• Tuesday, December 17, 2013RSS Feed

    Physical Therapy Named a 'Top Job' for 2014

    Physical therapists (PTs) have been listed among the career paths with the strongest recent growth and most potential for expansion in the future, with rates of increase greater than registered nurses and database administrators, among others.

    According to rankings from Forbes magazine, PTs are the fifth strongest-growth professionals, behind software developers and market research analysts, but ahead of web developers and petroleum engineers. The ratings were based on a recent study (.pdf) by Career Builder and Economic Modeling Specialists Inc.

    The Career Builder study projects that the US workforce will grow by 4.4% 2013–2017 and estimates the PT workforce to increase by 13% during the same time. The study's total projected number of PTs in the workforce is roughly similar to projections generated by the APTA Workforce Task Force, which has created supply and demand scenarios based on rates of attrition and other factors.


    Comments

    you can find good and hardworking Physical Therapists in the Philippines who are either under employed or unemployed. If ever they are employed, they are overworked and under paid. Honestly, the Philippine Physical Therapists needs your help.
    Posted by norman o. kaniteng jr. on 12/18/2013 12:02 AM
    What about debt to income ratio? I am happy that our profession continues to grow, providing care to more people in need, but many physical therapists struggle with large student loans.
    Posted by Brian on 12/24/2013 8:59 AM
    The projected future need for Physical Therapy services is difficult to dispute. The real question is whether the reimbursement for those services will be sufficiently there. Especially at this time of increasing educational costs and salary expectations to cover that debt. The cost/benefit margin is narrowing to the point where the profession will lose exceptional candidates.
    Posted by Tom on 12/24/2013 1:56 PM
    There is also lack of recognition financially for those that pursue professional advancement.
    Posted by Liz on 1/9/2014 5:45 PM
    Things are very important to inform people of the importance and the role of physical therapy in various diseases, especially the use of television programs the fastest growing among the people. For example in Egypt We do not have special programs for the definition of physical therapy and its importance. So the background of most of the people about the role of physical therapy is not enough. I suggest the existence of a global television program and not just a local for definition of physical therapy and its importance As well as providing jobs for physiotherapist
    Posted by Esraa Hany Rostom on 1/14/2014 4:57 PM
    Philippine PT 's do not come to USA with same training. they pass a test that is not the same as clinical experience. They pay for education far less than USA PT students. they do no have the student loan. In 5? Years they live better than a USA graduate .
    Posted by Loma Linda on 2/26/2014 11:13 PM
    I think the work force here represents the total number of both the PTs and PTAs. Unless, a PT has the money to set up his own clinic and lobby with the consultant doctors in USA, I do not see a future. I have been working in the field for 7 long years but everywhere, I see the trend is to have more PTAs and have a very few PTs just to do the evaluation. Most corporates do not even require a discharge by a PT if it is a Medicare part A patient or managed care patient. I thought of this a noble profession when I started PT course not and that is why I did not become a physician...but the way some of the corporates and their managers treat you, seems like it would have been better if you were a taxi driver.No respects from the nurses or most of the other medical professionals...I am already thinking of starting a business or something completely different.A Physician assistant gets lot more respect and treated like a doctor. If someone wants quick big money, PTA is the best option. 2 years course and they can earn between 25-31 USD per hour..but a PT gets 37-43 USD/hour. Why that extra 5 years of study and expense? Anyway, APTA need to work harder to protect our dignity as professionals if they really care about this profession. My brother has a bachelor in IT and he gets 150 grands a year and works only 4 days a week and gets probably 45 paid days off...and I have to fight for my 18 paid days off with all the seniority in the profession.And of course, no raise in pay for last three years.My employer doe not even do any annual reviews.
    Posted by Shaun Choudhury on 5/3/2014 12:01 PM
    @Shaun Choudhury, I am curious to the area of the U.S. you live/work in. I do not see many of the situations you bring forth. At least not enough to write off this profession as a career possibility. Also, The reason someone might rather become a PT over a PTA, according to your figures, could be a difference of about $25k/year. That's a pretty sizable difference in my book. That's a four year break even if your DPT cost 100k. Many programs in my area, the northeast, cost around 90k. Even the best hardworking PTA's top out rather quickly. And if you're willing to relocate or travel, you can make significantly more as a PT. But I see what you are saying though. Basically, if you want to be a PT, it needs to be more than just about the money. If you don't have a passion for it, then I wouldn't recommend it. But that's how most things are aren't they. BTW, I also know people in IT who make big money, 150-200K. But it is rare, rare, rare. Most of those guys are more business savvy than anything.
    Posted by Dave on 8/14/2014 3:20 PM
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