discuss treatment options for other complications of surgery; compare and contrast management of male urinary incontinence and female urinary incontinence; and describe outcomes of a multidisciplinary approach in the development of PPI pelvic floor rehabilitation program.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Describe commonly used surgical interventions for prostatectomy and their anatomical and physiological effects on continence.
    • List the necessary physical therapy interventions to successfully treat this patient population.
    • Recognize the special considerations in treating the patient following prostatectomy surgery.
    • Describe the additional medical and equipment considerations for this patient population.
    • Use information to expand your practice of treating patients following prostatectomy surgery.

    There's an App for That! Using Technology for Practice and Learning

    Time: 11:00 am–1:00 pm (See Program for Room)

    Level: Multiple Level

    This is a joint program. See full description at Education programming.

    Liberating the Neck and Shoulder: Movement Over a Fluid Spine and Pelvis

    Time: 3:00 pm–5:00 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Eric Franklin

    Level: Multiple Level

    This session will review imagery, touch, and movement exercises for shoulder and neck musculature; discuss the role of tension and associated mental anxiety in function; explore movement awareness for restoring normal movement patterns in the upper body by activating the pelvic floor foundation and increasing awareness of tightness and muscular rigidity; review anatomy of the shoulder girdle and explore awareness exercises; and discuss functional application of exercise for neck, shoulder, and pelvis for use in patient education.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Review imagery and simple exercises that reduce shoulder and neck tension.
    • Discuss the evolutionary background of shoulder girdle anatomy.
    • Apply exercise and imagery for balance and poise of a centered head on a liberated spine.
    • Describe patient/client-centered imagery and practical home exercises.
    • Demonstrate application of mental motor imagery.

    Pelvic Girdle Pain During the Childbearing Year: The Essential Role of Physical Therapy

    Time: 3:00 pm–5:00 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Ann Dunbar, PT, DPT, MS

    Level: Basic

    Recent research has contributed significantly to our understanding of pelvic girdle pain (PGP), a common pain problem experienced by many women during their pregnancies and in some cases beyond. Given the biomechanical nature and mobility problems associated with pelvic girdle pain, physical therapists are a primary care provider for this population. This session will offer the latest research on the definition, epidemiology, risk factors, and clinical features of PGP. A review of the tests and measures essential for differential diagnosis will be included. Also incorporated into this session will be a variety of interventions including motor control of the deep spine stabilizing system, patient education topics, garments, taping applications, and self-care tips. Case studies will illustrate the role of the PT in meeting the needs of this population.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Define and differentiate between pelvic girdle pain (PGP) and other related musculoskeletal complaints of the childbearing year.
    • Discuss pathophysiology, epidemiology, risk factors, and clinical features of PGP.
    • Complete a physical exam and assessment.
    • Develop individualized intervention programs based on patient evaluation.

    Pudendal Neuralgia: Differential Diagnosis, Treatment, Surgery, and Post-op Care

    Time: 3:00 pm–5:00 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Loretta J. Robertson, PT, MS; Michael Hibner, MD, PhD

    Level: Multiple Level

    This session will review the anatomy and current knowledge regarding the diagnosis of pudendal neuralgia. The presenters will discuss current and emerging conservative treatment options and the challenges associated with diagnosing and caring for patients with pudendal neuralgia. Hibner will review his criteria for surgery and his surgical approach.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Describe the anatomy of the pudendal nerve, possible entrapment sights, and the clinical signs and tests leading to a diagnosis of pudendal neuralgia.
    • Review the complexity of the patient diagnosed with pudendal neuralgia and the pros and cons associated with the different treatment approaches.
    • Discuss Hibner's surgical approach and post-op care issues.

    Thursday, January 24

    Pelvic Pain: Physical Therapy Versus Injections

    Time: 8:00 am–10:00 am (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Susan Clinton, PT; Susan E. George, PT, DPT, OCS, WCS; Gary Chimes, MD, PhD

    Level: Intermediate

    This will be a session set up as a "point-counterpoint" with a case study on the evidence for physical therapy versus injections for an individual with chronic pelvic girdle pain. The physical therapy evidence for examination and intervention will be explored and contrasted to the physical medicine evidence for sacroiliac joint injection.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Identify the evidence for the physical therapy examination and intervention for an individual with chronic pelvic pain.
    • Describe the anatomical, biomechanical, and functional considerations of chronic pelvic girdle pain.
    • Recognize the evidence for SI joint injections with chronic pelvic girdle pain.
    • Identify when injections should be implemented in this patient population.

    The Role of Yoga in the Treatment of Pelvic Pain *Session attendance at capacity*

    Time: 8:00 am–10:00 am (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Dustienne Miller, PT, MSPT

    Level: Basic

    The popularity of yoga in the United States continues to increase. As biomechanical experts, physical therapists have the unique opportunity to educate their patients about how to safely participate in group fitness classes. Patients with pelvic pain and fibromyalgia are often concerned that movement will increase their pain, and as physical therapists we are positioned to empower them. A gentle home yoga program can be designed to bring balance to the autonomic nervous system, and flexibility and strength to the body. Through mindfulness training, these patients can monitor and replenish their energy more effectively and manage flare ups with less frustration and pain. This session is a perfect starting point for the physical therapist who is interested in learning more about a gentle yoga practice. While the class is geared towards women’s health physical therapists, all other section members are welcome to attend.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Recognize the current research available on the efficacy of yoga as a valuable aspect of the holistic healing model.
    • Demonstrate 4 asanas and pranayamas useful for men and women with pelvic pain.
    • Identify additional breathing techniques and guidelines for when it is appropriate to use these them.

    The Complicated Patient

    Time: 11:00 am–1:00 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Tracy Spitznagle, PT, DPT; Christina Holladay, PT, DPT, WCS, CLT-LANA

    Level: Intermediate

    Complicated patients that have multisystem involvement need focused treatment interventions. Successful decision-making to achieve good patient care outcomes starts with examining the patient and determining a diagnosis. Success in achieving Vision 2020 depends, at least in part, on physical therapists diagnosing conditions that are within the scope of their practice; consistently using commonly understood terminology for describing the conditions that affect the movement system of their patients; and implementing treatment interventions that are reflective of the diagnosis. Specialists have the expertise needed to lead the profession in defining, labeling, and suggesting interventions related to the diagnoses that are relevant to physical therapists' practice. The purposes of this session are to engage specialty section members in a collegial dialog about what “labels” should be used for the conditions physical therapists diagnose and to demonstrate how the diagnoses facilitates implementation of interventions. An introduction to some of the issues related to labeling will be provided in a brief summary prior to case presentations. Case descriptions of 2 episodes of care for 2 patients will follow.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Recognize some of the issues and challenges facing the physical therapy profession regarding diagnosis.
    • Appreciate the need for widespread, consistent use of commonly understood terminology for diagnosing conditions of the human movement system.
    • Explain how movement-related diagnoses will impact the clinical practices of both oncology specialists and women's health specialists.
    • Participate in defining, "labeling," and cataloging movement-related diagnoses that are within the scope of physical therapy practice.
    • Recognize the decision-making process from diagnosis to treatment implementation.

    The Role of Yoga in the Treatment of Pelvic Pain *Repeat session*

    Time: 11:00 am–1:00 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Dustienne Miller, PT, MSPT

    Level: Basic

    The popularity of yoga in the United States continues to increase. As biomechanical experts, physical therapists have the unique opportunity to educate their patients about how to safely participate in group fitness classes. Patients with pelvic pain and fibromyalgia are often concerned that movement will increase their pain, and as physical therapists we are positioned to empower them. A gentle home yoga program can be designed to bring balance to the autonomic nervous system, and flexibility and strength to the body. Through mindfulness training, these patients can monitor and replenish their energy more effectively and manage flare ups with less frustration and pain. This session is a perfect starting point for the physical therapist who is interested in learning more about a gentle yoga practice. While the class is geared towards women's health physical therapists, all other section members are welcome to attend.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Recognize the current research available on the efficacy of yoga as a valuable aspect of the holistic healing model.
    • Demonstrate 4 asanas and pranayamas useful for men and women with pelvic pain.
    • Identify additional breathing techniques and guidelines for when it is appropriate to use these them.

    What Does a Women's Health Physical Therapist REALLY Do?

    Time: 11:00 am–1:00 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Valerie L. Bobb, PT, MPT, WCS, ATC; Christina Holladay, PT, DPT, WCS, CLT-LANA; Marcy Crouch, PT, DPT, CLT, WCS

    Level: Basic

    Emerging leaders will discuss their work in the field of women's health. Topics will include pelvic pain, incontinence, pregnancy and post partum, the female athlete, osteoporosis, and lymphedema. The speakers also will discuss how they got their start in the field of women's health. This forum is geared towards students as well as practicing PTs who would like to learn more about women's health physical therapy.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Describe the many different aspects of women's health physical therapy.
    • Discuss the different pathways that can be taken to become a women's health physical therapist.
    • Gain experience from emerging leaders in the field of women's health.

    Abdominal Pain With Running: Is It Mechanical or Gastrointestinal in Origin?

    Time: 3:00 pm–5:00 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Tracy Spitznagle, PT, DPT; Ryan DeGeeter, PT, DPT

    Level: Basic

    Abdominal pain commonly occurs during running. Little is known about this frustrating and sometimes performance-limiting complaint, except that it resolves quickly after people stop running. Exercise-related, transient abdominal pain has been reported by individuals that participate in cycling, swimming, basketball, and horse riding. However, the incidence of exercise-related, transient abdominal pain is more commonly associated with running. Both mechanical and gastrointestinal sources of abdominal pain during running have been identified. The purpose of the presentation is to address 2 important clinical questions: (1) What is known about source of symptoms in individuals with abdominal pain during running? and (2) What are appropriate examination items to use with individuals who have abdominal pain during running? Answers to the questions will be drawn from a review of the literature on abdominal pain during running and case examples of female athletes who experience abdominal pain during running. The presentation also will illustrate how developing a movement system diagnosis and identifying the contributing factors based on a systematic examination can be used in individuals with abdominal pain.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Recognize the common mechanical and gastrointestinal symptoms found in individuals that present with abdominal pain during running.
    • Describe examination items that should be considered when evaluating an individual with abdominal pain during running.
    • Explain how the use of movement-related diagnoses can direct the care of athletes with abdominal pain during running.

    Pelvic Pain Management With Intramuscular Manual Therapy (IMT) Trigger Point Dry Needling of the Pelvic Floor

    Time: 3:00 pm–5:00 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Dawn Sandalcidi, PT, RCMT, BCB-PMD

    Level: Advanced

    This lecture will discuss the role of intramuscular manual therapy (IMT) in the management of the patient with pelvic pain. Neurophysiological, chemical, and mechanical treatment effects as they relate to pelvic pain will be discussed. The speaker will review through pictures and video demonstration the use of IMT in clinical practice. Current information also will be given on states allowed to perform dry needling and access to find therapists who are certified.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Define what intramuscular manual therapy is and describe its role in pelvic pain.
    • Discuss neuropathic pain processing and its relationship to trigger points.
    • Review the neurophysiological, mechanical, and chemical effects of IMT.
    • Discuss safety and contraindications of IMT of the perineum.
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