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  • The Good Stuff: Members and the Profession in the Media, May 2019

    "The Good Stuff" is an occasional series that highlights recent media coverage of physical therapy and APTA members, with an emphasis on good news and stories of how individual PTs and PTAs are transforming health care and society every day. Enjoy!

    Heard the one about the PT? Kyle Gadapee, SPT, was among the comedians featured in the 10th Annual Women in Comedy Festival sponsored by HBO. (St Johnsbury, Vermont, Caledonian Record)

    The dangers of neck-cracking explained: In the wake of headlines about a man who suffered a stroke while trying to crack his neck, Rob Sillevis, PT, DPT, PhD, shows just how it could happen. (NBC News2, Fort Meyers, Florida)

    Quotable: "Surely physical therapy is about healing and recovery, but for anyone with a physical disability—it is more about creating realistic ways to move toward wellness and away from pain and illness on a daily basis." -Katy Fetters, Colorado University-Boulder graduate student with cerebral palsy, on how physical therapy is helping her stay physically active. (CU Boulder Today)

    Physical therapy and engineering: Rachael Biega, SPT, describes her experiences working with engineering students on developing adaptive devices. (phys.org)

    Back to physical therapy: Todd Kruse, PT, MPT, makes the case for trying physical therapy first for back pain. (KEYC12, Mankato, Minnesota)

    Best in snow: Dave Callaghan, PT, has received a National Appointment from the National Ski Patrol. (UPMatters.com)

    Prepping for Archie: Marianne Ryan, PT, BS, provides insight on how Meghan Markle and other expectant moms can prepare for labor. (Fox News)

    Feel better in the long run: Marsena Morgan, PT, DPT, offers tips on recovering after running a marathon. (Fox25 News, Oklahoma City)

    Pelvic floor health: Holly Tanner, PT, DPT, MA, stresses the importance of seeking help from a PT for pelvic floor problems. (Today Show)

    Taking the pain out of paying for physical therapy: Denise Buher, PT, DPT, explains how high copays are depriving patients of the physical therapy they need. (Glen Falls, New York, Post-Star)

    Spreading the interprofessional message: Jody Frost, PT, DPT, PhD, FAPTA, has been named president of the National Academies of Practice. (napractice.org)

    The endurance PT: Verrelle Wyatt, PT, DPT, took first place in the 2019 Pro Football Hall of Fame Marathon. (Akron, Ohio, Beacon Journal)

    Your IT: Bridget Dungan, PT, offers advice on how cyclists can avoid IT band-related pain. (Bicycling)

    Quotable: "They helped me strengthen my legs and prepare for this. They had some steps that I practiced going up and down so I could be able to handle the steps," – Margaret Planter, who participated in physical therapy to prepare her for ziplining on her 100th birthday. (Local12 News, Cincinnati)

    Adaptive triathlon: Jeff Krug, PT, and Kayla Friesen, SPT, share their experiences in helping to oversee an adaptive triathlon sponsored by Missouri University's physical therapy program. (Columbia, Missouri, Missourian)

    Getting hip to getting strong: Doug Kechijian, PT, DPT, suggests exercises to help build hip strength and resilience. (Outside)

    When your jumping's jacked: Keaton Ray, PT, DPT, ATC, covers the proper way to do jumping jacks. (Women's Health)

    Living with Parkinson: Kari Torgerson, PT, outlines the physical and emotional toll of Parkinson disease. (It Takes Two podcast)

    Help for sciatica: Jason Dudzic, PT, MSPT, explains how physical therapy can make a difference for individuals experiencing sciatic nerve pain. (CBS21 News, Harrisburg, Pennsylvania)

    Raising the barre: Rebecca Strabala, PT, has combined her background in dance with her training as a PT to help dancers recover from injury. (Davenport, Iowa, Gazette)

    Quotable: "Physical therapy was once something that seemed pointless for me to try. My arms and legs are pretty much just for show, so why bother? Now, I’m grateful for how persistent my doctor was with me a few years ago. The thing that I once dreaded is now something that I eagerly anticipate every week." –Kevin Schaefer, who has spinal muscle atrophy, on how regular aquatic physical therapy sessions have changed his outlook. (SMA News Today)

    Got some good stuff? Let us know. Send a link to troyelliott@apta.org.