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  • The Good Stuff: Members and the Profession in the Media, January 2020

    "The Good Stuff" is an occasional series that highlights recent media coverage of physical therapy and APTA members, with an emphasis on good news and stories of how individual PTs, PTAs, and students are transforming health care and society every day. Enjoy!

    PT leadership for USA Gymnastics: Kim Kranz, PT, DscPT, has been named USA Gymnastics' first vice president of Athlete Health and Wellness. (Around the Rings)

    When resolutions become a pain: Ryan Balmes, PT, DPT, and Jessica Douglas, PT, MSPT, offer advice on how to take on that New Year's fitness resolution without getting hurt. (Boston Globe)

    Redskins score a key PT: Kevin Wilk, PT, DPT, FAPTA, is now the Washington Redskins' medical trainer. (Redskins Wire)

    The importance of the pelvic floor: Riana Taktikos, PT, DPT, explains the ways pelvic floor physical therapy can help conditions that many people think they just have to live with. (Warren, Ohio, Tribune-Chronicle)

    Home is where the gym is: David Reavy, PT, MBA, shares his favorite piece of home gym equipment. (Gear Patrol)

    Solving middle back pain: Tony D'Angelo, PT, outlines what's different about middle back pain, and provides tips on addressing it. (Shape)

    Balance in all things: Ben Fung, PT, DPT, MBA; and Kathleen Walworth, PT, DPT, stress the importance of good balance, and suggest ways to improve. (Vitacost.com)

    Flying with the Eagles: St. Francis University (Pennsylvania) physical therapy students helped members of the Philadelphia Eagles create adaptive ride-ons for kids with disabilities at a recent GoBabyGo event. (Altoona, Pennsylvania Mirror)

    The power of neurologic physical therapy: Ian Lonich, PT, DPT, is making a difference for patients in southwest Pennsylvania. (Uniontown, Pennsylvania Herald-Standard)

    Pillow talk: Karena Wu, PT, DPT, MS, discusses the advantages of body pillows. (Bustle)

    Goodbye, crunches: Bethanie Bayha, PT, DPT, provides insight on better core-strengthening exercises. (Self)

    Go ask pectoralis: Danielle Weis, PT, DPT, discusses ways to counter pectoralis muscle imbalances that cause neck pain. (Well and Good)

    The PT's role in responding to autism spectrum disorder: Anjana Bhat, PT, is leading the way helping children with ASD improve social skills and communication through physical therapy. (University of Delaware News)

    Speedbumps on the road to fitness: Todd Kruse, PT, MPT, shares insights on preventing injury while pursuing fitness resolutions. (KEYC12 News, Mankato, Minnesota)

    I'll be sore for Christmas: Anna Friedman, PT, says yes, Virginia, there is a "Santa strain." (KOMO News, Seattle)

    Delivering postpartum fitness: Carrie Pagliano, PT, DPT, unpacks the trend toward exercise programs for new mothers. (Wall Street Journal)

    GoBabyGo, Colorado style: Jessica Albers, PT; and Kristen Holman, PT, DPT, spearheaded a recent effort to retrofit children's vehicles to provide independence — and a lot of fun — for children with disabilities. (Coloradoan)

    There's no place like foam: Theresa Marko, PT, DPT, MS, discusses the advantages and uses of foam rollers. (Insider)

    Got some good stuff? Let us know. Send a link to troyelliott@apta.org.

    We Have a Winner: ONE by ONE Member Recruitment Effort's Prizewinner List Continues to Grow

    Heather Prather, PT, DPT, says APTA membership gives her the information and peer connections she needs to thrive in her profession. And she must make a pretty compelling case, at least as far as new APTA member Erin Brannan, PTA, is concerned.

    Prather is the latest prize-drawing winner in APTA's ONE by ONE membership campaign, a project that encourages members to recruit their fellow PTs, PTAs, and physical therapy students — in Prather's case, it was Erin Bannan — to join APTA. Every member who refers a new or returning member is entered into a monthly drawing for a free year of APTA membership. In December, Prather's name was drawn. Both Prather and Brannon are from New Mexico.

    "I renewed my APTA membership, as I enjoy having access to the clinical tool box for quick access to different outcome measures and appropriate exercises and protocols to utilize based on diagnosis," Prather said. “I enjoy receiving the PT in Motion magazine and reading about up-to-date topics and what’s happening in the physical therapy world. The community boards are helpful to see what is being discussed, or as a lifeline to ask fellow members their advice or suggestions from their experiences on certain topics. It is great to be a member of APTA, to show support and that we are proud of our profession."

    The ONE by ONE campaign also holds a monthly prize drawing for new or renewing members referred through the campaign, awarding winners a subscription to APTA's Passport to Learning continuing education access system. The most recent winner was Steve Baron, PT, DPT, a new member from Pennsylvania. Baron was recruited by Matthew Will, PT, DPT, also from Pennsylvania.

    ONE by ONE offers additional opportunities to win, including a prize for the participating section that experiences the largest year-over-year growth rate during the campaign, and the chance to win one of five iPads that will be given away in a drawing of members who recruit five or more new members by the end of the campaign.

    Details on the recruitment effort — and a list of past prize winners — can be found on the ONE by ONE webpage, including a toolkit that gives you everything you need to join the campaign. ONE by ONE runs through September 30, 2020.

    APTA CEO Moore Joins Amputee Coalition Board

    APTA Chief Executive Officer Justin Moore, PT, DPT, has been unanimously elected to serve a four-year term on the Board of the Amputee Coalition, a leading national advocacy organization.

    The Amputee Coalition serves the more than two million Americans with limb loss and limb difference and more than 28 million at risk for amputation. Its mission is to raise awareness for and advocate on behalf of that population on Capitol Hill, and ensure that legislators and policymakers are educated about the unique needs of this community. The coalition’s work helps to secure the services, supports, and resources for individuals to live the lives they want to live.

    Moore will join 11 other board members who advise the organization on initiatives including federal policy outreach, insurance protections for patients, the organization’s National Limb Loss Resource Center, summer youth camp, and hospital partnerships.

    “Having Justin join our esteemed board of directors strengthens our ability to make progress toward our strategic goals and grow the coalition,” said Coalition CEO Mary Richards. “We all look forward to his vision, leadership, and insights about the federal policy landscape and how we can best serve our community.”

    “I am honored to have been elected to the Board of Directors of the Amputee Coalition," Moore said. “Clearly the coalition’s mission closely reflects APTA’s own vision — transforming society by optimizing movement to improve the human experience — which makes this position all the more significant to us. I look forward to working with the coalition to advocate for those they serve.”

    Paul Rockar Named Foundation President

    The Foundation for Physical Therapy Research (FPTR) has named former APTA President Paul Rockar Jr., PT, DPT, MS, as its president. Rockar, who served as a foundation trustee for three years prior, assumed his new role on January 1, 2020.

    Rockar is a well-known figure in the physical therapy profession, having served as a member of the APTA Board of Directors, as its vice president, and finally, as president of the organization from 2012 to 2015. Rockar is the former CEO of the Centers for Rehab Services.

    APTA and the foundation have a more than 40-year relationship focused on promoting physical therapy research. As a designated Pinnacle Partner of the foundation, APTA invested over $500,000 to support foundation initiatives including scholarships and fellowships in 2019.

    In his role as president, Rockar will work alongside his fellow Board of Trustees members to continue the foundation’s 2019-2022 strategic plan.

    “I am honored to have been chosen by my fellow trustees to lead FPTR at a time when research is so important to the profession,” said Rockar. “I look forward to collaborating with our partners and like-minded supporters — including APTA — to support research that leads to the best clinical guidelines and excellent patient care.”

    Rockar succeeds Edelle Field-Fote, PT, PhD, FAPTA, who concluded her term at the end of 2019.

    Public Awareness for Physical Therapy Is Ready to Rock Times Square

    When more than a million people gather in Times Square to watch the ball drop and celebrate the beginning of 2020, APTA's ChoosePT message will be there with them.

    APTA has launched digital billboard advertising in Times Square that will run not only on New Year's Eve but through the end of March 2020. An average of 380,000 pedestrians pass through Times Square each day, most of them tourists, giving the advertising national reach.

    APTA's 15-second billboard ad will appear on two adjoining screens at the corner of 43rd Street and Broadway, running a minimum of 20 times per day.

    The larger right screen will play a series of brief video clips that evoke the positive human experience of movement with messages that say, "Choose to ride. Choose to dance. Choose to love. Choose to play. Choose to climb. Choose to thrive. Choose physical therapy." The left screen will consistently share a call to action: "For what moves you, find a physical therapist at ChoosePT.com."

     

     

    ChoosePT.com includes APTA's "Find a PT" directory of APTA member physical therapists who are willing to be contacted by consumers seeking care or by other health care providers making referrals.

    "This is a great opportunity to celebrate the positive impact that physical therapy has on people's lives and encourage them to choose physical therapy," said Jason Bellamy, APTA's executive vice president of strategic communications. "With increased traffic expected to Find a PT, it's really important for clinicians to update their profiles with accurate and detailed information to help consumers find the care they need."

    The Times Square advertising caps off a notable year for APTA's ongoing public awareness activities.

    • APTA went all-in on its "choose physical therapy" message, transitioning the 10-year-old Move Forward brand to ChoosePT, with an updated ChoosePT.com website that includes a significantly improved Find a PT database.
    • A national satellite media tour highlighting the benefits of physical therapy for pain awareness month reached more than 100 million viewers.
    • Online digital advertising pushed traffic to ChoosePT.com to record highs, boosting traffic to the improved Find a PT database in recent months.
    • APTA state chapters collaborated to create state-specific landing pages within ChoosePT.com, which are promoted to consumers using geolocation technology.

    Login at APTA.org to activate or update your Find a PT profile, including adding a headshot, selecting your area of practice focus, and ensuring that your current practice location information is accurate.

    Looking to share the ChoosePT message? Access the campaign toolkit.

     

    The Good Stuff: Members and the Profession in the Media, December 2019

    "The Good Stuff" is an occasional series that highlights recent media coverage of physical therapy and APTA members, with an emphasis on good news and stories of how individual PTs and PTAs are transforming health care and society every day. Enjoy!

    Making inclusion happen: Kendra Gagnon, PT, PhD, describes the philosophy behind "Harness School Café," a project that outfitted a school lunchroom with adaptive resources for students with disabilities. (KHSB 41 News, Kansas City, Missouri)

    Ho Ho Ow: Julie Lombardo, PT, DPT, offers tips on avoiding injury during holiday shopping and decorating. (channel3000.com)

    Tackling a career as a PT: Former Denver Broncos safety David Bruton Jr, SPT, has set his sights on earing his DPT at the University of Colorado. (9News, Denver)

    Physical therapy as part of the high school athlete's routine: Evan Chait, PT, discusses the advantages of physical therapy as an ongoing component of a high school athlete's training regimen. (Fox5 News, New York)

    Patelling it like it is: Kristi Fata, PT, DPT, says that with proper precautions, it's possible to continue running while experiencing runner's knee. (yahoo! Lifestyle)

    Go for your guns: Theresa Marko, PT, DPT, MS; Kellen Scantlebury, PT; and Nina Geromel, PT, DPT, ATC, discuss the effects of massage and the effectiveness of home massage guns.(Nutritious Life)

    Getting along swimmingly with a sprain: Margaret Conze, PT, MPT, provides her perspective on the advisability of swimming with a sprained ankle. (US Masters Swimming newsletter)

    Don't blow your big chance in snow business: Lori Thein Brody, PT, PhD, talks about safe ways to shovel snow. (Wisconsin public radio)

    Blood flow restriction therapy: Paula Shulthiess, PT, DPT, shares her thoughts on blood flow restriction therapy now being used in a West Virginia hospital center. (WBOY 12 News, Clarksburg, West Virginia)

    A PT's ankle on recovery: Rachel Tavel, PT, DPT, outlines ways to counter ankle pain. (Men's Health)

    Improving rheumatology: Robert Richardson, PT, MEd, FAPTA; Maura Daly Iveren, PT, DPT, SC, MPH, FAPTA; and Meredith Christiansen, PT, DPT, were among the winners of this year's Association of Rheumatology Merit Awards. (ARP newsletter)

    Quotable: "Unlike expensive new drugs…exercise can reduce costs in the health care system. For these reasons, it’s time for physicians, nurses, and health care organization systems to make their own new year’s resolution — to prioritize exercise as an intervention they prescribe to their patients." – health care writer Sachin Jain, on Encore Wellness, a program that emphasizes exercise as medicine. (Forbes magazine)

    Got some good stuff? Let us know. Send a link to troyelliott@apta.org.

    Veteran and Emerging Physical Therapy Leaders Speak Out

    What's the difference between an emerging physical therapy leader and a well-established one?

    Not much—at least when it comes to love for their work and their vision of the profession’s future. (Apologies if you were expecting a punchline.)

    For its December issue, PT in Motion magazine posed an identical set of questions about the physical therapy profession to 2 seemingly different groups: this year's cohort of Catherine Worthingham Fellows of APTA (FAPTAs), and the 2019 class of APTA Emerging Leaders nominated by their chapter or section. Answers from the physical therapists (PTs) and physical therapist assistants (PTAs) tell the story of a profession that embraces its transformative potential but is clear-eyed about the challenges standing in the way.

    Questions posed ranged from the personal ("What was the best piece of career advice you ever received?") to the arguably unlikely ("If you had the undivided attention of Congress for 10 minutes to educate lawmakers about something related to physical therapy, what would you say?"), and points between. The answers, at times, were equally far-ranging.

    At other times, however, a seeming consensus emerged. Most respondents, for example, felt that today's younger generation of PTs and PTAs are better at establishing a healthy work-life balance. Additionally, the seasoned professionals and the relative newcomers generally share a perception that the cost of physical therapy education is making it difficult to create a more diverse physical therapy workforce.

    And, while not articulated in every response, it becomes clear as the article unfolds that nearly every responding PT and PTA places a strong value in the potential for dedicated professionals to make a difference for both individual patients and the physical therapy profession as a whole.

    Interviewee Gammon Earhart, PT, PhD, FAPTA, sees that value as a source of optimism.

    "Our biggest strength is our people. I am inspired by the talented, dedicated leaders in all areas of our profession who are passionate advocates for physical therapy," she said. "My optimism for the future comes not only from these current leaders, but equally from up-and-coming students and early-career professionals who bring great energy and new ideas."

    "Generation Rap: Veteran and Emerging Leaders Speak Out" is featured in the December issue of PT in Motion magazine and is open to all viewers—pass it along to nonmember colleagues to show them 1 of the benefits of belonging to APTA.

    New APTA Campaign Makes Membership Personal—And Offers Prizes

    At APTA, it's always been about individual members working together to support shared values. That's the concept at the heart of a new membership campaign that builds on connections—and offers rewards to members who make them.

    APTA's "ONE by ONE" campaign, launched in October, makes membership personal by encouraging current members to recruit their fellow physical therapists (PTs), physical therapist assistants (PTAs), and physical therapy students to join the association. Every time they recruit a new or returning member, they're entered into a monthly drawing for a free year of APTA membership. And if a member is able to recruit 5 or more new members by the campaign's end on September 30, 2020, she or he is entered to win 1 of 5 iPads that will be given away in October 2020.

    But that's not all: If a new member also joins an APTA section, the recruiting member receives an additional entry in the monthly free membership drawing, and all new members recruited through ONE by ONE are entered into a monthly drawing for APTA’s Passport to Learning, which provides access to the association's continuing education offerings in the APTA Learning Center. There's even a prize for the participating section that experiences the largest year-over-year growth rate during the campaign. All the details can be found on the ONE by ONE webpage, including a toolkit that gives you everything you need to join the campaign.

    APTA member Christel Johnson, PT, MPT, from Texas, was among the first to win free APTA membership. She's thrilled to get a break on dues, of course, but is quick to point to the bigger picture.

    "I believe in APTA and what it stands for, and I appreciate how it works to support this profession that I love," Johnson said. "I speak with all of my colleagues, residents, and students, to make sure they understand all that APTA does for us and the importance of supporting the organization through membership."

    The APTA ONE by ONE campaign runs through September 30, 2020.

    The Good Stuff: Members and the Profession in the Media, November 2019

    "The Good Stuff" is an occasional series that highlights recent media coverage of physical therapy and APTA members, with an emphasis on good news and stories of how individual PTs and PTAs are transforming health care and society every day. Enjoy!

    Getting soldiers back in shape: Kevin Houck, PT, DPT, recounts his experiences providing physical therapy to soldiers in the Middle East and the US. (Sharon, Pennsylvania Herald)

    Don't get uptight (quads): Rachel Tavel PT, DPT, offers stretching and relief techniques to help counter tight quadriceps. (Men's Health)

    Home is where the PT is: Jay Shaver, PT, makes house calls. (Kalispell, Montana, Daily Inter Lake)

    Falls prevention: Alex Anderson, SPT, discusses the importance of falls screening for adults 55 and older. (WHSV3 News, Harrisonburg, Virginia)

    Hospital-YMCA partnership: Becky Geren, PT, explains the physical therapy benefits of a new partnership between a local hospital and YMCA. (Chattanooga, Tennessee, Times Free Press)

    Thumb thing to think about: John Gallucci, PT, DPT, affirms that yes, "text thumb" is an actual injury, and provides tips on easing the discomfort.(Yahoo! Lifestyle)

    Making exercise habit-forming: Catherine Hoell, PT, DPT, shares her approach to helping her patients make exercise a part of their routines. (CapeCod.com)

    Quotable: "I want to be a patient advocate. I try to provide my patients with opportunities to improve their quality of life." -Ian Lonich, PT, DPT, who specializes in neurologic physical therapy. (Washington, Pennsylvania Observer-Reporter)

    Taping it for granted? Nick DiSarro, PT, DPT, peels back the real from the hype when it comes to kinesiology tape. (Parade)

    Spina bifida and e-stim: Gerti Motavalli, PT, outlines the benefits she has observed in using electrical stimulation therapy in treating children with spina bifida. (13 KRCG News, Columbia, Missouri)

    Advice for the hot-to-trot: Michael Conlon, PT, shares a few pointers to help get people ready to participate in post-Thanksgiving "Turkey Trot" runs. (NBC Better)

    Quotable: "I’m still interested in physical therapy. I get the magazines – it’s part of my life. You never get out of it!" Gertrude Schwarz, PT, who at 100 is the oldest living graduate of New York University's physical therapy program, on her love for her profession. (NYU News)

    Got some good stuff? Let us know. Send a link to troyelliott@apta.org.

    The Good Stuff: Members and the Profession in the Media, October 2019

    "The Good Stuff" is an occasional series that highlights recent media coverage of physical therapy and APTA members, with an emphasis on good news and stories of how individual PTs and PTAs are transforming health care and society every day. Enjoy!

    Quotable: “She pushes me almost to the limit every time I have physical therapy, which is twice a week. I encourage her to give me all I can take.” – Former President Jimmy Carter on the importance of physical therapy—and his PT—to his health at age 95. (Atlanta Journal Constitution)

    Honoring the "silent teachers": Tyler Tice, SPT, was among the University of Delaware College of Health Sciences students who spearheaded an effort to create an on-campus labyrinth honoring anatomical donors to the school. (University of Delaware UDNews)

    What lies beneath: Theresa Marko, PT, DPT, MS, describes the musculature that surfaces as sought-after "V-line abs"—after dietary change and a little exercise, of course. (openfit.com)

    Healthily ever after: Jenna Kantor, PT, DPT, is cofounder of Fairytale Physical Therapy, a program that incorporates theater and physical therapy in children's hospitals. (Good Morning America)

    Snooze, you win: Justin Ho, PT, DPT, outlines the importance of adequate sleep on overall health. (425 magazine)

    Getting out of a slump: Laurie Bell, PT, offers tips on attaining better posture. (Coshocton, Ohio Tribune)

    Aging should be a moving experience: Marion Marx, PT, age 90, helps her senior living community neighbors stay active. (Piedmont, California Patch)

    Putting a fine point on it: Josh Smith, PT, explains what dry needling's all about. (Lewes, Delaware Cape-Gazette)

    In sickness and in running shorts: David Ryland, SPT, managed to work in a marathon relay race on his wedding day—and his team earned second place. (Akron, Ohio Beacon Journal)

    Quotable: "Two minutes of being in there ... she knew. She put my arm up in the air and felt around and held my pulse. ... My pulse was just completely gone in my hand." – Madison Stoffel, a swimmer who experienced thoracic outlet syndrome that went undiagnosed—until she visited a PT. (Arlington Heights, Illinois Daily Herald)

    Got some good stuff? Let us know. Send a link to troyelliott@apta.org.