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    PT's Movie Review on ESPN Also Educates on Consecutive TBI

    An APTA member's review of a new documentary on traumatic brain injury (TBI) has been featured on ESPN. Stephania Bell, PT, CSCS, OCS, senior writer for ESPN, gave a strong, positive review for the new documentary "The Crash Reel," but perhaps just as important, seized the opportunity to provide readers with valuable education on consecutive TBI and its impact on developing brains.

    "The Crash Reel" follows the rise, devastating injury, and recovery of elite snowboarder Kevin Pearce, who at age 22 suffered a head injury during training for the 2010 Vancouver Olympics. Pearce's recovery continues, and he is now a motivational speaker and sports equipment consultant. Earlier this month he carried the torch at the opening ceremonies of the Winter Olympics in Sochi.

    In her review, Bell writes that "the film's strengths lie in its simultaneous beauty and tragedy. Stunning visual elements … and the inspirational love of an amazing family are contrasted with … the raw, often gut-wrenching emotions evoked alongside the physical pain of head injuries." She describes the film as an honest work that "neither glorifies nor glamorizes Kevin's brain injury and his subsequent path."

    Bell expands her review to include a discussion on some of the issues at the heart of "The Crash Reel," including wide misunderstanding of concussion, and the dangers of consecutive TBI. She explains the ways in which brain injuries differ from other injuries associated with sports, and how consecutive TBI can impact decision-making abilities that need to be keen in order to avoid another injury. In Pearce's case, he believes that symptoms from a previous concussion may have contributed to the injury that would end his snowboarding career.

    "The Crash Reel" is available on DVD, iTunes, and video-on-demand services and is being screened in selected theatres. More information can be found on the film's website.


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