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    New in the Literature: Weight Loss, Exercise, and Obesity (N Engl J Med. 2011 Mar 31;364:1218-29)

    Findings published in the March 31 issue of NEJM suggests that a combination of weight loss and exercise provides greater improvement in physical function than either intervention alone in older adults who are obese.

    In this 1-year, randomized controlled trial, researchers evaluated the independent and combined effects of weight loss and exercise in 107 adults who were 65 years of age or older and obese. Participants were randomly assigned to a control group, a weight-management (diet) group, an exercise group, or a weight-management-plus-exercise (diet-exercise) group. The primary outcome was the change in score on the modified Physical Performance Test. Secondary outcomes included other measures of frailty, body composition, bone mineral density, specific physical functions, and quality of life.

    A total of 93 participants (87%) completed the study. In the intention-to-treat analysis, the score on the Physical Performance Test, in which higher scores indicate better physical status, increased more in the diet-exercise group than in the diet group or the exercise group (increases from baseline of 21% vs 12% and 15%, respectively); the scores in all 3 of those groups increased more than the scores in the control group (in which the score increased by 1%). Moreover, the peak oxygen consumption improved more in the diet-exercise group than in the diet group or the exercise group (increases of 17% vs 10% and 8%, respectively); the score on the Functional Status Questionnaire, in which higher scores indicate better physical function, increased more in the diet-exercise group than in the diet group (increase of 10% vs 4%). Body weight decreased by 10% in the diet group and by 9% in the diet-exercise group, but did not decrease in the exercise group or the control group. Lean body mass and bone mineral density at the hip decreased less in the diet-exercise group than in the diet group (reductions of 3% and 1%, respectively, in the diet-exercise group vs reductions of 5% and 3%, respectively, in the diet group). Strength, balance, and gait improved consistently in the diet-exercise group. Adverse events included a small number of exercise-associated musculoskeletal injuries.

    APTA members David Sinacore, PT, PhD, FAPTA, and Tiffany Hilton, PT, PhD, coauthored the study. 


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