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  • Study: Knee, Hip OA May Increase Risk of CVD-Related Death, Underscoring Need for Emphasis on Physical Activity in OA Treatment

    In this review: Cause-specific mortality in osteoarthritis of peripheral joints
    (Osteoarthritis and Cartilage, June 2019)
    Abstract

    The message
    Researchers from Sweden found that among individuals studied, those with hip or knee osteoarthritis (OA) died from chronic ischemic heart diseases and heart failure at a greater rate than both the non-OA population and those with OA in other peripheral joints. No other significant correlations were found between the presence of OA and other causes of death, including diabetes, dementia, neoplasms, or diseases of the digestive system.

    The study
    Researchers tracked 469,512 health records from individuals in southern Sweden who were between the ages of 25 and 84 in 2003, including individuals who received an OA diagnosis between 1998 and 2003. Authors of the study then compared causes of death among the OA and non-OA group reported over an 11-year span, from 2004 to 2014. The researchers wanted to find out the degree to which the presence of OA in a peripheral joint (or joints) increased the hazard risk for various individual causes of death.

    Findings

    • Among all individuals studied, the most common causes of death were neoplasms and cardiovascular diseases (CVD), accounting for 66% of all deaths.
    • Compared with the non-hip/knee OA groups, those with hip OA were 1.13 times as likely to die from CVD, while the knee OA group was found to be 1.16 times as likely to die from CVD. Those differences increased as the individuals aged.
    • The CVD-related deaths among the hip and knee OA groups were primarily related to heart failure and ischemic heart disease, and rates didn't differ significantly between men, women, and when adjusted for other demographic variables.
    • Researchers found no correlation between OA and other causes of death studied: diabetes, hypertension, cerebrovascular disease, neoplasm, dementia, and liver disease.
    • Among the knee OA group, 26% underwent knee replacement during the study period. Of the hip OA group, 55% had a joint replacement procedure; however, the mortality results were similar even when both replacement groups were excluded from the hazard ratio analysis.

    Why it matters
    The bulk of research related to OA and causes of death tend to focus on all-cause mortality. This large-scale study took a more granular approach to identify possible relationships between types of OA and specific causes of death. Authors believe the findings further underscore the importance of emphasizing physical activity in the treatment of OA.

    What APTA's doing
    APTA is a strong supporter of the importance of physical activity in the treatment of OA. The association offers resources on encouraging healthy, active lifestyles at APTA's Prevention, Wellness, and Disease Management webpage as well as information on arthritis management through community programs. Members also can dive deeper into the issues by joining APTA's Council on Prevention, Health Promotion, and Wellness in Physical Therapy, and by checking out evidence-based resources such as this clinical practice guidelines on hip pain mobility deficits, available at the association's PTNow website. Patient-focused resources are available through APTA's MoveForwardPT.com website; additionally the Osteoarthritis Action Alliance offers a free booklet to help consumers participate in its "Walk With Ease" program.

    Keep in mind…
    Researchers were unable to adjust for body mass, a factor related to both the presence of OA and higher all-cause mortality. Additionally, the individuals with OA included those at all stages of the disease, and were limited to those who received an OA diagnosis—authors acknowledge it's likely that the non-OA group included individuals with undiagnosed OA.

    Research-related stories featured in PT in Motion News are intended to highlight a topic of interest only and do not constitute an endorsement by APTA. For synthesized research and evidence-based practice information, visit the association's PTNow website.

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