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  • The Good Stuff: Members and the Profession in Local News, April 2017

    "The Good Stuff," is an occasional series that highlights recent, mostly local media coverage of physical therapy and APTA members, with an emphasis on good news and stories of how individual PTs and PTAs are transforming health care and society every day. Enjoy!

    PTs and RA: Kimberly Steinbarger, PT, on how physical therapy can help combat rheumatoid arthritis (US News and World Report)

    "Why post-injury physical therapy is never optional:" Eric Dube, PT, DPT, a US Ski Team PT, on the importance of careful therapy no matter the severity of injury (Summit County, Colorado, Daily)

    What Trump's budget proposal would do to science: Amy Arundale PT, DPT, and Stuart Binder-Macleod, PT, PhD, on the potential effects to research in the Delaware-Maryland-Virginia region (Delaware Online)

    Blood flow restriction, unrestricted: Bill Koch PT, DPT, on the prevalence of blood flow restriction therapy, and what the approach can do (KSTP5, St. Paul, Minnesota)

    PT students help their community: California State University-Northbridge PT students participated in a community program to help individuals with limb loss find new independence (CSUN Today)

    Let me ask you equestrian: Kristine Corn, PT, DPT, on integrating horseback riding into her physical therapy practice (Comstock's magazine)

    Physical therapy meets talk radio: Ian Hover PT, MTC, and Bob Oakeson PT, covered a range of topics related to physical therapy on "Successful Aging," a local radio talk show (Glendale, Arizona, Star)

    Getting back to exercise—safely: John Gallucci, PT, DPT, on avoiding injury when returning to physical activity (WPIX 11, New York)

    A clinic goes to the dogs: Jeremy Trevis, PT, DPT, on the use of therapy dogs during physical therapy sessions (Fox21 News, Duluth, Minnesota)

    Inspired to pursue physical therapy: Zach Dochnahl, PT student, on how his military service in Afghanistan inspired him to pursue a career as a PT (Veterans of Foreign Wars "Sport Clips Help a Hero" feature story)

    Pelvic floor weakness: Ruth Maher, PT, DPT, PhD, on pelvic floor physical therapy (Cork, Ireland, Irish Examiner)

    Rockin' the 'stache: Steve Schwegel, PT, on the "Mustache March 4PD" event he founded to support local police (Alton, Illinois, Riverbender)

    No slouch when it comes to posture advice: Karena Wu, PT, on the effectiveness of posture apps and devices (Fox2, St. Louis, Missouri)

    The mane point is mobility: Carrie Smith, PT, on her use of horses in physical therapy (Dubois County, Indiana, Herald)

    Mansplaining-free zone: Lauren Alpert-Zeunik PT, DPT, on the ways in which women working in sports are underestimated (Northeastern Illinois University Independent)

    Helping in Guatemala: Temple University PT students will participate in the annual Hearts in Motion trip (The Temple News)

    Dry needling: Joe Donnelly PT, DPT, and Elaine Jones, PT, on the hows and whys of dry needling and the importance of putting the patient first (WABE FM, Atlanta)

    Spring fitness advice: Robert Gillanders, PT, DPT, on making changes to exercise routines (Tampa Bay Times)

    This painkiller is no better than placebo for sciatica: lead researcher Chris Maher, PT, DPT, on a study that calls the use of pregabalin (commonly known as Lyrica) into question (The Washington Post)

    "Sure enough [my PT] started working, she hit on this spot on my back and I could feel the muscle in my head [that was the source of chronic headaches]" – John Moore, a patient who sought physical therapy instead of pain medications for treatment of pain (Nashville Tennessean)

    Got some good stuff? Let us know. Send a link to troyelliott@apta.org.

    Free Webinar for PTAs Focuses on the Value of APTA Membership

    Physical therapist assistants (PTAs) have a critical role to play—both in health care and in APTA. That's why the association is reaching out to all PTAs to show how APTA membership can improve their patient care, enhance their careers, and bring them closer to their professional peers.

    Coming Wednesday, April 19: a free live webinar that will provide an overview of all that APTA has to offer PTAs, a group critical to the future of the association. The session will cover everything from professional development, to advocacy, to the ways chapters and specialty sections can deepen the member experience. The 30-minute session will begin at 7:00 pm ET. Current APTA members should login and nonmembers should create a free account to register for the webinar.

    Speakers include Michael Chevalier, PTA, program specialist for APTA's Commission on Accreditation in Physical Therapy Education (CAPTE); Amy Smith, PTA, chief delegate of APTA's PTA Caucus; Mandy Frohlich, APTA executive vice present for public affairs; and Derek Stepp, director of postprofessional credentialing, which includes APTA's PTA recognition programs.

    The presentation is part of the #APTA100K initiative, an effort to reach the 100,000-member mark. As part of the campaign, those who join or renew by May 31, 2017, are eligible for a free registration to either the upcoming NEXT Conference and Exposition, June 21-24, in Boston; or the National Student Conclave, set for October 19-21 in Portland, Oregon. Those who join or renew by the deadline will also be entered into a drawing for one of 100 $100 gift cards to be given away (see official rules).

    2017 APTA Honors and Award Recipients Announced

    APTA’s national awards program has announced the 2017 full list of recipients (.pdf) of recognition for outstanding contributions to the physical therapy profession.

    This year, honorees include 15 newly named Catherine Worthingham Fellows as well as 13 recipients of the Lucy Blair Service Award. APTA also will be recognizing award recipients for their excellence across the domains of education, practice, service, publications, research, and academic achievement.

    Recipients will be recognized at the Honors and Awards Ceremony on Thursday, June 22, during the 2017 NEXT Conference and Exposition in Boston, Massachusetts, with a reception immediately following the ceremony. The 2018 recipient of the Mary McMillan Lecture Award will also be revealed during the ceremony. Family, friends, colleagues, and conference attendees are encouraged to attend this important event to support and honor these members’ achievements and contributions to the profession.

    Nominations for the 2018 Honors and Awards Program will open on September 1, 2017.

    From PT in Motion: PTs and Patient Support Groups

    Treating several patients with the same diagnosis or similar mobility challenges? Maybe some introductions are in order.

    This month in PT in Motion magazine: an exploration of how physical therapists (PTs) are facilitating patient support groups. The basic idea is fairly simple: patients can benefit from getting to know and interact with others facing similar challenges. But as the article shows, bringing people together creates a range of additional benefits.

    The article touches on several ways that PTs are leading or facilitating this kind of personal interaction, including a support and exercise group for people with osteoporosis, a group for individuals with Parkinson disease (PD); a physical therapy clinic that works with a variety of employer-based groups, and a group for individuals with limb loss. Along the way, readers get a perspective from researchers and group participants themselves, and can check out tips on starting a group.

    The PTs interviewed for the story come at their group experiences with different priorities and work in different ways to empower their groups. But all share a similar perspective on the benefits of groups: they benefit patients, they're a great way for everyone—including the PT—to learn from each other, and it's an approach well within the PT's wheelhouse.

    And groups help to spread the word on what PTs can do for patients, according to Rose Babcock, PT, DPT, who runs the PD group.

    "[Support groups] help build dialogue and trust," Babcock tells PT in Motion. "The folks within my support group come back to me for physical therapy whenever they need it."

    "The Value of Patients Sharing Experiences" is featured in the April issue of PT in Motion magazine and is open to all viewers—pass it along to nonmember colleagues to show them 1 of the benefits of belonging to APTA. Printed editions of the magazine are mailed to all members who have not opted out; digital versions are available online to members.

    APTA to Form Centennial Steering Committee

    Let the countdown begin.

    With APTA set to turn 100 in 2021, the association is getting the wheels turning—not just on how the anniversary will be celebrated but also on what the organization will be when it gets there.

    The approach will involve a combination of activities, including the formation of a 7-member steering committee selected by the APTA Board of Directors to begin strategizing on the ways APTA might mark its centennial. The Board will base its selections on a national scan of qualified candidates, including a review of those in the Volunteer Interest Pool as of April 12.

    But according to APTA President Sharon Dunn, PT, PhD, there's more to think about than celebrations.

    "Beginning this year, we want to use our coming anniversary as a way to consider where we want APTA to be in 2021," said Dunn. "And it's not just about identifying a destination—we want members to think about the path we take to reach that destination, and how to develop the operational and physical infrastructure that will make it possible."

    "Our profession has a proud past and an exciting future, and we have a professional association powered by engaged members pursuing a common vision," Dunn said. "Now's the time to capitalize on those assets to make our centennial a real milestone."

    The Good Stuff: Members and the Profession in Local News, March 2017

    "The Good Stuff," is an occasional series that highlights recent, mostly local media coverage of physical therapy and APTA members, with an emphasis on good news and stories of how individual PTs and PTAs are transforming health care and society every day. Enjoy!

    Marie MacDonald, SPT, and Colten Foster, SPT, helped a woman with brain cancer complete a half-marathon. (WFAA 8 TV, Dallas)

    Caitlin McGee, PT, DPT, describes her role as physical therapist for professional eSports players. (thecomeback.com)

    "For many chronic low back pain issues, physical therapy is often helpful to correct muscle imbalances and prevent future problems." - "What's Really Making Your Back Hurt?" (KRMG News 102.3 FM, Tulsa, Oklahoma)

    Cole Galloway, PT, PhD, shares the latest GoBabyGo initiatives. (University of Delaware Daily)

    Luke Smith, PT, DPT, explains how bleeding disorders can affect injuries. (Philadelphia Inquirer)

    "Jobs for physical [therapist] assistants increased 13% over the past five years. About 15% of the 87,000 people working in this field are younger than 24, and they earn an average wage of $26.59 per hour ($55,307 per year)." – "The 15 Best Jobs for Young People All Pay at Least $40,000" (Huffington Post)

    Pablo Mleziva, PT, DPT, describes how increasing movement and strength can decrease pain and speed recovery after injury or surgery. (Loma Linda University, California, Health News)

    University of the Pacific PT students participated in the Pacific Family Health Fair, an event that offers free health screenings to underserved populations. (Stockton, California, recordnet.com)

    Brittany Lynch, PT, explains the importance of cross-training for runners. (Western Pennsylvania Tribune-Review)

    Carol Oatis, PT, PhD, has been awarded a $148,000 grant to research how physical therapy plays a role in TKR surgery. (Arcadia University, Pennsylvania, News)

    Joe Siracusano, PT, is part of an innovative pain treatment program in Omaha, Nebraska. (KETV 7, Omaha)

    North Iowa Area Physical Therapist Assistant Club helps out with the Shoes for Kids effort. (KIMT TV, Mason City, Iowa)

    Got some good stuff? Let us know. Send a link to troyelliott@apta.org.

    The Latest at PTJ: New Technology, New Access, and a Packed Issue

    As the publishing partnership between Physical Therapy (PTJ), APTA's science journal, and Oxford University Press (OUP) continues, readers are seeing some changes in delivery and access systems. One thing that won't change: PTJ's commitment to highlighting the best in physical therapy research and thoughtful analysis relevant to the profession. And the February issue now online is no exception.

    Check out a couple of recent changes at PTJ, and take a quick look at what's hot in the February issue.

    Access to PTJ
    Since PTJ's move to its new website home on the OUP platform in January, all PTJ content has been freely accessible to the public. Beginning March 1, access to articles published within the past 12 months will be restricted to members and subscribers unless the articles are open access. Here's how members and subscribers can access articles:

    • From APTA's home page: Under the "News and Publications" tab, click on PTJ, which will take you to the PTJ website. When you click on member-protected content, scroll below the abstract, look for the APTA logo, and “Sign in via society site.” You will be prompted to log in with your APTA member username and password; then click to continue, and navigate to your articles of interest. You only have to login once per visit.
    • From PTJ's website: Go to https://academic.oup.com/ptj. When you click on member-protected content, scroll below the abstract, look for the APTA logo, and “Sign in via society site.” You will be prompted to log in with your APTA member username and password; then click to continue, and navigate to your articles of interest. You only have to login once per visit.

    PTJ mobile app
    Originally, the PTJ mobile app served as a kind of bridge between the journal proper and readers who wanted to access content on a smartphone or other device, with the app reformatting articles in ways that worked on smaller screens. Among the changes that came with the PTJ-OUP partnership is a redesigned PTJ website that automatically adapts to whatever device a reader might use. As a result, PTJ has discontinued the separate app.

    February highlights
    Do you really think 28 days is enough to contain all that PTJ has to offer in a month? Not a chance. Even though March is upon us, the February issue is still being featured, and for good reason—in case you missed it, there's some fascinating reading to be had, with a little something for everyone. Such as:

    Stay tuned for the March issue of PTJ sometime later this month.

    From PT in Motion: The Role of PTs and PTAs in Healthy Aging

    Unlike R-rated movie admission, voting, and senior discounts at restaurants, the aging process isn't something that happens after you reach a magic-number birthday. It begins the moment you do.

    Or as Mindy Renfro, PT, PhD, puts it: "Children, 20 year olds, 50 year olds—everyone's aging. There's no way around it." The key, of course, is for individuals to move through the aging process in good health, which includes staying as active and mobile as possible to meet the physical challenges that can arise in later years. And according to a recent article in PT in Motion magazine, that's where physical therapists (PTs) and physical therapist assistants (PTAs) can play a crucial role.

    "Preparing for Old(er) Age" in the February issue of PT in Motion explores the reasons PTs and PTAs are the ideal health care providers to help the public understand how the aging process works, and the steps to stay healthy throughout life.

    According to the PTs interviewed for the story—including 2016 McMillan lecturer Carole Lewis, PT, DPT, PhD—1 of the biggest impediments to healthy aging is society's attitude about what it means to age. "We have a lot of misconceptions and prejudices about the potential of people who are older," Lewis says in the article.

    Mike Studer, PT, MHS, echoes Lewis's sentiment.

    "A lot of myths need to be debunked about what normal aging really is," Studer is quoted as saying. "And we as physical therapists—the 'movement experts'—should be out there leading the way."

    "Preparing for Old(er) Age" is featured in the February issue of PT in Motion magazine and is now available to all viewers—pass it along to nonmember colleagues to show them 1 of the benefits of belonging to APTA. Printed editions of the magazine are mailed to all members who have not opted out; digital versions are available online to members.

    The Good Stuff: Members and the Profession in Local News, February 2017

    "The Good Stuff" is an occasional series that highlights recent, mostly local media coverage of physical therapy and APTA members, with an emphasis on good news and stories of how individual PTs and PTAs are transforming health care and society every day. Enjoy!

    Cristin Beazley, PT, describes the need for baseline concussion testing among youth athletes, and shares an innovative program to do just that in partnership between Sheltering Arms Hospital and FC Richmond, Virginia. (Richmond Times-Dispatch)

    Sheila Klausner, PT, MS, offers tips on how to become a runner. (Apopka, Florida Voice)

    Viral video: Hunter Christ, PT, uses zydeco dancing to get his patient moving. (KATC3, Denham Springs, Louisiana)

    William Carey University (MS) PT students help with cleanup after a devastating tornado. (WDAM7, Moselle, Mississippi)

    Robyn Wilhelm PT, DPT, discusses the role physical therapy can play in treating pelvic floor dysfunction. (Shape magazine)

    PT students at Central Michigan University joined with med students to explore ways to work together to improve treatment services. (Mt. Pleasant, Michigan Morning Sun)

    PTJ Editor in Chief Alan Jette, PT, PhD, FAPTA, discusses the future of the journal. (Oxford University Press blog)

    Sarah Morrison, PT, MBA, MHA, takes over as CEO of The Shepherd Center. (Atlanta Journal-Constitution)

    California State University-Long Beach PT students donate adaptive tricycles. (Long Beach, California Post)

    Marilyn Moffat, PT, DPT, PhD, FAPTA, explains the ways exercise can help individuals with Parkinson disease. (New York Times)

    Got some good stuff? Let us know. Send a link to troyelliott@apta.org.

    2017 NEXT Registration Opens

    Groundhog-based prognostication aside, spring is in fact right around the corner and June isn't far behind, which means APTA's NEXT Conference and Exposition is getting ready to arrive on the scene in Boston, Massachusetts.

    APTA has opened up registration for NEXT, set for June 21-24. Again this year, NEXT is shaping up to be a can't-miss event, where the profession's thought leaders and experts come together to offer programming with an emphasis on interactivity and direct engagement.

    Programming highlights for 2017 include sessions on clinical reasoning, creative mobility technology, generational perspectives, and mindfulness in pain treatment. In addition to all the new topics, attendees can still expect annual favorites such as the McMillan and Maley lectures, and the almost-too-much-fun-for-a-conference Oxford Debate, returning to celebrate its 10-year anniversary.

    It all adds up to an event that will ignite your passion for the profession. Register today and experience NEXT 2017 for yourself.

    Think we're just making this stuff up? We're not. Check out news and video from the 2016 NEXT  for a taste of what you missed.