Archive: CSM 2013: Orthopaedics Programming

  • This is archived programming for CSM 2013. See current programming.

    Browse Orthopaedics sessions by day. Return to the main topic menu 

    Sunday, January 20 | Monday, January 21 | Tuesday, January 22 | Wednesday, January 23 | Thursday, January 24 

    * Should you choose to preselect regular (not preconference) Tuesday-Thursday sessions during the registration process, please be advised that preselection is not a guarantee of a seat. Attendees are asked to preselect to better determine room size and all efforts will be made to accommodate sessions in the largest rooms possible. All attendees are encouraged to show up to sessions early. Attendees are also encouraged to select alternative sessions in the event their first choice is full. 

    Sunday, January 20 (Preconference)

    Manual Therapy Interventions for the Lower Extremity: A Laboratory Intensive Course, Part 1

    Location: San Diego Convention Center | 7A

    Time: 8:00 am - 5:00 pm

    Speakers: Gail Deyle, PT, DSc, DPT, OCS, FAAOMPT; Stephanie Albin, PT, DPT, OCS, FAAOMPT; Jake Magel, PT, DSc, OCS, FAAOMPT

    Level: Intermediate

    CEUs: 1.7 (17.0 contact hours/CCUs)

    Preconference Pricing: Standard Plus (2B) 2 Day

    This 2-day, hands-on, laboratory-based course will review the use of mobilization and manipulation techniques for the lower extremity, including the hip, knee, and foot/ankle. The morning session will focus on the current evidence to support the use of the manual therapy techniques for the lower extremity. The afternoon session of the first day will be a hands-on laboratory session on manual therapy techniques for the hip region. The morning session of the second day will focus on knee and foot/ankle manual therapy techniques. The afternoon session of the second day will include a laboratory session on the use of mobilization of movement, followed by case studies to demonstrate the integration of manual therapy interventions into the patient plan of care. The best available evidence will be integrated into all discussions and laboratory sessions. The intent of this course is to provide attendees with useful, clinically relevant information that can be immediately applied to various practice settings.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Select appropriate manual therapy techniques to address impairments identified for selected patient populations.
    • Recognize impairments, above and below the affected regions, that may contribute to the patient's primary complaint.
    • Safely, effectively, and skillfully perform the manual therapy techniques to effectively manage motion dysfunctions and/or pain of the hip, knee, and foot/ankle.
    • Critically appraise the manual therapy intervention strategies used for the hip, knee, and foot/ankle, consistent with the available evidence-based literature.
    • Use appropriate manual therapy interventions to augment a comprehensive therapeutic exercise as part of the plan of care.

    *SOLD OUT - Manual Therapy Interventions for the Spine: A Laboratory Intensive Course, Part 1

    Location: San Diego Convention Center | 8

    Time: 8:00 am - 5:00 pm

    Speakers: Louie Puentedura, PT, DPT, PhD, OCS, FAAOMPT; Michael Timko, PT, MS, FAAOMPT; Adriaan Louw, PT, MAppSc, GCRM

    Level: Advanced

    CEUs: 1.7 (17.0 contact hours/CCUs)

    Preconference Pricing: Standard Plus (2B) 2 Day

    This 2-day, hands-on, laboratory-based course will focus on the use of mobilization and manipulation techniques for the cervical, thoracic, and lumbar spine, as well as the sacroiliac joint. The morning session of the first day will review the current evidence to support the use of the manual therapy techniques for the spine. The afternoon session of the first day will be a hands-on laboratory session focusing on manual therapy techniques for the lumbar spine and sacroiliac joint. The speakers will discuss the thoracic spine during the morning session of the second day. The cervical spine will be the subject of the afternoon session of the second day. Case studies will be used to illustrate the integration of spinal manual therapy interventions into the patient plan of care. The best available evidence will be integrated into all discussions and laboratory sessions. The intent of this course is to provide attendees with useful, clinically relevant information that can be immediately applied to various practice settings.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Select appropriate manual therapy techniques to address impairments identified for selected patient populations.
    • Recognize impairments, above and below the affected regions, that may contribute to the patient's primary complaint.
    • Safely, effectively, and skillfully perform the manual therapy techniques to effectively manage motion dysfunctions and/or pain of the cervical, thoracic, and lumbar spine, as well as sacroiliac joint.
    • Critically appraise the manual therapy intervention strategies used for the spine and sacroiliac joint, consistent with the available evidence-based literature. • Use appropriate manual therapy interventions to augment a comprehensive therapeutic exercise as part of the plan of care.

    Treating Scoliosis of All Ages: The 3-Dimensional Schroth-based Method to Arrest and Prevent the Progression of Scoliosis, Part 1

    Location: San Diego Convention Center | 7B

    Time: 8:00 am - 5:00 pm

    Speakers: Hagit Berdishevsky, PT, MSPT, SST

    Level: Intermediate

    CEUs: 1.5 (15.0 contact hours/CCUs)

    Preconference Pricing: Standard Plus (2B) 2 Day

    The Schroth Method for scoliosis treatment is defined as the best practice by the International Society on Scoliosis Orthopedic and Rehabilitation Treatment. It has been found to be an effective conservative treatment modality when used in the management of patients with scoliosis. The goals of this unique technique are to arrest and/or prevent curvature progression; maintain function; reduce and prevent symptoms of scoliosis, such as pain and pulmonary dysfunction; and raise patient self-esteem. This method is a conservative physical therapy approach that works with exercises that elongate the trunk, correct the imbalances of the body, and use special corrective breathing techniques to change the shape of the thorax and the imbalanced pelvis that have been effected by scoliosis. The speaker will discuss, demonstrate, and practice the principles of the Schroth Method throughout 2 days of lecture, laboratory demonstration, and practice. A review of the most recent literature will be provided, with a focus on the application of the method for outpatient physical therapy in the US. Topics will include classification, clinical evaluation, principles of correction, starting positions, basic exercises, and active-passive corrections.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Identify the clinical assessment steps performed during patient examination and screening.
    • Describe the Schroth Method classification for scoliosis and differentiate patients into therapeutic subgroups.
    • Identify appropriate physical therapy interventions in regards to the scoliosis curve angle/pattern, age, and maturity.
    • Differentiate between the Schroth Method principles: axial elongation (detorsion), asymmetric sagittal straightening, increasing frontal plane corrections, rotational breathing, and increasing muscle activation.
    • Determine exercises appropriate for the patient classification (eg, major thoracic, major lumbar, double major, with/without pelvic deformity)

    Monday, January 21 (Preconference)

    Manual Therapy Interventions for the Lower Extremity: A Laboratory Intensive Course, Part 2

    Location: San Diego Convention Center | 7A

    Time: 8:00 am - 5:00 pm

    Speakers: Gail Deyle, PT, DSc, DPT, OCS, FAAOMPT; Stephanie Albin, PT, DPT, OCS, FAAOMPT; Jake Magel, PT, DSc, OCS, FAAOMPT

    Level: Intermediate

    CEUs: 1.7 (17.0 contact hours/CCUs)

    Preconference Pricing: Standard Plus (2B) 2 Day

    This 2-day, hands-on, laboratory-based course will review the use of mobilization and manipulation techniques for the lower extremity, including the hip, knee, and foot/ankle. The morning session will focus on the current evidence to support the use of the manual therapy techniques for the lower extremity. The afternoon session of the first day will be a hands-on laboratory session on manual therapy techniques for the hip region. The morning session of the second day will focus on knee and foot/ankle manual therapy techniques. The afternoon session of the second day will include a laboratory session on the use of mobilization of movement, followed by case studies to demonstrate the integration of manual therapy interventions into the patient plan of care. The best available evidence will be integrated into all discussions and laboratory sessions. The intent of this course is to provide attendees with useful, clinically relevant information that can be immediately applied to various practice settings.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Select appropriate manual therapy techniques to address impairments identified for selected patient populations.
    • Recognize impairments, above and below the affected regions, that may contribute to the patient's primary complaint.
    • Safely, effectively, and skillfully perform the manual therapy techniques to effectively manage motion dysfunctions and/or pain of the hip, knee, and foot/ankle.
    • Critically appraise the manual therapy intervention strategies used for the hip, knee, and foot/ankle, consistent with the available evidence-based literature.
    • Use appropriate manual therapy interventions to augment a comprehensive therapeutic exercise as part of the plan of care.

    *SOLD OUT - Manual Therapy Interventions for the Spine: A Laboratory Intensive Course, Part 2

    Location: San Diego Convention Center | 8

    Time: 8:00 am - 5:00 pm

    Speakers: Louie Puentedura, PT, DPT, PhD, OCS, FAAOMPT; Michael Timko, PT, MS, FAAOMPT; Adriaan Louw, PT, MAppSc, GCRM

    Level: Advanced

    CEUs: 1.7 (17.0 contact hours/CCUs)

    Preconference Pricing: Standard Plus (2B) 2 Day

    This 2-day, hands-on, laboratory-based course will focus on the use of mobilization and manipulation techniques for the cervical, thoracic, and lumbar spine, as well as the sacroiliac joint. The morning session of the first day will review the current evidence to support the use of the manual therapy techniques for the spine. The afternoon session of the first day will be a hands-on laboratory session focusing on manual therapy techniques for the lumbar spine and sacroiliac joint. The speakers will discuss the thoracic spine during the morning session of the second day. The cervical spine will be the subject of the afternoon session of the second day. Case studies will be used to illustrate the integration of spinal manual therapy interventions into the patient plan of care. The best available evidence will be integrated into all discussions and laboratory sessions. The intent of this course is to provide attendees with useful, clinically relevant information that can be immediately applied to various practice settings.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Select appropriate manual therapy techniques to address impairments identified for selected patient populations.
    • Recognize impairments, above and below the affected regions, that may contribute to the patient's primary complaint.
    • Safely, effectively, and skillfully perform the manual therapy techniques to effectively manage motion dysfunctions and/or pain of the cervical, thoracic, and lumbar spine, as well as sacroiliac joint.
    • Critically appraise the manual therapy intervention strategies used for the spine and sacroiliac joint, consistent with the available evidence-based literature. • Use appropriate manual therapy interventions to augment a comprehensive therapeutic exercise as part of the plan of care.

    Manual Therapy for Mechanical Dysfunctions of the Canine Lumbar Spine: Human and Canine Comparisons

    Location: San Diego Convention Center | 10

    Time: 8:00 am - 5:00 pm

    Speakers: Cindy McGregor, PT, PhD, OCS; Laurie Edge-Hughes, BScPT, MAnimSt (Animal Physio), CAFCI, CCRT

    Level: Intermediate

    CEUs: 0.8 (8.0 contact hours/CCUs)

    Preconference Pricing: Standard Plus (1B)

    Research suggests that manual therapy techniques provide mechanical advantages. These advantages include restoration of passive and active motion, improved nutrition of both cartilage and the intervertebral disc, changes in the metabolism of soft tissue structures, and improved rate and quality of tendon repair. Equally strong is the evidence demonstrating neurological effects of mobilization techniques. These include acute pain reduction and decreased muscle inhibition. Symptoms arising from disorders of the lumbar spine are more difficult and complicated to diagnose, with specificity greater than almost any other spinal level. The canine lumbar spine is prone to pain just as it is in humans. Facet joint dysfunctions are often not well-explored in traditional veterinary medical practices, but they can be a common clinical finding for canine rehab practitioners. Translation of human manual therapy techniques to the canine patient can be made once a comparison of anatomy is understood.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Identify anatomical similarities and differences in the canine and human lumbar spinal region.
    • Identify the mechanical and neurophysiological effects of mobilization.
    • Discuss selection of technique and manner of application, including grade and dose.
    • Take home manual techniques for assessment and treatment of the canine lumbar spine.

    Treating Scoliosis of All Ages: The 3-Dimensional Schroth-based Method to Arrest and Prevent the Progression of Scoliosis, Part 2

    Location: San Diego Convention Center | 7B

    Time: 8:00 am - 5:00 pm

    Speakers: Hagit Berdishevsky, PT, MSPT, SST

    Level: Intermediate

    CEUs: 1.5 (15.0 contact hours/CCUs)

    Preconference Pricing: Standard Plus (2B) 2 Day

    The Schroth Method for scoliosis treatment is defined as the best practice by the International Society on Scoliosis Orthopedic and Rehabilitation Treatment. It has been found to be an effective conservative treatment modality when used in the management of patients with scoliosis. The goals of this unique technique are to arrest and/or prevent curvature progression; maintain function; reduce and prevent symptoms of scoliosis, such as pain and pulmonary dysfunction; and raise patient self-esteem. This method is a conservative physical therapy approach that works with exercises that elongate the trunk, correct the imbalances of the body, and use special corrective breathing techniques to change the shape of the thorax and the imbalanced pelvis that have been effected by scoliosis. The speaker will discuss, demonstrate, and practice the principles of the Schroth Method throughout 2 days of lecture, laboratory demonstration, and practice. A review of the most recent literature will be provided, with a focus on the application of the method for outpatient physical therapy in the US. Topics will include classification, clinical evaluation, principles of correction, starting positions, basic exercises, and active-passive corrections.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Identify the clinical assessment steps performed during patient examination and screening.
    • Describe the Schroth Method classification for scoliosis and differentiate patients into therapeutic subgroups.
    • Identify appropriate physical therapy interventions in regards to the scoliosis curve angle/pattern, age, and maturity.
    • Differentiate between the Schroth Method principles: axial elongation (detorsion), asymmetric sagittal straightening, increasing frontal plane corrections, rotational breathing, and increasing muscle activation.
    • Determine exercises appropriate for the patient classification (eg, major thoracic, major lumbar, double major, with/without pelvic deformity)

    Tuesday, January 22

    An Evidence-based Approach to Strength Training in Breast Cancer Survivors

    Time: 8:00 am–10:00 am (See Program for Room)

    Level: Intermediate

    This is a joint program. See full description at Oncology programming.

    An Evidence-based Update on Management of Patients With Rotator Cuff Disease: Nonoperative and Postoperative Rehabilitation

    Time: 8:00 am–10:00 am (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Brian Leggin, PT, DPT, OCS; Martin J. Kelley, PT, DPT, OCS; Andrew Kuntz, MD; Gerald R. Williams Jr, MD

    Level: Multiple Level

    Rotator cuff disease is the most common condition affecting the shoulder, and its prevalence increases with age. Many patients respond favorably to nonoperative management. This session will provide physical therapists with clinical evidence to manage patients with rotator cuff disease and to understand the clinical factors that will lead to a successful outcome. When nonoperative management is unsuccessful, patients may opt for operative management. Current trends in operative management of rotator cuff tears will be discussed. Controversy exists regarding the early postoperative rehabilitation following rotator cuff repair. Early range of motion is advocated by those who believe it promotes healing and prevents stiffness; while others contend that delayed motion is ideal to promote improved healing of the repaired tendons. There is limited evidence comparing these protocols in a patient population. This session will compare and contrast the evidence supporting early versus delayed rehabilitation following rotator cuff repair.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Evaluate the pathophysiology and clinical presentation of patients with rotator cuff disease.
    • Initiate an efficient and effective nonoperative rehabilitation program for patients with rotator cuff disease.
    • Discuss the latest surgical advances in rotator cuff repair.
    • Compare and contrast current controversies in postoperative rehabilitation following rotator cuff repair.

    Unsticking the Stuck Worker: Efficiently Getting Back to Work: OHSIG Programming, Part 1

    Time: 8:00 am–10:00 am (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Jason Parker, B.HK

    Level: Intermediate

    Work-related injury or illness comes with a unique set of conditions that may prolong recovery and frustrate the worker, employer, and the physical therapist. This session will provide a set of evidence-based skills and strategies specific to assessing return-to-work motivation and determining risks and predictive factors for prolonged absence from work. These interventions will engage the injured worker, lowering resistance in returning to work. More important, this session will enlighten providers as to behavioral principles from social psychology and motivational science. Attendees will be introduced to a workable model that can be easily utilized and implemented.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Identify the significant predictive barriers to returning to work.
    • Recognize the factors that can predict workers having 3 times the odds of chronic disability.
    • Identify the 3 types of resistance to returning to work.
    • Utilize resistance-reducing strategies to help your client or patient become "unstuck."
    • Discuss work-related goals with your patient.
    • Engage the worker in problem solving.

    When Should Manual Therapy and Foot Orthoses Be Added to the Physical Therapy Plan of Care: FASIG Programming, Part 1

    Time: 8:00 am–10:00 am (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Thomas G. McPoil Jr, PT, PhD, FAPTA; Paul Mintken, PT, DPT, OCS, FAAOMPT

    Level: Intermediate

    There is growing evidence to support the use of manual therapy and foot orthoses as interventions to provide pain relief as well as an improved level of function for individuals with ankle and foot disorders. In this first of 2 sessions, the presenters will review the principles of a regional interdependence approach to the application of manual therapy to the foot and ankle, as well as guidelines for the selection of specific manual therapy techniques. Attendees will learn about the various classifications of foot orthoses as well as the best available evidence to determine the most appropriate foot orthotic prescription for various foot and ankle disorders.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Discuss those factors in the foot, ankle, and lower extremity that contribute to abnormal mechanical function of the foot.
    • Recognize impairments above and below the affected area that may contribute to the patient's primary complaint.
    • Effectively incorporate manual therapy and foot orthoses into a plan of care for patients with foot and ankle pain to maximize patient outcomes.
    • Describe the use of standardized outcome assessment tools to assess patient status or progress between physical therapy sessions.

    Aquatic Therapeutic Exercise for Patients With Multiple Complex Conditions

    Time: 11:00 am–1:00 pm (See Program for Room)

    Level: Multiple Level

    This is a joint program. See full description at Aquatic Physical Therapy programming.

    Consensus and Controversies in Rehabilitation of Rotator Cuff Disease

    Time: 11:00 am–1:00 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Lori Michener, PT, PhD, ATC; Phil McClure, PT, PhD, FAPTA; Charles A. Thigpen, PT, PhD, ATC

    Level: Intermediate

    Rotator cuff disorders encompass approximately 20% of all outpatient physical therapy referrals. Rehabilitation can be effective for the spectrum of patients with rotator cuff disease, from acute episodes of tendinitis to chronic, full-thickness tears. Emerging evidence suggests patients are likely to respond based on a number of factors, including history and physical presentation. Controversy exists over the optimal rehabilitation program, with respect to timing of rehabilitation, optimal dose of supervised exercise, home exercise programs versus supervised, use of manual therapy, and the type of manual therapy techniques. This session will provide attendees with the most current understanding of the mechanisms of rotator cuff disease, outline an approach to examination concluding in an accurate differential diagnosis, and discuss evidence-based interventions that include exercise and manual therapy for patients with rotator cuff disease. Areas of controversy and gaps will be discussed. Presenters will use current literature, as well as results from their published and ongoing research examining physical therapy outcomes for patients with rotator cuff disorders.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Describe the intrinsic and extrinsic mechanisms of rotator cuff disease.
    • Define the patho-anatomical and biomechanical characteristics of degenerated tendon.
    • Identify the key components of the patient history, physical examination, and patient-oriented outcome measures.
    • Integrate subjective and objective findings for an accurate differential diagnosis and resulting likely patient prognosis.
    • Discuss and implement evidence-based intervention strategies.
    • Evaluate treatment efficacy and effectiveness based on impairment resolution as related to patient outcomes.

    When Should Manual Therapy and Foot Orthoses Be Added to the Physical Therapy Plan of Care: FASIG Programming, Part 2 and FASIG Membership Meeting

    Time: 11:00 am–1:00 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Thomas G. McPoil Jr, PT, PhD, FAPTA; Paul Mintken, PT, DPT, OCS, FAAOMPT

    Level: Intermediate

    There is growing evidence to support the use of manual therapy and foot orthoses as interventions to provide pain relief as well as an improved level of function for individuals with ankle and foot disorders. In this second of 2 sessions, the use of the Foot Posture Index will be presented as a method to assist the physical therapist in classifying foot types in an efficient and clinically relevant manner. In addition, the use of adhesive strapping will be discussed as a tool to determine if foot orthoses are indicated as part of the overall plan of care as well as to determine the appropriate orthotic prescription. A clinically feasible and time-efficient method for taping the foot will also be described.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Synthesize and interpret examination findings, including the use of the Foot Posture Index (FPI), to guide clinical decision making regarding the selection of interventions for patients with foot and ankle conditions.
    • Describe the use of standardized outcome assessment tools to assess patient status or progress between physical therapy sessions.
    • Describe the use adhesive strapping as a treatment direction test to determine if foot orthoses are indicated.
    • Determine proper foot orthotic posting based on the results of the treatment direction test.

    Working Matters: Patients/Clients at Work—OHSIG Programming, Part 2 & OHSIG Membership Meeting

    Time: 11:00 am–1:00 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Jill Dulich; Karen Jost, PT, MS; Kevin Svoboda, PT; Rick Wickstrom, PT, DPT, CPE, CDMS

    Level: Intermediate

    On average, over 57% of Americans over 16 years of age are employed in some manner. Physical therapists play a vital role in ensuring that they remain at work. From injury prevention and consultation, to post-injury treatment and rehabilitation, physical therapists interact with workers to keep them working. This session will explore the variety of settings, services, and payment sources that you should be aware of as you support the working population. Learn from a panel of experts representing employers, insurers, and physical therapists about what matters when it comes to work.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Discuss the variety of opportunities available to physical therapists in relation to supporting the workforce.
    • Explain what is important to employers and insurers who are paying for your services.
    • Understand how physical therapists can influence the issues driving reform in the workers' compensation insurance system.
    • Modify your approach to working patients/clients.

    Core Rehab Without "Going There": Evidence Supporting Direct and Indirect Evaluation and Treatment of Pelvic Floor Dysfunction

    Time: 3:00 pm–5:00 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Elizabeth Hampton, PT, WCS, BCB-PMD

    Level: Multiple Level

    "Us versus them" opinions exist between some orthopedic manual and women’s health physical therapists in the evaluation and treatment of the pelvic floor as it relates to lumbopelvic and elimination disorders. This lecture addresses the prevalent and controversial conception identifying orthopedic and women's health being separate specialties in the treatment of pelvic floor dysfunction including lumbopelvic-hip, pelvic pain and elimination disorders. Does the evidence support core strengthening (transverse abdominis/multifidus and pelvic floor muscle contraction) as effective with verbal instruction, transverse abdominis palpation, and directed respiratory patterns in the treatment of pelvic floor dysfunction? Does clinician aversion to direct pelvic floor evaluation and intervention result in a barrier to providing adequate treatment to clients with pelvic floor dysfunction, pain, and elimination disorders? Evidence-based indications for direct and indirect assessment and management of the pelvic floor will be discussed as it relates to lumbopelvic-hip and elimination disorders.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Discuss multiple contributing factors to and comorbidities of pelvic floor dysfunction, pain, and elimination disorders.
    • Explore your own personal aversion, fear, and/or bias that could prevent the provision of appropriate and timely treatment of clients with pelvic floor dysfunction, pain, and elimination disorders.
    • Consider definitions and indications for direct and indirect pelvic floor muscle assessment and intervention.

    Dry Needling: An Emerging Technique in Physical Therapist Practice

    Time: 3:00 pm–5:00 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Jan Dommerholt, PT, DPT; Joseph M. Donnelly, PT, DHS, OCS; Timothy W. Flynn, PT, PhD, OCS, FAAOMPT

    Level: Multiple Level

    Dry needling is becoming a common treatment technique in orthopedic manual physical therapist practice. Although various dry needling approaches exist, the more common and best supported approach targets myofascial trigger points. Trigger point dry needling should be based on a thorough understanding of the scientific background of trigger points, the differences and similarities between active and latent trigger points, motor adaptation, and the application of pain sciences. The speakers will present a pedagogical strategy for including dry needling into an entry-level DPT curriculum and an orthopedic physical therapy residency program, along with clinical research strategies.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Identify key components of myofascial pain and dysfunction.
    • Compare and contrast various dry needling approaches.
    • Describe the differences and similarities between active and latent myofascial trigger points.
    • Discuss dry needling in the context of pain sciences.
    • Apply pedagogical strategies for incorporating dry needling into an entry-level DPT curriculum and orthopaedic physical therapy residency program.
    • Discuss current and future ideas for dry needling clinical research.

    Functional Testing Algorithm and Clinical Decision-Making for Return-to-Play Criteria for the Knee

    Time: 3:00 pm–5:00 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: George Davies, PT, DPT, SCS, FAPTA; Todd Ellenbecker, PT, DPT, SCS, OCS; James Irrgang, PT, PhD, ATC, FAPTA; Robert Manske, PT, DPT; Kevin E. Wilk, PT, DPT, FAPTA

    Level: Multiple Level

    The purpose of this education session will be to provide a systematic process, using one example of a functional testing algorithm (FTA), for returning patients back to sports with qualitative and quantitative criteria for upper-extremity injuries. This FTA provides support for informed clinical decision making when we have the responsibility to return patients back to sports with the least chance of reinjury and best performance. This process can be used for rehabilitation progression, terminal phases of rehabilitation for integration into strength and conditioning programs, and performance enhancement. Various case studies will be presented to demonstrate translational research applications of this FTA. Since there are limited level 1 and level 2 studies in return-to-play criteria, this course will bring over 100 years of clinical experience integrated with the best evidence.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Describe the components of a functional testing algorithm for the lower extremities.
    • Review the research literature to support the various tests used for clinical decision making.
    • Develop an appreciation for the need to develop a progressive criterion-based process to test a patients' readiness to return to play.

    Wednesday, January 23

    Dancers, Runners, Jumpers: Same Diagnoses, Similar Presentations—Unique Interventions? Part 1: Low Back Pain and Patellar Tendinopathy, and PASIG Programming Part 1

    Time: 8:00 am–10:00 am (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Jo Armour Smith, PT, MManTher, OCS; Kornelia Kulig, PT, PhD, FAPTA; Krissy Sutton, PT, DPT, ATC

    Level: Multiple Level

    This session will establish a biomechanical and motor control framework for the assessment and treatment of athletes who are dancers, runners, and ball players. It will provide sound, exercise science-based rehabilitation programs for these athletes using case study examples, and will discuss the process of designing an intervention program that addresses the needs of an individual athlete. Each case will have instrumentally and observationally based movement analyses that will guide the intervention. The presentations will emphasize translating the current "best evidence" to clinical practice.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Discuss the relative biomechanical and motor control demands of dance and running and jumping sports as they relate to musculoskeletal injury.
    • Compare and contrast the clinical presentations, interventions, and outcomes of common symptom-based presentations of a dancer verses a runner and a ball player in the following regions: Flexor Hallucis Longus and Achilles tendinosis in a dancer versus a runner.
    • Patellar tendinopathy in a dancer versus a ball player.
    • Low back pain in a male dancer versus a ball player.

    Genomics, Part 1—Linking Molecules and Genes to Clinical Practice: A Closer Look at the Spine

    Time: 8:00 am–10:00 am (See Program for Room)

    Level: Basic

    This is a joint program. See full description at Neurology programming.

    Hot Off the Press: Incorporating Evidence-based Practice Into the Continuum of Care After Total Joint Replacement

    Time: 8:00 am–10:00 am (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Joseph A. Zeni, PT, PhD; David Logerstedt, PT, MPT, PhD; Jennifer Stevens-Lapsley, PT, PhD; Lynn Snyder-Mackler, PT, ScD, SCS, ATC; Michael Bade, PT, MPT, FAAOMPT; Erin Baker, PT

    Level: Intermediate

    This session will incorporate recent research findings from randomized controlled trials, observational studies, and case series into patient care after total joint replacement, from day of surgery to discharge from outpatient rehabilitation. The presenters will focus on the investigator's own recent research as well as evidence-based guidelines to manage multiple aspects of patient care. The session will include discussion about recently identified impairments in muscle function early after surgery and methods to reduce postoperative strength deficits, persistence of biomechanical asymmetries after surgery and innovative rehabilitation methods to reduce asymmetries and improve function, and the importance of patient education and the need for the patient's commitment to personal care after community reintegration. Methods to engage older adults and specific challenges that may arise with a younger patient population will be discussed. The presentations will also focus on using clinically relevant metrics and web-based clinical tools to monitor and assess patient outcomes before and after surgery.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Identify best practice to manage patients after total joint replacement in the acute, subacute, and outpatient settings.
    • Identify asymmetrical movement patterns after surgery and use appropriate interventions to improve movement symmetry.
    • Address postsurgery red-flag issues.
    • Incorporate clinically effective treatments for some of the most common postoperative complications, including joint contractures and persistent muscle weakness.
    • Develop engaging and effective treatment plans that include age-appropriate goals and interventions.
    • Use the Delaware Osteoarthritis Profile Online, a free web-based tool used to monitor and track patient outcomes, and generate reports for patients and care providers.

    Taijiquan in Rehabilitation: Ancient Tradition, Modern Evidence (PM SIG Programming Part 1)

    Time: 8:00 am–10:00 am (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Michael Costello, PT, DSc, OCS, MTC

    Level: Multiple Level

    Taijiquan (also Tai Chi Chuan) is an ancient Chinese martial art and form of exercise with a long reputation for preserving and improving health. Chinese folklore is abundant with the stories of longevity and physical prowess among its practitioners. The movements of this art form, while appearing graceful and fluid, require balance, strength, flexibility, and precision. Recently, taijiquan has received a great deal of interest in light of growing evidence of its benefits. This session will discuss the use of taijiquan as a rehabilitation modality, reviewing research on the effects of taijiquan on parameters such as pain, disability, self-efficacy, strength, balance, proprioception, bone density, and cardiovascular measures. The presenter will use lecture, case study, demonstration, and discussion to show how traditional taijiquan principles can be incorporated into a rehabilitation plan with a focus on the management of orthopedic conditions.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Recognize the evidence for the use of taijiquan as a rehabilitation intervention for the management of chronic low back pain, arthritis, fibromyalgia, and complex patients with medical comorbidities such as cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and fall risk.
    • Describe the posture and movement principles of taijiquan practice.
    • Apply taijiquan principles to physical therapy management for patients with orthopedic conditions and chronic pain conditions.

    Dancers, Runners, Jumpers: Same Diagnoses, Similar Presentations—Unique Interventions? Part 2: Achilles Tendinopathy and PASIG Business Meeting

    Time: 11:00 am–1:00 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Jo Armour Smith, PT, MManTher, OCS; Kornelia Kulig, PT, PhD, FAPTA; Krissy Sutton, PT, DPT, ATC

    Level: Multiple Level

    This course will establish a biomechanical and motor control framework for the assessment and treatment of athletes who are dancers, runners, and ball players. It will provide sound, exercise science-based rehabilitation programs for these athletes using case study examples, and will discuss the process of designing an intervention program that addresses the needs of an individual athlete. Each case will have instrumentally and observationally based movement analyses that will guide the intervention. The presentations will emphasize translating the current "best evidence" to clinical practice.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Discuss the relative biomechanical and motor control demands of dance and running and jumping sports as they relate to musculoskeletal injury Discuss, compare, and contrast the clinical presentations, interventions and outcomes of common symptom based presentations of a dancer verses a runner and a ball player in the following regions: posterior ankle, anterior knee and low back; Flexor Hallucis Longus and Achilles tendinosis in a dancer versus a runner; Patellar tendinopathy in a dancer versus a ball player; Low back pain in male dancer versus a ball player.

    Essential Pain Knowledge for Physical Therapists: Recommendations From the International Association for the Study of Pain, PM SIG Programming Part 2 and PM SIG Business Meeting

    Time: 11:00 am–1:00 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Marie Hoeger Bement, PT, PhD; Mary Beth Geiser, PT, DPT, OCS; Kathleen Sluka, PT, PhD

    Level: Basic

    Academicians and clinicians, including members of the IASP Curriculum Task Force, will provide an overview regarding the role of the physical therapist in pain management based on the recommendations from the International Association for the Study of Pain (IASP). The major content topics include: the multidimensional nature of pain, pain assessment and measurement, management, and clinical conditions. Additional discussion will include innovative strategies for patient and student education.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Apply the IASP task force recommendations to rehabilitation and classroom settings.
    • Improve clinical decision making skills for acute and chronic pain conditions.
    • Identify references to assist with patient and student education.
    • Outline a syllabus incorporating the IASP recommendations for a standalone pain management course specific to physical therapy students.

    Genomics, Part 2—Linking Molecules and Genes to Clinical Practice: A Closer Look at the Spine

    Time: 11:00 am–1:00 pm (See Program for Room)

    Level: Basic

    This is a joint program. See full description at Neurology programming.

    Health Promotion and Wellness Through the Lifespan: How Can We Integrate Wellness Into Orthopedic Physical Therapy?

    Time: 11:00 am–1:00 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Pradip Ghosh, PT, PhD; Jack Bennett, PT, DPT, SCS, M.Ed., CSCS

    Level: Intermediate

    The incidence of chronic disease in the United States is increasing at an alarming rate. Evidence has shown that most of these diseases are preventable with proper health education and interventions that the physical therapist use every day, but motivating clients to adopt health promotion and wellness into their lifestyle is a challenge. Traditional interventions in orthopedic settings are generally geared toward improving movement through conditioning, strengthening, and correcting other impairments. How can you build an effective prevention and wellness program as an adjunct to traditional therapy? How will this program reduce the burden of chronic disease for your clients as well as reduce health care costs? This session will use lecture, case studies, and video clips to identify, examine, and assess the components of wellness and their impact through the lifespan from school-aged children through senior adults.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Describe traditional physical therapy interventions in management of patients with metabolic disease with special emphasis on osteoporosis and diabetes.
    • Explain types of behavioral modification and their impact in prevention of chronic disease and improving the patient's sense of well-being.
    • Implement available prevention and wellness strategies in physical therapy practice.
    • Identify and apply the concept of wellness and recognize its importance in improving the quality of life.
    • Incorporate health promotion and wellness concepts into traditional therapeutic interventions in management of patients with osteoporosis, diabetes, and osteoarthritis.

    First-Time Low Back Pain and Recurrent Low Back Pain: Recognition of Key Factors and Prevention

    Time: 3:00 pm–5:00 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Chad Cook, PT, PhD; Adam Goode, PT, DPT, PhD

    Level: Intermediate

    Significant effort has gone toward the recognition of concurrent biopsychosocial factors affiliated with acute, subacute, and chronic low back pain, resulting in a number of low back pain examination and treatment guidelines yet only marginal improvements in care. Identification of the biopsychosocial factors associated with first-time and recurrent low back pain has received much less attention, primarily because a longitudinal study required to capture first-time low back pain is costly and burdensome. In theory, if health care providers were able to identify those at risk of developing first-time and, subsequently, recurrent low back pain, preventive care could reduce the burdens of productivity losses, health decline, and economic costs. Recently, data associated with the Johnston County Osteoarthritis Project has demonstrated factors associated with first-time low back pain. Presenters will attempt to model a preventive approach by examining the current literature associated with first-time and recurrent low back pain and introducing novel research findings that have investigated imaging, examination, psychosocial, and demographic affiliates.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Scrutinize the merits and shortcomings of the current literature associated with development of first-time and recurrent low back pain.
    • Synthesize the present literature involving low back radiographic imaging and its relationship with first-time and recurrent low back pain.
    • Debate the contributory role of physical examination findings with low back radiographic imaging and its relationship with first-time and recurrent low back pain.
    • Argue the merits of a general psychosocial screen toward the development of first-time and recurrent low back pain.
    • Describe the recent findings associated with imaging, physical, and psychosocial variables toward longitudinal development of first-time low back pain (using the Johnston County Osteoarthritis Project).

    Using Best Available Evidence for Evaluation and Treatment: How Can PTNow Help Translate Clinical Practice Guidelines, Tests, and Validated Outcome Measures for Busy Clinicians?

    Time: 3:00 pm–5:00 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Tara J. Manal, PT, DPT, OCS, SCS; Judith Deutsch, PT, PhD, FAPTA; Airelle Hunter Giordano, PT, DPT, OCS, SCS; David Scalzitti, PT, PhD, OCS

    Level: Multiple Level

    The temporal gap between knowledge publication and application in clinical practice has been cited to take 12-17 years, and even then only a fraction of published content arrives at the clinical doorstep. Enhancing the translation of evidence to application in clinical practice is a goal of PTNow.org. PTNow provides illustrations of evidence-based practice through clinical summaries and cases richly enhanced with links to necessary tests and videos of test procedures and therapeutic interventions. PTNow also provides a clinically friendly pathway for accessing available evidence applicable to everyday practice. This session will provide quick updates on best evidence practice on topics including total knee arthroplasty, diabetes, Parkinson disease, ACL injury, Achilles tendinopathy, osteoporosis, hip fracture, BBPV, and COPD. Get fast updates and education on how to keep the important information coming to you in a clinically friendly and usable way! Multiple authors will be available to discuss their specific contributions to the site.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Identify areas of PTNow.org as a resource for up-to-date practice information.
    • Recognize best practice tests, outcome measures, and treatment interventions associated with a variety of common clinical conditions.
    • Navigate clinical summaries and cases to find evidence-based recommendations.
    • Use PTNow's Evidence-based Library to answer clinical questions and find critical practice guideline updates.

    Thursday, January 24

    Measuring Change in Canine Rehabilitation: Outcome Tools for Clinicians, ARSIG Programming Part 1

    Time: 8:00 am–10:00 am (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Cindy McGregor, PT, PhD, OCS; Amie Lamoreaux Hesbach, PT, MSPT, CCRP, CCRT

    Level: Multiple Level

    Lameness, pain, alterations in functional mobility, and quality of life are several of the most common reasons for dog owners to seek animal rehabilitation. However, a thorough review of the veterinary literature suggests that evidence-based studies on physical rehabilitation interventions for these outcomes are scarce. One reason is the lack of objective instruments to measure treatment response. The purpose of this session is to present options available in the clinical setting to evaluate specific outcome parameters at the individual or group level. Among subjective tools, 2 owner-completed subjective questionnaires with impressive reliability and validity will be covered as well as those to avoid. Among objective tools, a variety of approaches to quantifying lameness will be examined, including kinetic and kinematic systems. Finally, a new functional test based upon an idea proposed by Hesbach will be presented.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Identify owner-completed subjective tools for lameness that have strong psychometric properties.
    • Recognize subjective tools with poor testing properties.
    • Discuss the advantages and disadvantages of various objective tools for measurement of lameness, quality of life, functional mobility, joint integrity, or associated pain.
    • Determine the appropriateness of portable pressure and kinematic systems.
    • Discuss the Canine Timed Up and Go test in terms of indications, limitations, and metric properties.
    • Administer the CTUG and use the results to focus treatment on specific impairments.
    • Use a "toolbox" of subjective and objective outcome measures in canine rehabilitation practice.

    Running Injuries: Pathomechanics, Injury Patterns, Evaluation Considerations, and Intervention Strategies for the Lumbo-Pelvic, Hip, Knee, Foot, and Ankle Regions

    Time: 8:00 am–10:00 am (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: RobRoy Martin, PT, PhD, CSCS; Ben Keeton, PT, DPT, OCS; Richard Jackson, PT; Terry R. Malone, PT, EdD, ATC, FAPTA; Stephen Paulseth, PT, DPT, SCS, ATC

    Level: Advanced

    Individuals with running-related injuries commonly present to outpatient orthopedic physical therapy clinics. In order to properly manage these individuals, an understanding of injury pathomechanics is required. This course will outline normal and abnormal running kinematics and kinetics for the lumbo-pelvic region and lower extremity. The speakers will outline current research related to specific injury patterns for those with lumbo-pelvic, hip, knee, foot, and ankle pathologies. This course will also provide clinically relevant information regarding evaluation and intervention strategies for individuals with running-related injuries that can be integrated into every practice.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Summarize the normal and abnormal running kinematics and kinetics for the lumbo-pelvic region and lower extremity.
    • Integrate the pathomechanics with injury patterns for lumbo-pelvic, hip, knee, foot, and ankle regions.
    • Synthesize an evaluation and intervention plan for those with running-related injuries of the lumbo-pelvic region and lower extremity.
    • Given patient scenarios, integrate anatomical, biomechanical, and neuromuscular concepts relating to the etiology, examination, and intervention strategies for individuals with running-related injuries.

    Using the "Diagnostic Image" Tool in Your Toolbox: Clinically Relevant Radiology, ISIG Programming Part 1

    Time: 8:00 am–10:00 am (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Daniel Rhon, PT, DPT, DSc, OCS, FAAOMPT

    Level: Intermediate

    A musculoskeletal provider should have a robust clinical toolbox filled with various tools applicable to different clinical scenarios. The "diagnostic image" tool from this toolbox can be very powerful when used appropriately and in the right context. While having knowledge of the various imaging mediums, techniques, and capabilities is important; what brings the most clinically relevant value to those who manage and ultimately derive treatment decisions for patients is knowing when it is best to pull out and use this tool and what to do with the results it provides. Often the science and technical aspect behind the various imaging mediums can appear overwhelming to understand, but the decision of when to order and what to do afterwards should not be. In the same manner that one can safely and effectively drive a car without fully understanding how the various compartments under the hood operate, a musculoskeletal clinician can safely and effectively use diagnostic imaging, interpret its results, and base appropriate clinical decisions from it.

    This presentation will focus on the clinical-decision framework guiding the use, implementation, and interpretation of findings derived from diagnostic imaging to manage patients with musculoskeletal conditions. The unique aspect and focus of this presentation will be a discussion of the clinical management of multiple cases where a physical therapist ordered the imaging test, evaluated the image, interpreted the results, and derived a treatment plan based on the results. The information will be of particular interest to clinicians practicing in a primary care setting.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Discuss the relevance of diagnostic imaging in the overall picture of a thorough clinical evaluation.
    • Recognize the hierarchy of imaging test progression and its importance.
    • Discuss potential pitfalls of over and underutilization of diagnostic imaging.
    • Analyze the clinical relevance of imaging test results.
    • Discuss issues around the clinical scope of diagnostic imaging in physical therapy.

    Evidence-based Practice of Musculoskeletal Imaging in Orthopedic Physical Therapy: Hips, ISIG Programming Part 2 and ISIG Business Meeting

    Time: 11:00 am–1:00 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Joel Fallano, PT, DPT, MS, OCS; Aimee Klein, PT, DPT, DSc, OCS

    Level: Intermediate

    The use of musculoskeletal imaging is rapidly becoming an integral part of physical therapy practice as APTA's Vision 2020 continues to progress towards physical therapists becoming the gatekeepers for musculoskeletal injuries. The integration of imaging into clinical practice is essential for the profession’s progress towards this goal. The ability to read images and analyze the observations can assist the physical therapist in understanding the pathology and enhancing one's ability to educate a patient regarding pathology, etiology, surgical intervention, and the rationale for recommended interventions. The understanding of images contributes to evidence-based practice by improving diagnostic accuracy, determining optimal interventions, and enhancing clinical decision-making regarding when to treat and when to refer for a medical and/or surgical consult. This case-based session will review a wide spectrum of imaging principles, including the rationale for certain imaging modalities (eg, plain radiographs, magnetic resonance imaging [MRI], computed tomography [CT], MRI and CT arthrogram, rehabilitative ultrasound imaging) and the role and limitations of specific image sequences. Actual patient cases will be used and full sequences of images will be viewed to learn strategies on how to identify normal anatomy and common musculoskeletal pathology. Speakers will instruct attendees on how to integrate and apply imaging findings into their overall musculoskeletal clinical practice.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Define the role and limitations of various imaging modalities.
    • Describe and explain the rationale for the use of certain imaging studies when evaluating for musculoskeletal pathology of the hip.
    • Identify and describe normal hip anatomy as seen on imaging.
    • Differentiate common pathological anatomy of the hip.
    • Begin to integrate imaging findings into your overall musculoskeletal clinical practice through enhanced decision-making.

    Measuring Change in Canine Rehabilitation: Outcome Tools for Clinicians, ARSIG Programming Part 2 and ARSIG Membership Meeting

    Time: 11:00 am–1:00 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Cindy McGregor, PT, PhD, OCS; Amie Lamoreaux Hesbach, PT, MSPT, CCRP, CCRT

    Level: Multiple Level

    The protocol for Canine Timed Up and Go (CTUG) testing will be presented, along with various subjective and objective outcome measure commonly used in canine rehabilitation. Several of these tools will be provided to participants for immediate clinical use on a first-come, first-serve basis.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Utilize a "toolbox" of subjective and objective outcome measures in canine rehabilitation practice.

    Running and the Thorax: It's Not Just the Legs

    Time: 11:00 am–1:00 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Scott K. Siverling, PT, MSPT, OCS; Aija Paegle, PT, MPT, CFMT, CPI; S. Betty Chow, PT, MA, OCS

    Level: Intermediate

    Though recent evidence has revealed that spinal position and facilitation of postural muscle recruitment depend on one another for optimal performance, there has been little exploration into the role of the thoracic spine, rib cage, diaphragm, deep abdominal stabilizers, and pelvic floor during the running motion. Based on a biomechanical and anatomical foundation, the speakers will elucidate functions of the diaphragm, pelvic floor, and deep lumbar stabilizers and relate them to upright posture and dissipation of ground reaction forces through the spine and upper extremities during the running motion. Observed clinical patterns and pathomechanics of the thorax will be related to poor performance of the lumbopelvic stabilizers and the possibility of lower-extremity injuries in long-distance runners. Examination, diagnosis, and manual correction of thoracic/rib cage dysfunctions will be explained, along with appropriate exercise prescription aimed to restore the most efficient use of the thorax and improve postural control during running. Cases studies will be presented and discussed.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Describe the anatomical connections of the muscles and fascia capable of stabilizing the thoracic and lumbar spine, and the pelvis.
    • Describe the biomechanics of the thoracic spine, rib cage, and lumbar spine during the running motion.
    • Correlate the dynamic relationship between the diaphragm, pelvic floor, and deep abdominal stabilizers during moments of respiratory distress (eg, running).
    • Recognize the dissipation of forces of the thoracic, lumbar, and upper-extremity regions during the running motion, and the injuries possibly incurred from improper ground reaction force dissipation.
    • Adequately stage a graded program for thoraco-lumbar core strengthening—according to the patient's presentation—for the purposes of rehabilitation, injury prevention, and improved performance.
    • Gain insight for intervention design, using educational case studies, to improve the running motion by way of retraining thoraco-lumbar posture and costal expansion.

    The Effects of Thoracic Manipulation and Intervention on Upper-Extremity Impairment: A Regional Interdependence Model

    Time: 3:00 pm–5:00 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Jason Tonley, PT, DPT, OCS; Derrick Sueki, PT, DPT, GCPT, OCS, FAAOMPT

    Level: Multiple Level

    Upper-extremity pain is a common complaint by patients seen in rehabilitation settings. For example, the lifetime incidence of shoulder pain ranges from 6.7% to 66.7%, with these values increasing in frequency as patient age progresses—peaking at 50 years of age. Despite its clinical prevalence, the prognosis for patients suffering from shoulder pain can be poor, with 41%-55% of patients reporting persistent symptoms 1 year after initial examination. These statistics suggest that current management schema for patients with shoulder pain have been relatively unsuccessful. It is commonplace for clinicians to use treatment of the thoracic spine as an adjunct to traditional interventions focused upon the impairments in the upper extremity. Research is beginning to substantiate this clinical practice. While still in its infancy, a clinical link between the thoracic spine and upper-extremity pain, function, strength, and motion potentially exists. This relationship between seeming unrelated areas of the body has been termed "regional interdependence." While evidence for regional interdependence between the thoracic spine and the upper extremity is being established, very little is known about the physiological mechanism behind such a link.

    The purpose of this presentation is to explore the evidence that currently exists for a relationship between thoracic spine and upper extremity pain and function. Existing and proposed physiological mechanisms underlying manipulation will be discussed and placed in the context of regional interdependence. In addition, the clinical utility of treating the thoracic spine for upper-extremity pathology will be made evident through clinical case studies presented by current or recent graduates of orthopedic residencies and manual therapy fellowships.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Describe the current evidence that supports the link between the thoracic spine and upper quarter.
    • Discuss and articulate the clinical relevance of regional interdependence.
    • Interpret the main theories proposed to explain the physiological mechanism behind regional interdependence.
    • Discuss and articulate the clinical implications and utility associated with linking the thoracic spine and the upper quarter.

    Research and Clinical Practice updates: Low Back Pain ICF CPG and Introduction to the Research Network Program Initiative

    Time: 3:00 pm–5:00 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Joseph Godges, PT, DPT, MA, OCS; Steven Z. George, PT, PhD; Anthony Delitto, PT, PhD, FAPTA; Julie M. Whitman, PT, DSc

    Level: Multiple Level

    The International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health (ICF) is a unified model of functioning and disability that was recently developed by the World Health Organization. The ICF provides standard language and a framework for the description of health and health-related states in terms of body structure and function, activity, and participation in life situations. The ICF provides a useful framework to direct examination, treatment, and evaluation of outcome of conditions treated by physical therapists. In 2006, APTA's Orthopaedic Section undertook a project to develop evidence-based guidelines for examination and treatment of common musculoskeletal conditions, which were based on the ICF model. The purpose of this presentation is to summarize the status of this project, including presentation of the low back pain clinical practice. The speakers also will discuss the strategies to integrate evidence-based practice guidelines into clinical practice.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Provide an overview of the project to develop evidence-based clinical practice guidelines for the management of orthopedic conditions commonly treated by physical therapists.
    • Discuss the ICF terminology and how the interrelationships between movement, function, impairments, activity restrictions, and participation levels are presented in these guidelines.
    • Present several examples of published ICF clinical practice guidelines.
    • Discuss how these guidelines may serve as a resource to physical therapy clinicians, clinical instructors, clinical faculty, academic faculty, researchers, claims reviewers, and policy makers.
    • Discuss strategies for implementing these guidelines into clinical practice.

    Staying on the Right Track: Current Concepts in the Care and Prevention of Running Injuries of the Foot and Ankle

    Time: 3:00 pm–5:00 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Irene S. Davis, PT, PhD, FACSM, FASB, FAPTA; Bryan Heiderscheit, PT, PhD; Nicole Haas, PT, DPT, OCS

    Level: Multiple Level

    Running injuries are among the most common foot and ankle conditions managed by physical therapists. Sponsored by APTA's Orthopaedic Section's Foot and Ankle Special-Interest Group, the first hour of this program will provide the attendee with cutting-edge information on the biomechanics of running, and the effect of running technique and shoe gear on health and injury of the foot and ankle. Controversies in current research and popular media will be highlighted as they relate to clinical practice and concepts about optimal training for runners.

    During the second hour of programming, the clinical examination and management of running injuries by way of observational and video analysis of running will be highlighted. The second hour of programming will introduce the attendee to video analysis procedures that are relevant to the clinic, and how they may be used to guide prescription of running technique changes that can optimize ankle and foot health. In the third hour, the optimal evidence and clinical practices associated with running injury prevention will be discussed. The experience of an existing running injury prevention program will form the framework for discussion. Demonstrative case studies will be presented, and a panel discussion and question/answer period will follow the case study presentations.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Describe the current evidence related to the biomechanics of the lower quarter in general, and the ankle and foot specifically, during running.
    • Identify how running technique and shoe gear can influence running gait biomechanics and the risk for ankle and foot injury.
    • Discuss the process and equipment used for clinical running gait analysis by way of video-assisted technology.
    • Integrate anatomical; biomechanical; and neuromuscular concepts relating to the etiology, examination, and intervention strategies to prevent running injuries to the ankle and foot.
    • Formulate a comprehensive evaluation, rehabilitation, and prevention program for ankle and foot injuries related to running.
  • ADVERTISEMENT
  •