Archive: CSM 2013: Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Programming

  • This is archived programming for CSM 2013. See current programming.

    Browse Cardiovascular and Pulmonary sessions by day. Return to the main topic menu 

    Monday, January 21 | Tuesday, January 22 | Wednesday, January 23 | Thursday, January 24 

    * Should you choose to preselect regular (not preconference) Tuesday-Thursday sessions during the registration process, please be advised that preselection is not a guarantee of a seat. Attendees are asked to preselect to better determine room size and all efforts will be made to accommodate sessions in the largest rooms possible. All attendees are encouraged to show up to sessions early. Attendees are also encouraged to select alternative sessions in the event their first choice is full. 

    Monday, January 21 (Preconference)

    Assessment and Treatment of the Obese Patient Across the Lifespan: The Role of Physical Therapy

    Location: San Diego Convention Center | 16B

    Time: 8:00 am - 5:00 pm

    Speakers: Sharon A. Martino, PT, PhD; Shane Phillips, PT, PhD

    CEUs: 0.7 (7.0 contact hours/CCUs)

    Preconference Pricing: Standard Plus (1B)

    Obesity is a multifaceted disorder with concomitant effects on the cardiovascular, pulmonary, musculoskeletal, endocrine, and psychosocial systems. Obesity is associated with major causes of death and disability, and these adverse effects are observed throughout the life course—with the highest prevalence of obesity-related conditions occurring in middle-aged and older adults. The need for multidisciplinary intervention programs is clear; however, the assessment of the overweight/obese patient is less apparent, and the choice of outcome measures is even less evident. Cardio-metabolic measures, such as waist circumference, fasting blood glucose, blood pressure, and submaximal exercise testing are suitable for many in this population and may be predictive of future cardiovascular disease. The speaker will describe the epidemiology, risk factors, pathology, assessment, outcome measures, and physiologic biomarkers associated with obese patients across the lifespan. Additionally, the development, standardization, and sustainability of model programs will be described. The speaker will discuss case studies of children, adolescents, adults, and geriatric patients and group discussion will be facilitated to enhance the learning experience. Finally, the speaker will present research topics in obesity across the lifespan that provide evidence to support comprehensive obesity-rehabilitation paradigms.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Identify the organ systems and common complications that are related to obesity across the lifespan.
    • Recognize methods for assessing the patient who is overweight or obese.
    • Describe the importance of as well as methods for standardizing exercise programs.
    • Discuss methods for the development of multidisciplinary teams and programs to address obesity.
    • Express the scientific evidence that supports the role physical therapists can and should assume in the multidisciplinary-team approach to obesity prevention and treatment.

    Clinical Reasoning for the Patient with Complex Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Dysfunction

    Location: San Diego Convention Center | 16A

    Time: 8:00 am-5:00 pm

    Speakers: Daniel Malone, PT,PhD, MS,CCS; Stephen Sadowsky, PT, RRT, MS, CCS; Jennifer Ryan, PT, DPT, MS, CCS

    Level: Multiple Level

    CEUs: 0.8 (8.0 contact hours/CCUs)

    Preconference Pricing: Standard Plus (1B)

    Patients suffering complex cardiovascular and pulmonary disorders benefit from early mobilization and exercise training. Physical therapists who examine and plan interventions for these patients must consider the latest literature, as well as the pathophysiology of the disorder(s) to develop a reasoned clinical approach. The intervention should safely and effectively progress and maximize the patient’s activity tolerance, functional mobility, and independence. The speaker will use both lecture and small-group discussion to provide a comprehensive review of the pertinent literature, and examination and intervention techniques of selected diagnoses from across the practice spectrum. This practical exploration will address the clinical reasoning used for select diagnoses and medical tests and procedures, which often creates uncertainty in physical therapists. While this can be a great preparatory course for individuals considering taking the Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Board Certification Examination, it is intended as an opportunity for all clinicians seeking to advance their skills with patients presenting with complex cardiovascular and pulmonary disorders.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Analyze patient cases using the International Classification of Function and Disability (ICF) framework.
    • Apply clinical reasoning and diagnostic screening to determine if there is a need for referral to other health care professionals.
    • Use the current best evidence to facilitate decision-making in complex cardiovascular and pulmonary clinical cases.

    Tuesday, January 22

    Best Practices Update for Chronic Fatigue Syndrome/Myalgic Encephalomyelitis: The IACFS/ME Primer for Clinical Practitioners

    Time: 8:00 am–10:00 am (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Todd E. Davenport, PT, DPT; Staci R. Stevens, MA; Daniel L. Peterson, MD; Kenneth J. Friedman, PhD

    Level: Multiple Level

    Chronic fatigue syndrome/myalgic encephalomyelitis (CFS/ME) is one cause of clinically debilitating fatigue. Its features have been related to Gulf War syndrome and post-9/11 syndrome. CFS/ME may present a spectrum of symptoms, providing multiple reasons for entry to physical therapy. Physical therapists are in a unique position to identify CFS/ME and to direct appropriate management through both physical therapist interventions and referral to other health care providers. Over the past 2 years, an international working group of the International Association for Chronic Fatigue Syndrome/Myalgic Encephalomyelitis (IACFS/ME) has developed a document that describes current clinical best practices for the diagnosis, medical and psychological management, and physical rehabilitation for people with CFS/ME.

    This session will provide leading-edge information about physical therapy management of patients with CFS/ME from a group of recognized clinicians and researchers, including participants of the guideline development committee. In this session, the speakers will discuss the development of the IACFS/ME Primer for Clinical Practitioners; summarize the clinical features and patho-etiology of CFS/ME with respect to optimal identification, differential diagnosis, and clinical management by physical therapists; discuss current medical and psychological management for people with CFS/ME; and describe current concepts in physical rehabilitation for people with CFS/ME.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Define CFS/ME according to current classification models.
    • Discuss the evidence regarding the physical and cognitive pathophysiological processes that underlie the clinical presentation of CFS/ME.
    • Appraise a patient/client's case for the diagnostic features of CFS/ME.
    • Compare and contrast the clinical presentation of CFS with other health conditions that cause persistent pain and fatigue.
    • Summarize current medical and psychological management for CFS/ME.
    • Design and implement an evidence-based physical therapy management program for patients with CFS/ME.

    Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Research Update: Several Years in Review

    Time: 11:00 am–1:00 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Paul E. Ricard, PT, DPT, CCS, Larry Cahalin, PT, PhD, CCS

    Level: Multiple Level

    As evidenced by APTA’s Vision 2020 Statement, practitioners need access to and the ability to openly discuss advances in practice and concepts as they apply to the practice of cardiovascular and pulmonary physical therapy. Lack of accessibility, clinical or personal time, and/or knowledge of article synopsis can hinder this process that is progressing every month, many journals over. This course will provide a review of the cardiovascular and pulmonary literature published within the past 2 years. This review is meant to provide participants with a broad overview of research and will not be specific to any cardiovascular or pulmonary health condition. The speakers will present and give his interpretation of each study which is then open to discussion by all the participants.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Report and interpret new literature surrounding the examination of or treatment for cardiovascular and pulmonary health conditions.
    • Compare prior knowledge and practice to ideas and concept in current literature.
    • Discuss with peers the application and impact these studies can have on current and future practice.

    Linda Crane Lectureship—From Silos to Bridges: Preparing Effective Teams for a Better Delivery System

    Joint Program: Education, Pediatrics

    Time: 3:00 pm–5:00 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Sandy Cassady, PT, PhD

    Level: Multiple Level

    The World Health Organization's Framework for Action on Interprofessional Education and Collaborative Practice calls for the preparation of a collaborative-ready workforce to meet global health needs, including the management of chronic health conditions. While mechanisms that shape interprofessional education and collaborative practice vary among health systems, effective teamwork is a common ingredient for quality care. This presentation will focus on preparing physical therapists to serve as effective team members and strategies for incorporating team-based competencies into professional and postprofessional education programs.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Discuss frameworks for interprofessional teamwork and the core competencies for collaborative practice.
    • Recognize characteristics of effective teams, 5 dysfunctions of teams, and strategies for overcoming these dysfunctions.
    • Identify strategies for advancing team-based training in entry-level physical therapy curricula and advanced educational programs.

    Wednesday, January 23

    Death to PowerPoint! High-tech to Low-tech Teaching Strategies for Cardiovascular/Pulmonary Education

    Joint Program: Education

    Time: 8:00 am–10:00 am (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Donna Frownfelter, PT, DPT, MA, CCS, FCCP, RRT; Anne Mejia-Downs, PT, MPH, CCS; Anne K. Swisher, PT, PhD, CCS; Nancy S. Smith, PT, DPT, GCS

    Level: Multiple Level

    This course will cover teaching strategies for cardiopulmonary topics to increase student engagement and improve student learning outcomes. The presenters will facilitate a discussion of low-tech interventions to high-tech interventions for teaching cardiopulmonary physical therapy. Methods such as web-based modules, human patient simulation, virtual technologies, illustrative lab techniques, and interactive discussion techniques will be discussed as possible interventions for teaching cardiopulmonary physical therapy. Outcomes of different instructional methods will be discussed.

    Upon completion of this course, you’ll be able to:

    • Recognize the significance and pertinence of teaching on the subject of cardiovascular and pulmonary conditions in physical therapy, including incidence and prevalence of cardiovascular and pulmonary conditions in the general population.
    • Differentiate different teaching methods to teach topics in cardiovascular and pulmonary physical therapy from low-tech options to high-tech options.
    • Identify how technology may be leveraged to teach cardiovascular and pulmonary physical therapy, criteria for implementing technology, and the impact of technology use on student learning outcomes.
    • Discuss instructional design methodologies to increase student engagement and understanding of cardiopulmonary pathologies.
    • Describe how innovative teaching strategies in cardiopulmonary physical therapy can and have impacted student learning outcomes.

    I Want to Start Teaching in the Classroom: What's Next? Part 1

    Time: 8:00 am–10:00 am (See Program for Room)

    Level: Basic

    This is a joint program. See full description at Education programming.

    I Want to Start Teaching in the Classroom: What's Next? Part 2

    Time: 11:00 am–1:00 pm (See Program for Room)

    Level: Basic

    This is a joint program. See full description at Education programming.

    Oxygen Use Recommendations: An Algorithm (Clinical Decision Tree) to Use Across Practice Settings

    Time: 11:00 am–1:00 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Ellen Hillegass, PT, PhD, CCS, FAPTA; Rebecca Crouch, PT, DPT, CCS; Christiane Perme, PT, CCS; Larry Cahalin, PT, PhD, CCS; Rohini Chandrashekar, PT, CCS; Susan Butler-McNamara, PT, CCS; Ann Fick, PT, DPT, MS, CCS; Amy Pawlik, PT, DPT, CCS

    Level: Multiple Level

    APTA and the Cardiopulmonary and Pulmonary Section frequently receive questions regarding the evidence, legality, and proper methods for physical therapists’ administration and titration of supplemental oxygen. To address these questions, a task force was developed to examine the evidence, evaluate state practice acts and other policies and legislation related to the physical therapist's role in oxygen delivery, and provide recommendations to assist therapists in decision making. Evidence surrounding the use of supplemental oxygen in various patient populations and related legislative issues were presented at CSM in 2011. This follow-up presentation aims to briefly summarize that information as a background for the presentation of an algorithm that was developed by the task force to assist physical therapists in decision making regarding the delivery of supplemental oxygen. The algorithm will be presented along with the methods used to develop it and critically evaluate its potential usefulness and applicability for the physical therapist across practice settings.

    Upon completion of this course, you’ll be able to:

    • Discuss evidence related to the delivery of oxygen in various patient populations.
    • Identify challenges physical therapists may face related to the administration and titration of oxygen.
    • Discuss the development of an algorithm to assist practitioners in decision-making regarding oxygen delivery.
    • Discuss how the algorithm may be applied across practice settings.
    • Review legal issues related to the delivery of oxygen.

    Rehabilitation of Children on Ventricular Assist Devices

    Time: 3:00 pm–5:00 pm (See Program for Room)

    Level: Multiple Level

    This is a joint program. See full description at Pediatrics programming.

    Thursday, January 24

    Physical Therapy and Cystic Fibrosis: A Successful Team From Birth to Healthy Aging! Part 1

    Joint Program: Pediatrics

    Time: 8:00 am–10:00 am (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Anne K. Swisher, PT, PhD, CCS; Anne Mejia-Downs, PT, MPH, CCS; Robert Dekerlegand, PT, MPT, CCS; Matt Nippins, PT, DPT, CCS; Paul Ricard, PT, DPT, CCS; Anne Gould

    Level: Multiple Level

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is not only a lung disease occurring in childhood. The multisytemic nature of this lifelong disease provides opportunities for PTs with a variety of expertise to be involved. Recently, the CF Foundation began a program pairing PTs with limited experience managing this population with PT mentors based on the most recent scope of practice document describing physical therapy for all patients with CF. This presentation—by the authors of that document and other PTs experienced with this population—will discuss the complex disease of CF, its medical treatment, and how PTs’ expertise in optimizing breathing and exercise can help the care team improve the lives of individuals with CF across ages and care settings.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Describe the multisystemic effects of cystic fibrosis and how physical therapy assessment and intervention could mediate these effects.
    • Use the CF 101 for the Physical Therapist document to guide involvement of the PT in the CF care team.
    • Discuss how to integrate inpatient, outpatient, and home care PTs into the CF care team.

    Physical Therapy and Cystic Fibrosis: A Successful Team From Birth to Healthy Aging! Part 2

    Joint Program: Pediatrics

    Time: 11:00 am–1:00 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Anne K. Swisher, PT, PhD, CCS; Anne Mejia-Downs, PT, MPH, CCS; Robert Dekerlegand, PT, MPT, CCS; Matt Nippins, PT, DPT, CCS; Paul Ricard, PT, DPT, CCS; Anne Gould

    Level: Multiple Level

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is not only a lung disease occurring in childhood. The multisystemic nature of this lifelong disease provides opportunities for PTs with a variety of expertise to be involved. Recently, the CF Foundation began a program pairing PTs with limited experience managing this population with PT mentors based on the most recent scope of practice document describing physical therapy for all patients with CF. Individuals with CF need the skills and talents of PTs for optimal health. This session will discuss the disease-related impacts on posture, musculoskeletal status, and exercise capacity in both children and adults with CF. It will also include information about how physical therapy interventions are modified by disease-related complications such as lung transplant, CF-related diabetes, and aging.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Describe ways to assess musculoskeletal health and exercise capacity in individuals with CF.
    • Plan interventions for optimal musculoskeletal and exercise health for children and adults with CF.
    • Discuss how PT roles vary from newborn diagnosis through aging in the CF population.

    Rehabilitation for Solid Organ Transplantation: Inpatient and Outpatient Considerations

    Time: 11:00 am–1:00 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Rebecca Crouch, PT, DPT, CCS; Meghan Lahart, PT, DPT; Christine Schiel, PT, DPT; Sean Lowers, PT, DPT, CCS; Ellen Hillegass, PT, PhD, CCS, FAPTA

    Level: Multiple Level

    Physical therapists have become increasingly involved in the rehabilitation of patients who receive solid organ transplants. Organ transplant therapy may include heart, lung, liver, kidney, pancreas, bowel, and multi-organ transplantations. The spectrum spans from preoperative care and preparation to outpatient rehabilitation and preparation for discharge. This workshop will outline the evaluation and treatment protocols used to prepare patients for organ transplantation, postsurgical hospitalization and mobilization, and outpatient rehabilitation to achieve complete independence.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Identify the role of the physical therapist in the evaluation and rehabilitation of solid organ transplantation.
    • Outline exercise recommendations for preoperative preparation of the patient who is to receive a solid organ transplant.
    • Name the components of a postoperative evaluation and treatment plan unique to multiple organ transplantation protocols following surgery and during hospitalization.
    • Review the common monitoring equipment and parameters used to safely progress exercise prior to hospital discharge.
    • Discuss the evaluation and program design of an outpatient rehabilitation program for solid organ transplant patients.
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