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  • The Good Stuff: Members and the Profession in the Media, June 2018

    "The Good Stuff," is an occasional series that highlights recent media coverage of physical therapy and APTA members, with an emphasis on good news and stories of how individual PTs and PTAs are transforming health care and society every day. Enjoy!

    A (motor) learning experience: Mike Studer PT, MHS, outlines innovative ways to apply motor learning principles to rehabilitation. (The Perception & Action Podcast)

    No ordinary rehab: At her clinic, Patrice Hazan, PT, DPT, oversees a model of physical therapy that employs functional wellness classes. (Greenville, South Carolina, News)

    Quotable: "The cornerstone of treatment should be physical therapy." – Huaiyu Tan, MD, rehabilitation physician, on shifting away from the overuse of opioids in pain treatment. (Pensacola, Florida, News-Journal)

    Much-kneeded research: Jay Irrgang, PT, PhD, FAPTA, is leading a study aimed at finding the most effective physical therapy approach for people 45 and older with both osteoarthritis and a meniscal tear. (Pittsburgh Post-Gazette)

    The net benefits of physical activity: Allie Muller, SPT; Tara Dorenkamp, SPT, and other students from the Creighton University (Nebraska) physical therapist program joined with the CU men's basketball team to host a basketball camp for children with disabilities. (Live Well Nebraska)

    Quotable: "I believe that no matter what age you are, you have the ability to change your habits and turn back the hands of time. Maybe not the hour hands, but certainly the minutes. Well, my physical therapist believes that, and I believe her, so I am on a new journey." Column by Fred Goldenberg, who's making a commitment to get back in shape with the help of his PT. (Traverse City, Michigan Record-Eagle)

    Water you waiting for: Carol Oatis, PT, PhD, shares her perspective on the advantages of water-based exercise. (Consumer Reports)

    All in the family: Heather Dragg, PT, is working with a very special patient—her grandmother, Marolyn Dragg, PT, who opened the clinic now run by Heather. (Ardmore, Oklahoma, Daily Armoreite)

    Man up and do Pilates: Rachel Tavel PT, DPT, explains why Pilates shouldn't be considered solely a "woman thing." (Men's Health)

    Walking with technology: Kim Kobata, PT, describes how her clinic is using robotic technology to help a patient walk. (KOMO News, Seattle)

    Stretching out the possibilities: Karen Joubert, PT DPT; and Scott Weiss, PT, explore the pros and cons of assisted stretch classes. (Shape)

    Helping a miracle happen: Mandy Alaniz, PT, talks about the recovery of Julian Maldonado, age 8, who experienced a severe abdominal infection that resulted in the loss of his leg. (KIIITV3, Corpus Christi, Texas)

    New moms and exercise: Carrie Pagliano PT, DPT, explains the factors that should be considered by new mothers wanting to know how soon after birth they can return to exercise.(whattoexpect.com)

    Watch how you watch: Jean Weaver PT, MBA, offers postural advice for tv binge-watchers. (Consumer Reports)

    Quotable: "I wish that my parents had made me stick with my physical therapy. If Mom and Dad tell you that you should go three days a week until you’re 18, please, listen to them. It will help with so many complications once you’re an adult and you’ll get into a routine that will help you live your best life later on." –Kristen Parisi, who, at age 6, was involved in a car accident that paralyzed her from the waist down, on "what I wish I could tell my 6-year-old self about living with a disability." (Today.com)

    Got some good stuff? Let us know. Send a link to troyelliott@apta.org.

    Don't Miss Out: 4 Events at NEXT You Have to See for Yourself

    With APTA's 2018 NEXT Conference and Exposition now less than a month away, it's time to start making the tough decisions about your trip to Orlando. No, we're not talking about nailing down how many pairs of flip flops to pack and trying to figure out whether sunscreen can actually expire (it can, btw, so please be careful). We're talking about which sessions and events to attend once you arrive for the June 27-30 event.

    With hundreds of options to choose from, it won't be easy. But there are 4 events—2 lectures, 1 panel discussion, and 1, well…something else—that should be on your "can't miss" list.

    Luckily, PT in Motion News breaks it down.

    What: The 49th Mary McMillan Lecture—Wisdom and Courage: Doing the Right Thing
    When: Thursday, June 28, 10:00 am–11:00 am
    Why it's a can't-miss: One-of-a-kind inspiration and education from a physical therapy thought leader

    First and foremost, being named a McMillan lecturer is one of the most distinguished honors that APTA confers, so you know that you'll be hearing from an individual who has made a mark on the profession. This year's lecturer is no exception: Laurita M. Hack, PT, DPT, PhD, MBA, FAPTA, is a leader and former APTA Board of Directors secretary who has focused on some of the most foundational elements of the physical therapy profession, including the development of clinical expertise and physical therapy education. Hack will explore the complexities of decision-making in a profession that aims to transform society, from the elements of cognitive psychology that help explain how decisions are formulated to the challenges involved in actually carrying out the decisions we make. Decide to attend.

    What: 2018 Rothstein Roundtable—Physical Therapy Decreases Opioid Use: What Will It Take to Change Policy?
    When: Friday, June 29, 8:00 am–9:30 am
    Why it's a can't miss: Smart and lively exchange on challenges and opportunities facing the profession from people who know a thing or two

    The event's namesake, Jules Rothstein, was known for his love of thoroughly exploring (some might say arguing) all sides of an idea. The Rothstein Roundtable lives up to that reputation by bringing together a diverse panel of experts—some physical therapists, some from other professions—for a conversation on some of the big issues in the profession. Not everyone agrees with each other, but that's part of what makes for great discussions. Moderator Anthony Delitto, PT, PhD, FAPTA, keeps the panelists on their toes by asking provocative questions at just the right time, and then stepping back and letting them have at it. This year's topic: How can the profession use data supporting physical therapy's role in decreasing opioid use to actually change health care policy?

    What: The 23rd John H.P. Maley Lecture—Lifecourse Health Development of Individuals With Chronic Health Conditions: Visualizing a Preferred Future
    When: Friday, June 29, 10:00 am–11:00 am
    Why it's a can't-miss: Insights on emerging trends and perspectives in physical therapy that you won't hear anywhere else

    The Maley lectures are delivered by speakers who have made significant contributions to clinical practice in the physical therapy profession, and they have covered everything from pain management to wearable technologies. This year the topic is an expansive one: "lifecourse health development," an emerging model that embraces nonlinear, person-in-environment concepts related to working with individuals with chronic health conditions. The lecturer, Robert Palisano, PT, ScD, FAPTA, senior editor of Physical Therapy for Children, has been instrumental in developing and applying this model in physical therapy through research, teaching, and writing. He will describe the model in the context of physical therapy and discuss innovative roles for physical therapists and physical therapist assistants in the future.

    What: The Oxford Debate—Is Good Nutrition the New Tradition?
    When: Friday, June 29, 5:00 pm–6:00 pm
    What it's a can't miss: Just…trust us. You've got to see this.

    Imagine bringing together 2 opposing teams of renowned physical therapists and physical therapist assistants to engage in a thoughtful, respectful debate about a challenging issue in the physical therapy profession. Now imagine the complete opposite of that, and you're getting close to the NEXT Oxford Debate experience.

    Sure, the renowned debaters are onstage, and, yes, there's a topic and opposing teams, but that's where the similarities end. Watch otherwise highly regarded professionals compete for your support by engaging in all manner of behavior that can include song, dance, skits, costume-wearing, and other, more…let's just say undefinable forms of performance, interspersed with an occasional point about the topic at hand. Your job as audience member is to support a team though noise-making and by physically moving from one side of the room to the other—and you're encouraged to change allegiances as often as you feel necessary to maintain the atmosphere of near-anarchy. Charles Ciccone, PT, PhD, FAPTA, serves as moderator and judge of the event while delivering jokes that you won't soon forget, regardless of whether you want to or not. The topic of this year's debate is whether the practice of physical therapy should incorporate nutrition as an essential part of patient and client management. The audience is bound to eat it up.

    Missed advance registration for NEXT? No worries: onsite registration will be available.

    2018 House of Delegates Motions, Background Papers Posted

    Now available to APTA members: the complete first packet of motions, accompanied by background papers, to be considered by the 2018 APTA House of Delegates (House) when it convenes June 25-27, 2018, in Orlando, Florida.
     
    Called "Packet I With Background Papers," the compilation contains 57 motions to the 2018 House of Delegates, including 4 bylaws amendments. This packet replaces "Packet I Preview." Besides minor editing and formatting changes and the addition of background papers, the new packet does not differ from the earlier version in any ways that affect the scope of motions.
     
    Proposed amendments to APTA bylaws are:

    • RC 53-18 Amend: Bylaws of the American Physical Therapy Association, Article VIII. House of Delegates, Section 3: Voting Delegates, A. Qualifications of Voting Delegates, (1) Chapter Delegates
    • RC 54-18 Amend: Bylaws of the American Physical Therapy Association, Article VIII. House of Delegates, Section 4: Nonvoting Delegates, A. Qualifications of Nonvoting Delegates, (1) Section Delegates
    • RC 55-18 Amend: Bylaws of the American Physical Therapy Association, Article VIII. House of Delegates, Section 4: Nonvoting Delegates, A. Qualifications of Nonvoting Delegates, (2) PTA Caucus Delegates
    • RC 56-18 Amend: Bylaws of the American Physical Therapy Association to Allow Sections to Vote in the House of Delegates

    Delegates wishing to amend a motion within Packet I With Background Papers should schedule a virtual Reference Committee appointment on Friday, June 8, or schedule an onsite appointment for Sunday, June 24 or Tuesday, June 26. For more information, refer to Make an Appointment with the RC found in the House Hub file library.
     
    Contact APTA's Justin Lini with any questions.

    PTs From the US Selected to Speak at International Physical Therapy Congress

    A total of 13 physical therapists (PTs) from the US will be among the main speakers at the World Confederation for Physical Therapy (WCPT) Congress to be held in Geneva May 10–13, 2019.

    The American PTs will contribute to focused symposia on a wide range of topics including education research, the application of evidence to individual patients, improving mobility of hospital patients, big data, cancer survivor rehabilitation, and diversity in physical therapy. Each focused symposium is organized by a convener who leads an international group of speakers through linked research-focused presentations. A complete list of all symposia is available at the WCPT Congress website.
     
    "There were some very difficult choices; however, we are proud to present the focused symposia that we believe represent the best possible combinations of a range of timely topics with relevance to clinicians, educators and researchers, delivered by excellent speakers from all over the world," said WCPT International Scientific Committee Chair Charlotte Häger in a press release.
    Details about the symposia and the program for WCPT Congress 2019 may be found at the WCPT congress webpage.

    The Good Stuff: Members and the Profession in the Media, May 2018

    "The Good Stuff," is an occasional series that highlights recent media coverage of physical therapy and APTA members, with an emphasis on good news and stories of how individual PTs and PTAs are transforming health care and society every day. Enjoy!

    Bravery, persistence, DPT: Brandon Hsu, SPT, faced down leukemia and chemotherapy-induced encephalopathy but never lost his passion for the profession. Now he's a newly minted DPT. (University of Southern California News)

    Pitching good posture: Judy Seto, PT, DPT, helped New York Mets pitcher Robert Gsellman correct bad postural habits made worse through video-gaming. (New York Times)

    From North Dakota to Peru—and back again: Sierra Steckler, PT, describes what it was like to provide physical therapist services in Peru. (Wahpeton, North Dakota, News-Monitor)

    When it's time to go: Carrie Pagliano, PT, DPT; and Laurie Kilmartin PT, DPT, offer advice to new and expecting moms on relieving constipation. (Parents)

    This is your PT speaking: Amanda Brick, PT, DPT, passes along tips for sitting comfortably on long airplane trips. (Bustle.com)

    Shinful behavior: Heather Moore, PT, provides guidance on exercises to ease and prevent shin splints. (Philadelphia Inquirer)

    Mix it up, parents: Shondell Jones, PT, DPT, stresses the importance of children engaging in a variety of physical activities and not focusing solely on 1 sport. (KWX-TV10, Waco, Texas)

    Crack your back? Just…don't: Jeffrey Yellin, PT, warns about the dangers of "unskilled" back-cracking. (Elite Daily)

    Blood flow restriction basics: John Corbo, PT, DPT, explains how blood flow restriction is used in physical therapy. (WCCO4, Minneapolis)

    Sole searching: Robert Gillanders, PT, DPT, discusses how finding the right shoe can reduce foot pain. (Self)

    Got some good stuff? Let us know. Send a link to troyelliott@apta.org.

    2017 APTA Annual Report Posted

    Now available: the 2017 APTA Annual Report, an e-published document that provides an overview of a year fueled by collaboration and marked by accomplishments in areas ranging from national public relations campaigns to membership milestones and the end of the hard cap on payment for rehabilitation services under Medicare.

    The report builds on a 2017 "year in review" released in December 2017. In addition to the contents of that publication, the report includes financial information, a treasurer's report, and membership statistics.

    "APTA's past year was impressive," writes APTA President Sharon Dunn, PT, PhD. "But even more impressive is the way we accomplished what we did—through a commitment to working together, sharing ideas, and learning from each other."

    2018 House of Delegates Motions Now Posted

    APTA members can now access the first official packet of motions that will be considered by the 2018 APTA House of Delegates (House) when it convenes June 25-27, 2018, in Orlando, Florida.

    Called "Packet 1 Preview," the compilation contains 57 motions to the 2018 House of Delegates and is provided as the official notice of all motions, including 4 bylaws amendments that are coming before the 2018 House of Delegates. On May 18, “Packet I Preview” will be replaced with a document titled “Packet I with Background Papers,” a further edited and formatted version of the preview packet that will also include background papers on various motions. The differences between the 2 packets will be editorial only, and will not affect the scope of the motions.

    Proposed amendments to APTA bylaws are:

    • RC 53-18 Amend: Bylaws of the American Physical Therapy Association, Article VIII. House of Delegates, Section 3: Voting Delegates, A. Qualifications of Voting Delegates, (1) Chapter Delegates
    • RC 54-18 Amend: Bylaws of the American Physical Therapy Association, Article VIII. House of Delegates, Section 4: Nonvoting Delegates, A. Qualifications of Nonvoting Delegates, (1) Section Delegates
    • RC 55-18 Amend: Bylaws of the American Physical Therapy Association, Article VIII. House of Delegates, Section 4: Nonvoting Delegates, A. Qualifications of Nonvoting Delegates, (2) PTA Caucus Delegates
    • RC 56-18 Amend: Bylaws of the American Physical Therapy Association to Allow Sections to Vote in the House of Delegates

    Delegates should continue using the Motions Discussion forum in the House of Delegates online Hub community to participate in discussion. Chief, section, and assembly delegates wishing to cosponsor a motion or request that a motion be placed on consent should visit the Motions, House Reports, and Background Papers file library.

    Contact APTA’s Cheryl Robinson with any questions.

    2018 APTA Honors and Awards Program Recipients Announced

    APTA's national awards program has announced the full 2018 list of recipients of recognition for their outstanding contributions to the physical therapy profession.

    The honorees include newly named Catherine Worthingham Fellows as well as recipients of the Lucy Blair Service Award. APTA also has announced recipients for 2 new award categories for societal impact and humanitarian efforts.

    Recipients will be recognized at the Honors and Awards Ceremony on Thursday, June 28, during the 2018 NEXT Conference and Exposition in Orlando, Florida, with a reception to follow. The winner of the Mary McMillan Lecture Award (lecture to be delivered in 2019) also will be announced. Family, friends, colleagues, and conference attendees are encouraged to attend this important event to support and honor these members’ achievements and contributions to the profession.

    Nominations for the 2019 Honors and Awards Program will open September 2018.

    APTA's Member Renewal Efforts Earn National Award

    APTA's successful efforts to keep membership strong have been recognized as a model for associations across the country.

    Earlier this month, the American Society of Association Executives (ASAE) announced that APTA’s multipronged initiative to retain members was selected as this year's Gold Circle award winner for outstanding member retention campaign. The campaign was part of #APTA100K, a larger APTA push to reach 100,000 members. The association reached that goal in summer of 2017.

    The award-winning program, "On-Time Renewal to #APTA100K," was supported by a range of offerings including webinars, free meeting registrations, personal visits and written contact, and a series of renewal "touchpoint" emails and online prompts that were user- and handheld-friendly. The result? Renewals increased, and overall membership grew at a rate APTA hadn't seen in 2 decades.

    "The #APTA100K membership campaign was truly an all-hands-on-deck effort that involved staff, volunteers, and components," said APTA CEO Justin Moore, PT, DPT. "More than just promoting the value of membership, we made membership easier through our new automated renewal reminders. This award is a wonderful recognition of those efforts, but it’s also a tribute to our association’s tremendous positive momentum and the value created by our more than 100,000 members."

    This isn't APTA's first Gold Circle award. Last year, ASAE recognized APTA's public service announcement video for its #ChoosePT campaign as the winner for best video of the year. According to ASAE, the awards recognize association initiatives that "set an example for associations developing their own campaigns."

    The Good Stuff: Members and the Profession in the Media, April 2018

    "The Good Stuff," is an occasional series that highlights recent media coverage of physical therapy and APTA members, with an emphasis on good news and stories of how individual PTs and PTAs are transforming health care and society every day. Enjoy!

    Oh baby! Josh Thorington PT, DPT, and his twin brother, Justin, have that whole twin vibe going on—right down to their wives giving birth on the same day in the same hospital. (Traverse City, Michigan, Record-Eagle)

    That's a stretch: Zachary Long, PT, DPT, explains why certain stretching exercises can help people with ankylosing spondylitis. (everydayhealth.com)

    Ready patient 1: Maureen Simmonds PT, PhD, is working with virtual reality in the treatment of back pain. (KSAT12 News, San Antonio, Texas)

    The benefits of a mourning run: Rachel Tavel PT, DPT, shares how running has helped her face her grief over the loss of her father. (Self magazine)

    Quotable: "Through aquatic physical therapy, I was able to get strong enough to regain my balance and coordination, and start walking without a walker." – Glastonbury, Connecticut, resident Christine Depierro-Gacek, in her remarks to the Glastonbury town council as the council debated the feasibility of a year-round aquatic center. (Hartford, Connecticut, Courant)

    A PT gets a "Chasing Genius" grant: Asha Gummadi, PT, was awarded a grant from National Geographic to pursue development of an app to help patients understand their exercises—offered in multiple languages. (Forbes.com)

    Illinois State University PT students do their part: The students, including Melissa Gifford, SPT, took part in a free health screenings program at the ISU health center. (Terre Haute, Indiana, Statesman)

    Don't run away from good form: Michael Roberts PT, DPT, outlines how musculoskeletal imbalances in one area of a runner's body can create pain in another area. (Milwaukee Journal Sentinel)

    The road to better pain management: Jill Boorman, PT, explains the importance of physical therapy in pain management. (Charleston, South Carolina, Post and Courier)

    Cloudy with a chance of injury: Karena Wu, PT, DPT, describes the physical challenges of running in heavy rain. (accuweather.com)

    Dry needling basics: Gerad Donahue, PT, DPT, breaks down the fundamentals of how dry needling works. (WXPR-FM, Rhinelander, Wisconsin)

    The play's the thing: Regina Harbourne PT, PhD, FAPTA, discusses the importance of play-based pediatric physical therapy. (WESA-FM, Pittsburgh)

    Wherefore art thou, orthotics? Robert Gillanders, PT, DPT, provides guidance for runners considering orthotics. (aaptiv.com)

    Opioid-free TKA: John Baker, PT, DScPT, is taking part in a protocol that has eliminated opioids in TKA recovery. (Frederick, Marlyand, News-Post)

    Take a (bicycle) seat: Shane Page, PT, DPT, was named the winner of a development award that will help him make his "physiosaddle" bicycle seat a reality. (WHOTV 7 News, Dayton, Ohio)

    Good pain or bad pain? Christopher Ricardo PT, DPT, offers tips on how to tell which post-workout pain is ok, and which isn't. (The Washington Post)

    Care for the pelvic floor: Ingrid Harm-Ernandes, PT, helps her patient understand how best to treat her pelvic floor dysfunction. (Women'sHealth.com)

    A pain in the neck: Andrew Lui, PT, provides tips on identifying and correcting poor posture that could lead to neck pain. (USA Today)

    The problem with alternatives to opioids: Mark Bishop, PT, PhD, FAPTA, explains how prior authorization requirements can slow progress for patients seeking physical therapy as an alternative to opioids for pain management. (Tampa Bay Times)

    The heart of firefighting: Donald Shaw PT, PhD, is part of a research team that recently completed a study analyzing firefighters' heart rates when responding to different types of calls. (Prescott, Arizona, Daily Courier)

    Quotable: "Physical therapy is one of the best choices you can make in the treatment of chronic pain." - "Chronic Pain: Treat it With Mindfulness Meditation, Not Opioids," US News and World Report

    Got some good stuff? Let us know. Send a link to troyelliott@apta.org.