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  • The Good Stuff: Members and the Profession in the Media, October 2018

    "The Good Stuff," is an occasional series that highlights recent media coverage of physical therapy and APTA members, with an emphasis on good news and stories of how individual PTs and PTAs are transforming health care and society every day. Enjoy!

    PT student makes Team USA: Faith Farley, SPT, earned a position on Team USA to compete in the 2018 functional fitness world championship. (HuntingtonNews.Net)

    The right bike fit: Larry Meyer, PT, DPT, offers a motion-analysis system that incorporates a cyclist's technique into an evaluation designed to provide the best possible cycle-rider fit. (velonews)

    Global PT Day of Service, student-style: Wheeling Jesuit University (West Virginia) physical therapy students spent their Global PT Day of Service cleaning up and resurfacing a local playground. (Wheeling, West Virginia, Intelligencer News Register)

    Success in the long run: Staci Whitman, PT, just completed running the 6 biggest marathons in the world, known as the World Marathon Majors. (Arizona Daily Sun)

    Taking youth sports concussions seriously: Kelly Isakson, PT, explains the screenings and other services she offers youth athletes, and why they're important. (Moscow-Pullman, Idaho, Daily News)

    When QWERTY's not your type: Kevin Weaver, PT, DPT, weighs in on possible replacements for the standard computer keyboard. (MIT Technology Review)

    Is that surgery kneeded? Daniel Riddle, PT, PhD, FAPTA, discusses his research on inappropriate knee surgery. (New York Times)

    Never too old for fitness: Alice Bell, PT, DPT; Paul Gardner, PT; and Greg Hartley, PT, DPT, offer insights on fitness after age 50. (Reader's Digest)

    The student Ironman: Megan Gibbons, SPT, has qualified for the World Ironman Championship. (WBRE/WYOU News, Scranton, Pennsylvania)

    Up to your neck in headaches: Jennifer Penrose, PT, DPT, explains the origins of cervicogenic headaches. (thurstontalk.com)

    Cream of the crop: Brenau University (Georgia) students Jean-Marie Peters, SPT; Amber Holmes, SPT; and fellow BU PT students joined faculty members Robert Cantu, PT, EdD; and Tammy Buck, PT, DPT, in a unique program that brings students to migrant farming communities to provide care—and get a taste of the physical demands of migrant labor. (Brenau University Window online)

    Quotable: "These dedicated people have been there on our Grace-Filled Journey every step of the way. They've cried with us during hard times and they've helped us celebrate the smallest milestones that most people wouldn't even think twice about. But most importantly to us, they never give up on Grace. Some days, Grace's biggest accomplishment is a smile, but that doesn't stop any of her therapists from working hard and encouraging her (and us) to celebrate all that life has to offer." – Mary Herschelman, on the physical therapists, speech-language pathologusts, and occupational therapists who have worked with her daughter Grace, who has infantile neuroaxonal dystrophy. (Hillsboro, Illinois, Daily News)

    Got some good stuff? Let us know. Send a link to troyelliott@apta.org.

    Celebrate National Physical Therapy Month: Support #ChoosePT

    Recent data from the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention revealed that more than 1 in 5 US adults live with chronic pain. Now's the time to help people understand how physical therapy can help.

    October is National Physical Therapy Month (NPTM), an opportunity to amplify and promote the benefits of physical therapy, and to make more people aware of APTA’s #ChoosePT campaign, an initiative aimed at raising awareness of physical therapy as a safe and effective alternative to opioids for the treatment of chronic pain conditions. [Editor's note: those messages were emphasized as part of a recent national APTA satellite media tour that resulted in more than 200 television and radio interviews across the country to an audience of more than 13.1 million.]

    “Those of us in the profession have long understood that physical therapy is a safe and effective alternative to opioids for the treatment of chronic pain conditions,” said APTA President Sharon L. Dunn, PT, PhD. “APTA offers many creative ways for us to bring that understanding to our communities at a crucial time. My hope is that we can apply our dedication to our profession to an even larger effort to address a crisis that is impacting lives across the country.”

    In honor of NPTM, APTA has distributed a nationwide print and online feature article on the prevalence of low back pain and the many reasons patients and clients should choose physical therapy to safely manage their pain. In addition, APTA continues to add resources to its #ChoosePT online toolkit, a 1-stop shop for tips, tools, and information about the risks of opioids and how physical therapy can help with pain management.

    Getting involved in NPTM is easy. Here are 5 ways to share the #ChoosePT message this month and all year long:

    1. Access handouts, social media graphics, and other resources from the #ChoosePT toolkit.
    APTA’s award-winning #ChoosePT campaign has reached millions to promote treatment by physical therapists (PTs) for pain management. Whether you’re participating in a community event or sharing resources online, the #ChoosePT campaign toolkit has what you need.

    2. Take the #ChoosePT message somewhere fun—and take a picture!
    We want to know how you’re celebrating NPTM. Go find a landmark, a park, a mountaintop, and anywhere in between, and take a photo demonstrating your #ChoosePT pride. Post them to social media using the #ChoosePT hashtag or email them to public-relations@apta.org. We’ll be sharing our favorites throughout the month.

    3. Get the #ChoosePT TV and radio public service announcement aired in your area.
    APTA’s latest public service announcement has already reached more than 50 million Americans. Help us grow that by volunteering to contact your local TV and radio stations. Email public-relations@apta.org to volunteer and APTA staff will provide you with step-by-step instructions.

    4. Promote MoveForwardPT.com.
    APTA’s official consumer information site serves millions of Americans each year. From symptoms and conditions guides to patient stories, podcasts, and tips pages, MoveForwardPT.com is your go-to resource for showing all the ways PTs and physical therapist assistants transform lives.

    5. Update your Find a PT profile.
    National Physical Therapy Month activities lead to an increase in traffic to Find a PT, APTA’s national database of practicing clinicians. Make sure to update or activate your profile so consumers and other health care professionals can easily find you.

    Contact APTA's public and media relations staff at public-relations@apta.org with any questions.

    Jeanne Fischer, Pediatric Physical Therapy Pioneer and Distinguished Mentor, Dies at 94

    One of the first school therapists in Washington State and a lifelong advocate for persons with disabilities, physical therapist (PT) pioneer Jeanne Fischer, PT, died on September 4, 2018, in Tacoma, Washington. She was 94.

    A graduate of the physical therapist educational program at the University of Kansas in 1948, Fischer began her at St Luke’s Hospital in Kansas City, Missouri. In 1958, she began a 31-year tenure as a PT for the Tacoma, Washington, School District while married and raising 3 young daughters. It was during her years as a school-based PT that Fischer gained her reputation as an outstanding mentor and advocate.

    Fischer was a founding member of the former Section on Pediatrics (now the Academy of Pediatric Physical Therapy), serving as the group's vice chair from 1979 to 1983. She also served as head of the Pediatric Specialty Council responsible for the development of the APTA specialty certification in pediatric physical therapy. In 1981, she was honored with the section’s G.E. (Bud) De Haven Award for extraordinary service and, in 1984, received a certificate of appreciation for outstanding service as the pediatric representative to APTA’s initial Task Force in Clinical Specialization.

    The academy further acknowledged Fischer's commitment to mentorship when it created the Jeanne Fischer Distinguished Mentorship Award in 1993. The award, bestowed annually at the APTA Combined Sections Meeting, recognizes an academy member who has demonstrated sustained, altruistic mentorship beyond that expected within their regular employment.

    In addition to honors from the academy, Fischer received numerous national and state awards. APTA recognized Fischer with both a Lucy Blair Service Award and Henry O. and Florence Kendall Award. Fischer received a Distinguished Service Award from the Washington State Physical Therapy Association and the William Duncan Award from United Cerebral Palsy of Washington. In 1996, APTA honored Fischer for 50 years of membership and service, calling her a pioneer in the profession.

    Memorial donations may be made to United Cerebral Palsy. More information celebrating Fischer's life can be found here.

    Get 'Caught Doing Good,' and APTA May Donate $500 to Your Charity of Choice

     PTDOS

    Making plans for the Global PT Day of Service coming up on October 13? Snap a picture of what you're up to, and your charity of choice could wind up with a $500 donation from APTA.

    Now in its third year, the Global PT Day of Service is an initiative designed to inspire physical therapists (PTs), physical therapist assistants (PTAs), students, and supporters of the profession to step up and make a difference in the lives of others through community service. All types of service efforts are welcomed, from volunteering at a pro bono clinic, to cleaning up a local park, to providing community children with working bicycles. It's a great time to get creative with impactful ideas that help underscore the transformative power of the physical therapy profession.

    Again this year, APTA is highlighting the day by way of a photo contest. The rules are simple: share a photo or set of photos from your community event through social media during the week of October 8-13. Be sure to use the hashtag #PTDOS, and you're entered. APTA will choose a winner and donate $500 to the charity of the winner's choice—as well as publish the photo or photos on the APTA website. Photos must be posted by midnight Friday, October 19, to be considered.

    Looking for more ways to demonstrate the profession's investment in improving communities? Here are a few ideas.

    Pledge to Participate in PT Day of Service
    Join fellow members of the physical therapy profession around the world in a day of service to our communities. Learn how you can make a difference!

    50-Chapter Challenge
    Get your APTA state chapter involved in Global PT Day of Service by sponsoring an activity on October 13. Sponsorships are available for as little as $250, and participation includes any community service activity. It's a great way to build membership, build community, and raise funds for better access to quality PT and PTA services. Contact info@ptdayofservice.com for more information.

    Alexandria, Virginia, Area: Join APTA Staff for Blood Drive
    Join APTA staff members to participate in a neighborhood blood drive at APTA headquarters on October 3, 9:30 am–3:00 pm. The Inova Blood Donor Services mobile donation vehicle will be onsite collecting blood and blood supplies for use in Hurricane Florence relief efforts. Sign up online today.

    Alexandria, Virginia, Area: Join APTA Staff to be a Baseball 'Angel'
    APTA staff and local APTA members will participate in the Miracle League of Alexandria baseball game Saturday, October 13, 1:00 pm–2:30 pm and Wednesday, October 17, 4:30 pm–6:30 pm by acting as "Angels in the Outfield." Volunteers will assist Miracle League players to run bases—either running for them, pushing wheelchairs, or just helping them and encouraging them along. Show up to cheer on the players, or sign up to be an angel.

    Explore Other Possibilities
    Contact a Global PT Day of Service Ambassador to discuss ideas and opportunities—the possibilities are wide open.

    State-Level PT Advocates Honored at 2018 Policy and Payment Forum

    Recognition of the importance of nonpharmacological pain therapies, adoption of the physical therapy licensure compact, a higher-profile role for physical therapists (PTs) in concussion management, and improving the legal scope of practice for physical therapists were among the accomplishments of this year's APTA State Legislative Leadership and Legislative Commitment Award winners recognized at the association's recent State Policy and Payment Forum in Kansas City, Missouri. The event was co-hosted by the Missouri and Kansas chapters of APTA.

    This year, 4 PTs were honored for their service to the profession at the state level:

    Mark Bishop, PT, PhD, FAPTA, was presented with an APTA State Legislative Leadership Award for his work in Florida to address the opioid crisis. Bishop's leadership and expertise was instrumental in the Florida Physical Therapy Association's development of a legislative amendment, adopted into the Florida Substance Abuse Act, that requires prescribers of controlled substances to complete a 2-hour continuing education course on prescribing controlled substances that must include information on nonpharmacological therapies.

    Cynthia Driskell, PT, also earned an APTA State Legislative Leadership Award in recognition of her achievements over 8 years as state legislative chair for the Arizona Chapter of APTA. Driskell's skills at facilitation were most recently brought to bear on a multisession effort to include PTs among the providers empowered to make return-to-play decisions for athletes and a successful push to include PTs with a sports specialty certification to participate in a concussion management pilot program.

    Derek Gerber, PT, DPT, of Idaho, was the third recipient of a State Legislative Leadership Award. Gerber led a successful push to eliminate the state's prohibition on dry needling by PTs, a change that was signed into law in March. Thanks to Gerber's extensive involvement in the effort, Idaho now allows PTs to practice dry needling after they have completed specified education and training requirements.

    Emilie Jones, PT, DPT, was honored with the APTA State Legislative Commitment Award. Jones, who served 3 years as legislative committee chair for the Washington Chapter of APTA, was instrumental in addressing several crucial issues in the state, including assistive personnel revisions, progress on dry needling, and the adoption of the physical therapy licensure compact.

    The APTA State Policy and Payment Forum focuses on advocacy and legislative issues at the state level. Check out pictures from the event here.

    State Forum Awards
    This year's state legislative award winners (from left): Emilie Jones, PT, DPT; Derek Gerber, PT, DPT; and Cynthia Driskell, PT. Not pictured: Mark Bishop, PT, PhD, FAPTA. Jones, Driskell, and Bishop received State Legislative Leadership Awards; Gerber received a State Legislative Commitment Award.

    The Good Stuff: Members and the Profession in the Media, September 2018

    "The Good Stuff," is an occasional series that highlights recent media coverage of physical therapy and APTA members, with an emphasis on good news and stories of how individual PTs and PTAs are transforming health care and society every day. Enjoy!

    Bringing the PT voice to the table: Amee Seitz, PT, DPT, PhD, is representing APTA on the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons work group developing clinical guidelines for management of rotator cuff injuries. (Northwestern University Medicine News)

    Addressing a pain feedback system gone "haywire": Tara Legar, PT, explains how physical therapy can help people with chronic pain avoid opioids. (Pike County, Ohio, News Watchman)

    Quotable: "All too often, people get the advice to stop everything that they're doing, rest, take some opioid medication. And we know now that's the wrong treatment." –Judith Turner, pain management specialist, on the importance of physical therapy for low back pain. (KABC-7 Eyewitness News, Los Angeles)

    Friend of the court: Julie Moon, PT, has a very special patient—her father, a retired chief justice of the Hawaii Supreme Court. (KHON 2 News, Honolulu)

    Pilates for neurological conditions: Kelsey Garcia PT, DPT, leads a 5-week program that delivers “Pilates-based” physical therapy to individuals with PD, MS, spinal cord injury, and more. (Miami's Community Newspapers group)

    A Special Olympics health leader: Jen Roberts, PT, DPT, was named the winner of a Special Olympics North Carolina "Golisano Health Leadership Award." (Charlotte-Raleigh citybizlist)

    It's manely about physical therapy: John Payne, PT, discusses the benefits of hippotherapy. (Tacoma, Washington, News-Tribune)

    Pelvic floor health: Jaime Rogers, PT, says people shouldn't be hesitant to discuss pelvic disorders with their health care providers. (Lawrence, Kansas, Journal-World)

    The right way to reduce back pain: Karen Joubert, PT, DPT, discusses the best ways to get relief from back, neck, and shoulder pain. (KTLA 5 News, Los Angeles)

    A groundbreaker: Dan Hatch, PT, DPT, was named 1 of Newport, Rhode Island's top 10 "Groundbreakers" for his value-based, cash-based practice.(Providence, Rhode Island, Journal)

    A balanced approach to vertigo: DuPree Zumbro, PT, DPT, outlines 5 things to know about vertigo. (Wilmington, North Carolina, Star News)

    Preventing the first fall: Lori Schrodt, PT, PhD, explains the importance of balance and falls-risk screenings. (Asheville, North Carolina, Mountain Express)

    Quotable: "I know that physical therapy is worth it in the end. It helps me SAFELY continue going about my life. I have never finished a session and thought, 'Well, that was a bad decision.'” – Kendall Harvey, who has Friedreich's ataxia, on the importance of physical therapy in her life. (Friedreich's Ataxia News)

    Got some good stuff? Let us know. Send a link to troyelliott@apta.org.

    APTA Honors and Awards Nominations Now Open

    Members of the physical therapy profession do amazing things for people every day, and not just inside the walls of a clinic. Now's the time to honor those contributions by nominating an APTA member for national recognition through the APTA Honors & Awards program.

    The APTA Honors & Awards program is now accepting nominations for the 2019 awards cycle, an annual effort aimed at celebrating members' outstanding achievements in the areas of education, practice and service, publications, research, academic excellence, humanitarian work, and societal impact. The program also includes the Catherine Worthingham Fellows of APTA, the Mary McMillan Lecture Award, and the John H.P. Maley Lecture Award.

    Detailed award descriptions, eligibility information, and nomination instructions for these and the many other awards and honors in the program are available on the APTA Honors & Awards webpage. Deadline for nominations is December 1.

    Award winners will be recognized at the 2019 NEXT Conference and Exhibition, set for June 12-15 in Chicago. For more information, email Alissa Patanarut.

    From PT in Motion Magazine: Making the Switch From Clinician to Manager

    It's no secret that many of the skills that make someone a good physical therapist (PT)—empathy, communication, being goal-oriented—also lend themselves to a management role. The question is, would a management role right for you?

    In this month’s issue of PT in Motion magazine, author Michele Wojciechowski reports on the experiences of several PTs who moved from frontline clinician to manager. They describe why they made the switch, skills a prospective manager may need to develop, and what makes an administrative role rewarding.

    "In my role, I need to understand where people are coming from, then help them problem-solve and find solutions," says COL Deydre S. Teyhen, PT, DPT, PhD. "PTs do that every day with their patients. They do it when they create a plan of care. Some of that can be complicated—involving the family, the patient's specific needs, time commitments, and other factors. You're often dealing with these same variables when you're in the administrative realm."

    Physical therapist clinicians may have an edge over administrators with a nonclinical background. "PTs in general are highly qualified for managerial roles because we tend to be type-A personalities, and we're really organized," says LTC Scott Gregg, PT, MHA, MBA. "We're quantitatively focused because we're so used to writing goals for all of our patients. As a result, we're good at setting goals for ourselves," he says. "When we're talking with providers, we can speak their language—whereas many administrators who don't have a clinical background get lost in these discussions."

    The article also suggests ways for PTs to build the skills or knowledge they don’t have on the business side.

    Not everyone would be happy in a managerial role, so it’s important to understand your strengths and what you value in your job. "You need to spend enough time in the field to know what your passion is," Gregg says. "If it's taking care of patients, then keep doing that. But if your passion is more on the administrative side, more having to do with numbers, then you should look at going in that direction."

    "PTs in Management Roles: How to Make the Journey" is featured in the September issue of PT in Motion magazine and is open to all viewers—pass it along to nonmember colleagues to show them one of the benefits of belonging to APTA. Printed editions of the magazine are mailed to all members who have not opted out; digital versions are available online to members.

    5 Ways to Raise Awareness During National Physical Therapy Month in October

    It's early September, which means that now's the time to begin thinking about what you'll be doing to call attention to the benefits of physical therapy during National Physical Therapy Month in October. Here are 5 ways to get involved:

    1. Get T-shirts, magnets, handouts, social media graphics, and other resources from the #ChoosePT toolkit.
    APTA’s award-winning #ChoosePT campaign has reached millions to promote physical therapist (PT) treatment for pain management. Whether you’re participating in a community event or sharing resources online, the #ChoosePT campaign toolkit has what you need.

    2. Arrange to have the #ChoosePT public service announcement aired on TV and radio stations near you.
    Launched in February, APTA’s latest public service announcement has already reached more than 50 million Americans. You can make that number grow by volunteering to contact your local TV and radio stations. Email public-relations@apta.org to volunteer and APTA staff will provide the specific instructions you need to succeed.

    3. Take the #ChoosePT message somewhere fun—and take a picture!
    Sometimes raising awareness is as simple as getting out in the world wearing a #ChoosePT shirt or holding a #ChoosePT sign (available in the toolkit). So go find a landmark, a park, a mountaintop, and anywhere in between, and take photos of you showing your #ChoosePT pride. Post them to social media using the #ChoosePT hashtag or email them to us at public-relations@apta.org. We’ll share our favorites in October.

    4. Promote MoveForwardPT.com.
    APTA’s official consumer information site serves millions of Americans each year. From symptoms and conditions guides to patient stories, podcasts, and tips pages, MoveForwardPT.com is your go-to resource for showing all the ways PTs and physical therapist assistants transform lives.

    5. Update your Find a PT profile.
    Each year, National Physical Therapy Month activities lead to an increase in traffic to Find a PT, APTA’s national database of practicing physical therapist clinicians. Make sure to update or activate your profile so consumers and other health care professionals can find you.

    Questions? Ideas? Contact APTA's public relations staff at public-relations@apta.org.

    Past APTA President Ward Named Presiding Officer for Upcoming WCPT Meeting

    Former APTA president R. Scott Ward, PT, PhD, FAPTA, has been appointed by the World Confederation for Physical Therapy (WCPT) to serve as the presiding officer of its 19th General Meeting in Geneva, Switzerland, May 7-9, 2019.

    The General Meeting of the WCPT draws together delegates from over 100 member organizations, representing the primary physical therapy associations in their respective countries around the globe. As the presiding officer, Ward will conduct and coordinate the business of the delegate assembly of the General Meeting.

    Ward brings to this prestigious appointment a wealth of experience and expertise in governance, leadership, scholarship, and international service. He served as APTA’s delegate to the 17th WCPT General Meeting in Amsterdam in 2011 and as alternate delegate to the 18th General Meeting in Singapore in 2015. While president of APTA, Ward represented APTA at all meetings of the North American Caribbean region of WCPT. For more than 8 years he has provided education to physical therapists under the World Health Organization’s curriculum for the provision of manual wheelchairs in less-advantaged countries.

    Ward led APTA as its president from 2006 to 2012, was a member of APTA’s Board of Directors, was president of APTA’s Utah Chapter, and has received numerous awards and recognition for his longstanding service and contributions to physical therapy. He currently is chair of the Department of Physical Therapy and Athletic Training at the University of Utah and is a board member of the American Council of Academic Physical Therapy.

    "Scott stands out as a leader, and his experience in the US and internationally are well suited to WCPT,” said APTA President Sharon Dunn, PT, PhD in an APTA news release. “He has been an asset to APTA, both as a member, former president, and friend. And I am sure his leadership and guidance will be invaluable during WCPT’s General Meeting.”

    APTA is a founding member of WCPT and has participated in all 19 General Meetings. Dunn also will attend as a voting delegate along with 2 nonvoting delegates from APTA.