Archive: CSM 2013: Pediatrics Programming

  • This is archived programming for CSM 2013. See current programming.

    Browse Pediatrics sessions by day. Return to the main topic menu 

    Monday, January 21 | Tuesday, January 22 | Wednesday, January 23 | Thursday, January 24 

    * Should you choose to preselect sessions during the registration process, please be advised that preselection is not a guarantee of a seat. Attendees are asked to preselect to better determine room size and all efforts will be made to accommodate sessions in the largest rooms possible. All attendees are encouraged to show up to sessions early. Attendees are also encouraged to select alternative sessions in the event their first choice is full. 

    Monday, January 21 (Preconference)

    *SOLD OUT - Fit and Active Physical Therapy for Individuals With CP: Intensity and Outcome Measures

    Location: San Diego Convention Center | 33C

    Time: 8:00 am - 5:30 pm

    Speakers: Margaret O' Neil, PT, PhD, MPH; Kristie F. Bjornson, PT, PhD, PCS; Nancy Lennon, PT, MS; Deborah Thorpe, PT, PhD, PCS

    Level: Intermediate

    CEUs: 0.9 (9.0 contact hours/CCUs)

    Preconference Pricing: Standard (1A)

    Youth with cerebral palsy (CP) have decreased aerobic capacity, gross motor function, physical activity, and participation compared to peers with typical development. Aerobic fitness is critical for optimal health and functional mobility. Activity-based interventions may improve activity, fitness, and function in individuals with CP. "Dosing" exercise intensity using target heart rate may improve aerobic capacity and function in land and aquatic settings. The speakers will review the evidence on outcome measures and the effectiveness of "dosing" interventions to promote physical activity, fitness, and function in youth with CP. Recommendations on interventions will use the FITT principles (frequency, intervention, type, and time). The International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health (ICF) will be used to classify outcome measures for body function and structure, activity, participation, and personal and environmental factors. Attendees will work in small groups to design intervention and measurement protocols. A lab session will be conducted for attendees to get hands-on experience.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Distinguish between health-related and performance-based fitness intervention strategies and measurement techniques.
    • Distinguish between performance and capacity measures.
    • Design an intervention protocol (using the ICF) that aims to increase physical activity, fitness, and gross motor function in children and youth with CP.
    • Design a measurement protocol that measures physical activity, fitness, and gross motor function in children and youth with CP and that includes components of the ICF Model.
    • Identify which participation and physical activity measures to use and when to use them while examining outcome effectiveness.

    *SOLD OUT - Linking Structure to Function: Muscle, Bone, and Brain

    Location: San Diego Convention Center | 33A

    Time: 8:00 am - 5:30 pm

    Speakers: Jill Heathcock, PT, PhD; Robyn Fuchs, PhD; Noelle Moreau, PT, PhD; Laura Prosser, PT, PhD; Mary Gannotti, PT, PhD; Andrew Gordon, PhD; Thubi H. Kolobe, PT, PhD, FAPTA; Jennifer B. Christy, PT, PhD

    Level: Multiple Level

    CEUs: 0.9 (9.0 contact hours/CCUs)

    Preconference Pricing: Standard (1A)

    Rehabilitation strategies vary greatly due to vast differences in frequency, intensity, type of intervention, and timing (dosing). Intervention for children with brain injury provides an additional challenge to the pediatric physical therapist due to maturation during typical and atypical development. This course will explore the state of the science in dosing as it relates to children with cerebral palsy and includes 2 main topic areas: the musculoskeletal system and brain plasticity, which are both specific to dosing and early brain injury. Using the ICF (International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health) model, this course will familiarize attendees with the current research on the responses of muscle, bone, and brain to pediatric neurorehabilitation. The speakers will place an emphasis on strategies with established criteria for dosing—including frequency, intensity, type of treatment, and timing—with a focus on structural and functional changes in the context of lower- and higher-intensity protocols. Plasticity and recovery outcomes will guide the clinical discussion on how to use targeted interventions by applying best available evidence. Minimal and optimal dosing parameters will be discussed. The format for this session will include lecture and interactive discussions among presenters and attendees.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Discuss changes in bone and muscle that are associated with brain injury.
    • Analyze dosing parameters and protocols for improvements in muscle and bone structure and function.
    • Compare dosing parameters among rehabilitation protocols for pediatric clients with brain injury.
    • Differentiate between levels of evidence of effective interventions for muscle and bone adaptation.
    • Integrate the knowledge of dosing parameters from evidence-based research with clinical expertise.
    • Evaluate dosing parameters and their potential to change brain structure and function.
    • Articulate various mechanisms implicated in neuroplasticity in children with brain injury.
    • Apply relevant literature findings related to pediatric neurorehabilitation to functional outcomes in infants and children.
    • Differentiate between levels of evidence for known interventions for changes in brain structure and function.
    • Evaluate current interventions and their potential to influence structure-behavior change in children with brain injury.

    Tuesday, January 22

    Clinical Approach to the Evaluation and Treatment of Torticollis

    Time: 8:00 am–10:00 am (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Magdalena M. Oledzka, PT, PCS, MBA; Maureen C. Suhr, PT, DPT, PCS; Roger F. Widmann, MD

    Level: Intermediate

    By combining the latest available evidence with clinical expertise, this program will discuss the etiology, incidence, differential diagnosis, developmental assessment, sensory implications, and therapeutic interventions for children diagnosed with congenital muscular torticollis. Plagiocephaly and its implications will be discussed. The speakers will present guidelines for examination, progression of treatment, and discharge, along with the clinical use of manual techniques, taping, and bracing.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Describe the etiology of torticollis and recognize the differential diagnoses for torticollis.
    • Demonstrate an understanding of anatomy, kinesiology, and infant development as affected by torticollis.
    • Utilize examination techniques for assessment of torticollis.
    • Identify a variety of interventions for the treatment of torticollis.
    • Demonstrate an understanding of the principles of treatment progression and criteria for discharge.
    • Recognize the implications of CMT on infants' neuromuscular, musculoskeletal, respiratory, sensory, and integumentary systems.

    Gait Deviations and Treatment for the Ambulatory Child With CP

    Time: 8:00 am–10:00 am (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Lisa C. Drefus, PT, DPT; Sherry I. Backus, PT, DPT, MA; Melanie Buckland, PT, DPT, ATP, C/NDT

    Level: Multiple Level

    The musculoskeletal care of ambulatory children with cerebral palsy (CP) (GMFCS level I-III) is highly specialized and treatment is evolving. Gait deviations are common in children with spastic diplegia and hemiplegia, and it can be challenging to identify the primary versus secondary gait compensations. As a PT it is key to identify the cause of gait deviations in order to improve gait and functional mobility. This course will provide PTs who manage children with CP a better understanding of the principles of normal gait, gait deviations, CP clinical tests and measures, and musculoskeletal management. Observational gait analysis and an understanding of 3D gait analysis of kinematic and kinetic curves are needed in addition to the clinical examination to correctly identify areas of impairment. The gold standard for gait is 3-D motion analysis; however, this technology is not easily accessible in the clinic. Therefore, therapists need to be competent in visual and video gait analysis.

    The purpose of this course is to review normal gait, identify common gait patterns, including classifications of hemiplegia and spastic diplegia, recognize clinical CP tests and measures, and discuss treatment strategies. Rehabilitation emphasis is on: fine tuning gait analysis skills, identifying musculoskeletal impairments, developing effective treatment strategies to work towards improving gait, motor development, and function in ambulatory children with CP.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Review normal gait and current methods and interpretation of gait analysis in the clinical and gait laboratory settings.
    • Identify the 5 prerequisites of gait during visual and video gait analysis.
    • Recognize the 5 groups of saggital gait patterns in individuals with spastic diplegia.
    • Become familiar with common pathologic gait patterns and the four classifications of individuals with hemiplegia.
    • Distinguish key clinical tests and measures that correlate with gait deviations.
    • Discuss treatment strategies to improve gait in children with CP.

    Infant Brachial Plexopathy: Nonsurgical and Surgical Management

    Time: 11:00 am–1:00 pm (See Program for Room)

    Level: Intermediate

    This is a joint program. See full description at Hand Rehabilitation programming.

    Pediatric Practice Forum: Outcome Measures and Clinical Reasoning

    Time: 11:00 am–1:00 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Connie Johnson, PT, DScPT; Maria Benedetto, PT, DPT; Deborah Rose, PT, DPT; Heather Atkinson, PT, DPT; Kim Nixon-Cave, PT, PhD, PCS

    Level: Multiple Level

    Outcomes are used to measure progress of children across pediatric physical therapist practice settings. This interactive forum will explore the utilization of a variety of outcomes methods for clinical reasoning and decision making across pediatric practice settings, including early intervention, hospitals, schools, and workplaces. Presenters will share information and facilitate discussion and shared learning for use of outcome measures relative to the ICF model, clinical decision making utilizing the Physical Therapist Clinical Reasoning Tool (PT-CRT), and professional partnerships with stakeholders. A case-study format will highlight the interpretation of outcomes measurement as part of collaborative clinical decision making with children and parents. Attendees will discuss the practical use of outcome measures relative to the ICF and communication of outcomes in a way that empowers families. Use of communication skills to build collaborative partnerships with families will be emphasized. By attending this course, physical therapists will have increased knowledge about how pediatric physical therapists can use and communicate outcomes measures across the lifespan.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Discuss the use of collaborative professional partnerships with stakeholders related to use of outcomes measures.
    • Use the ICF model to describe outcomes measures that can be used across the lifespan.
    • Use the PT-CRT in patient/client management across practice settings.
    • Apply the PT-CRT as a guide to reflect on progress toward patient client goals and the effectiveness of physical therapy.

    Pediatric Yoga, Pilates, and Zumba®: Core Stability and Posture

    Time: 11:00 am–1:00 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Nancy Ferreira, PT, DPT; Denise Coleman, PT, DPT; Elizabeth R. Alfonso, PT, DPT, PCS

    Level: Multiple Level

    Attendees will be instructed in Yoga, Pilates, and Zumba® techniques that can be used in play activities with children. The instructors will identify and discuss common musculoskeletal disorders seen in pediatric populations and identify how yoga, Pilates, and Zumba® can address these issues. This course will provide hands-on techniques to enhance therapeutic exercises to increase core stability, breathing, and posture. Clinicians will learn to identify postural mal-alignments that can affect core stability and breathing. Such manual application offers a unique way to achieve improvements in strength, aeration, and alignment in children.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Identify and perform yoga techniques to understand the importance of breathing and proper body alignment.
    • Identify and perform the 5 principles of Pilates.
    • Identify and perform Zumba® techniques as a form of aerobic exercise to enhance strength, aeration, and alignment.
    • Recognize muscular imbalances that lead to poor posture and alignment.
    • Perform plumb line assessments and screens to determine postural mal-alignments.
    • Perform postures and exercises that can be applied to multiple patient populations to address core stability, breathing, and postural alignment.
    • Create a sequence of postures and exercise to be applied to a case study.

    Surgery and Postoperative Rehabilitation for Torticollis

    Time: 11:00 am–1:00 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Magdalena M. Oledzka, PT, PCS, MBA; Maureen C. Suhr, PT, DPT, PCS; Roger F. Widmann, MD

    Level: Intermediate

    By combining the available evidence with clinical expertise, this session will discuss the etiology, incidence, and differential diagnosis of congenital muscular torticollis (CMT). Ultrasonographic classification of the sternocleidomastoid muscle will be reviewed as a possible explanation for the failure of conservative treatment. The speakers will offer an in-depth explanation of surgical intervention for CMT, including subcutaneous tenotomy, Z lengthening, unipolar release, and bipolar release. Discussion will include postoperative rehabilitation guidelines including examination, assessment, treatment progression, orthotic management, and discharge criteria.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Describe ultrasonographic classifications of the SCM and its pathology to explain possible failure of conservative treatment.
    • Demonstrate an understanding of indications for SCM surgical release and the various surgical techniques used.
    • Discuss immediate postsurgical care in the acute care setting.
    • Implement a comprehensive postoperative rehabilitation program including appropriate treatment progression and criteria for discharge in the outpatient setting.

    Anticipatory Postural Control and Clinical Application in Children

    Time: 3:00 pm–5:00 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Gay L. Girolami, PT, PhD, C/NDT; Takako Shiratori, PT, DPT, PhD

    Level: Intermediate

    Anticipatory postural adjustments (APAs) and compensatory postural adjustments (CPAs) have been identified as components necessary to maintain balance when performing voluntary movement. Each of these postural strategies has a different yet significant role in postural control, and each is associated with a specific time frame in relation to a focal movement. APAs are feed-forward postural adjustments that are initiated approximately 100 ms prior to a movement and serve to minimize and offset the effects of the postural perturbation. APA research in adults is well-established, but until recently little was known about the organization of APAs in children with typical development and children with cerebral palsy. Recent research describing APAs in children deepens our knowledge concerning this component of postural control. Examining the evidence provides us with information to translate research into clinical practice. This purpose of this instructional course is to review the latest research on anticipatory postural adjustments (APAs) in children with typical development and cerebral palsy (CP), discuss translation of APA research findings into clinical practice and present ideas for management based on the research evidence.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Describe APAs in children and adults.
    • List similarities and differences in the organization of APAs in children with typical and atypical motor development.
    • Summarize the research findings that have immediate implications for clinical practice.
    • Apply those findings to design plans of care to address feed-forward postural control in infants and children with neurological conditions.

    Collaboration in Action: Evaluating Therapy Services Provision

    Time: 3:00 pm–5:00 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Eunice Y. Shen, PT, DPT, PhD, MS, PCS; Lora Woo, OTD

    Level: Multiple Level

    A large, multisite, outpatient pediatric therapy program embarked on evaluating its provision of therapy services. The program completed a strength-weakness-opportunities-threats (SWOT) analysis, developed a strategic plan, and created a new model for delivering services. The program made the commitment to be more family-centered by focusing on collaboration with patients and families to guide therapy, rather than one directed solely by the therapist. Staff training was provided on enhancing the collaborative process with patients and families that included the introduction of the Canadian Occupational Performance Measure (COPM) tool, and on leadership development for all supervisory staff. Two thousand and eighty-eight parents and caregivers completed the Measure of the Processes of Care for Families (MPOC-20) and the physical and occupational therapy staff completed the Measure of the Processes of Care for Service Providers (MPOC-SP). The extent of family-centered service provision was evaluated and the speakers will present the results.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Describe the systematic process in implementing an enhanced family-centered service delivery model.
    • Identify strategies to enhance collaboration with patients and their families in identifying needs, opportunities, barriers, and goals.
    • Discuss the process of evaluating and measuring the extent of family-centered services in a pediatric outpatient setting.

    Linda Crane Lectureship—From Silos to Bridges: Preparing Effective Teams for a Better Delivery System

    Time: 3:00 pm–5:00 pm (See Program for Room)

    Level: Multiple Level

    This is a joint program. See full description at Cardiovascular and Pulmonary programming.

    Stay in School: What Matters Most to Retain School-Based PTs

    Time: 3:00 pm–5:00 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Laurie Ray, PT, PhD; Carlo Vialu, PT

    Level: Multiple Level

    School-based physical therapist practice is a setting that, to date, has gotten little attention in the literature. In 2011 nearly 5,000 members of APTA's Section on Pediatrics, approximately 24%-30%, reported working primarily in public schools; however, a shortage of physical therapists for many school systems persists. This session will provide information from surveys from the practitioners that serve our public schools in 2 very different school systems: the New York City Department of Education and the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction.

    This session will approach the interpretation of the survey results in 2 ways. First, the presenters will discuss obstacles that the public school systems face in retaining therapists expressed in the survey results, including, among others, salary discrepancy, the itinerant nature of the job, overwhelming workload, and a paucity of professional supports and opportunities for advancement. Through group discussions, the speakers will challenge attendees on how to best advocate in shrinking these barriers, or minimizing their effects. Second, data will be presented on the percentage of therapists surveyed who have expressed the desire to remain in their current position. What are the most influential factors in these PTs' decisions to remain? The speakers will facilitate an audience discussion on ways therapists and school administrators can further enhance the positive effects of these factors to enhance a school-based therapist's sense of job satisfaction.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • List the top 3 common obstacles to retention identified by these surveys.
    • Identify the top 3 factors that influence retention for survey respondents.
    • Target areas amenable and feasible to change that would improve retention of PTs.
    • Generate 2 practical changes to improve retention in school-based practice settings.

    Wednesday, January 23

    Clinical Use of the Gillette Functional Assessment Questionnaire

    Time: 8:00 am–10:00 am (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Jean Stout, PT, MS

    Level: Multiple Level

    This session will demonstrate the process of translating research into practice by applying Rasch Analysis measurement theory research to the Gillette Functional Assessment Questionnaire (FAQ) and the Pediatric Outcome Data Collection. The presenter will use case studies to describe the integration of skill difficulty, classification systems such as the GMFCS, and measures of gait impairment to explain the usefulness of the tool in a clinical or school setting in providing direction for therapies and in counseling families regarding expectations of skill abilities.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Describe the differences in skill difficulty between typically developing children and those with gait impairment.
    • Explain how GMFCS levels and measures of gait impairment are related to walking levels and particular skills on the FAQ.
    • Discuss the how the FAQ may be used in the clinical setting to provide direction for therapies, as a screening tool, or as an adjunct in counseling families regarding expectations of skill abilities.

    Early Intervention: Promoting Best Practice

    Time: 8:00 am–10:00 am (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Lisa Chiarello, PT, PhD, PCS; Tricia Catalino, PT, DSc, PCS

    Level: Basic

    Providing services in early intervention requires the integration of the art and science of practice; it is complex and challenging, but rewarding. This session will provide practical recommendations and resources to foster best practice in early intervention. Based on research evidence and best practice guidelines, the presenters will link evaluation/assessment, program planning, and intervention with IDEA Part C legislation. You will be able to participate in discussions to promote a solution-focused, strength-based, and family-centered approach.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Describe the context of early intervention services.
    • Identify strategies for supporting the family and implementing collaborative care.
    • Access resources for evaluation/assessment, program planning, and intervention in early intervention.

    Physical Therapy Across the Continuum of Care in Pediatric Oncology

    Time: 8:00 am–10:00 am (See Program for Room)

    Level: Intermediate

    This is a joint program. See full description at Oncology programming.

    Building Communities for Knowledge Translation

    Time: 11:00 am–1:00 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Linda Fetters, PT, PhD, FAPTA, Susan Knight, PT, PCS

    Level: Multiple Level

    In this session, the presenters will define successful communities to support knowledge translation (KT) and encourage you to identify behaviors that are barriers to KT in your environment. With help from the presenters, you also will identify behaviors that would enhance KT and build successful KT communities. The session will include presentations of successful strategies that have been used by clinician/researcher teams to build KT communities.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Define knowledge translation (KT).
    • Describe the necessary ingredients for building a community of rehabilitation researchers and physical therapy clinicians.
    • Identify at least 1 strategy that could help you build a KT community within your local community (eg, workplace, professional organization, community).

    Evidence-based Core Stability for Children With Challenges, Part 1

    Time: 11:00 am–1:00 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Shelley Mannell, BHScPT; Julie W. Wiebe, PT, MPT, BSc

    Level: Basic

    The concept of trunk control as necessary support for distal mobility, movement quality, and efficiency has been widely discussed in the treatment of children with motor challenges. More recently, the term "core stability" has been introduced in pediatrics, modeling the research and programming with adult populations. However, children with motor challenges, including coordination issues, sensory processing deficits, and muscle tone impairments, cannot perform a standard core program and struggle to reap benefit from this approach. They still have the need for core stability, so how can pediatric therapists address this challenge? Part 1 of this session will provide an overview of how the core functions based on the literature for both adults and children. This will include an understanding of the interconnection between core function and motor development from birth to 12 months. Presenters will introduce relevant core assessment tools, which will enable you to examine core function in a variety of diagnoses. A brief overview of an evidence-based clinical model for the treatment of core stability in children will be provided.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Identify the components of the inner core musculature: diaphragm, pelvic floor, transversus abdominis, and multifidus, and describe the role of this inner core system in securing a stable physical center prior to movement tasks.
    • Discuss core components coming "on-line" in typical motor development.
    • 3, Discuss core dysfunction and compensations in children with motor challenges and implications for multisystem functioning.
    • Demonstrate clinically relevant core function assessment tools.
    • Discuss cueing and alignment support measures that maximize inner core function to prepare the center for stability prior to movements.
    • Recognize the possible ethical, cultural, and gender concerns regarding explaining to families a technique that involves the pelvic floor.

    Impairments Associated With Pediatric Brain Tumors and Implications for Physical Therapy

    Time: 11:00 am–1:00 pm (See Program for Room)

    Level: Multiple Level

    This is a joint program. See full description at Neurology programming.

    Improving Participation and Fitness in the Child With DCD

    Time: 11:00 am–1:00 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Donna Cech, PT, DHS, PCS; Deborah Anderson, PT, MS, PCS

    Level: Intermediate

    Children with developmental coordination disorder (DCD) are frequently referred for physical therapy services due to movement dysfunction that interferes with their ability to participate in age-appropriate play and recreational activities. Often the factors contributing to the motor limitations displayed by these children stem from sensory motor issues, poor organization of movement, postural control and balance difficulties, and poor motor planning.

    This session will focus on evidence-based decision making related to the evaluation and physical therapy intervention of children with DCD. The presenters will review screening and assessment tools, and individual and group intervention models incorporating task-oriented approaches such as neuromotor task training and cognitive orientation to daily occupational performance. Additional topics include: development of the sensory systems; descriptions of sensory motor development and dysfunction in children with DCD; and the impact of sensory motor dysfunction, postural control, balance, and motor proficiency on the level of physical fitness and participation of the child with DCD.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Describe sensory motor development in children.
    • Identify the key symptoms and characteristics of sensory motor dysfunction in children with DCD.
    • Select appropriate standardized measurement tools to measure the activity and participation of children with DCD.
    • Describe physical therapy intervention strategies to enhance sensory motor development, motor function, fitness, and participation in children with DCD.
    • Describe and discuss key points of the clinical practice guidelines for DCD from the European Academy for Childhood Disability.

    Treatment of the Pediatric Athlete: Lower-Quarter Injuries

    Joint Program: Sports Physical Therapy

    Time: 11:00 am–1:00 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Gabriel P. Brooks, PT, DPT, MSPT, MTC

    Level: Intermediate

    The session presents new strategies for evidence-based care of the pediatric athlete. Emphases include biomechanics, manual therapy, advances in surgical techniques, and outcomes assessment tools. Evaluation and treatment skills are presented for immediate application in the clinic. The pediatric athlete is complex; the presenters will demystify the numerous aspects of sports physical therapy treatment for this special population.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Identify epidemiology of sports-related injury in the pediatric population.
    • Select the most appropriate examination techniques for the young athlete.
    • Select rehabilitation techniques that are useful and effective for young athletes.
    • Discuss the latest research related to treatment of youth sports injuries.
    • Identify outcomes assessment tools and determination of readiness to play.

    Changing Practice in an Outpatient Clinic: Knowledge Translation

    Time: 3:00 pm–5:00 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Joseph Schreiber, PT, PhD, PCS, Brooke Racicot, PT, PCS, Ellen Kaminski, PT, MPT

    Level: Intermediate

    Pediatric physical therapists face many challenges related to the application of research evidence into clinical practice. An outpatient pediatric facility implemented a multi-component knowledge translation (KT) program to support practice change related to the integration of standardized tests and measures into routine practice. This program included the use of a knowledge broker/change agent, setting of individual and department-wide goals, multiple interactive workshops, online and hard copy materials, an online discussion board, monthly reminders, and program evaluation activities. The presenters at this session will share their perspectives—those of the change agent, department administrator, and clinical staff—on the successes and challenges of this KT program, along with baseline and follow-up data on knowledge and frequency of use of standardized tests and measures. The department director will speak to administrative challenges related to the program, and the clinical staff member will discuss specific cases that illustrate individual and clinic-wide practice changes related to the KT program.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Discuss key considerations for an effective knowledge translation (KT) program.
    • Evaluate the impact of the KT program on knowledge and frequency of use related to standardized tests and measures based on baseline and follow-up data.
    • Develop a KT program to improve the integration of knowledge gathered through continuing education and/or from research evidence into routine clinical practice.
    • Address administrative issues related to KT program implementation.
    • Describe the impact of the KT program on routine practice behavior and clinical decision making.

    Evidence-based Core Stability for Children With Challenges, Part 2

    Time: 3:00 pm–5:00 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Shelley Mannell, BHScPT; Julie W. Wiebe, PT, MPT, BSc

    Level: Basic

    Although the term "core stability" has been introduced in pediatrics, modeling the research and programs in adult populations, children with motor challenges often cannot perform a standard core program and struggle to reap benefits from this approach. Yet they still have the need for core stability. How can pediatric PTs address this challenge? Part 1 of this 2-part session provided an overview of core function, core development in the first year of life, and clinical tops for assessment. Part 2 will draw on this expanded understanding of core function to present an alternative clinical model designed for the pediatric population. Combining alignment interventions with the use of the respiratory diaphragm as the access point for the inner core system will give practitioners new tools for core recruitment within movement, function, and play. Demonstrations, activities, and patient scenarios will give you ample opportunity to interact with the material. Finally, a case study will demonstrate the use of the clinical model for treatment of posture and function in a child with cerebral palsy.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Review core function and compensations in children with motor challenges and implications for multi-system functioning.
    • Analyze neutral pelvis and rib cage alignment, which is essential to optimizing "inner and outer core" function within functional movement patterns.
    • Discuss cueing for alignment support measures that maximize inner core function to prepare the centre for stability prior to movements.
    • Describe the link between "inner and outer core" muscles to promote proximal-to-distal stability, improved posture, balance, and functional motor skills.
    • Recognize the possible ethical, cultural, and gender concerns regarding explaining to families a technique that involves the pelvic floor.

    Rehabilitation of Children on Ventricular Assist Devices

    Joint Program: Cardiovascular and Pulmonary

    Time: 3:00 pm–5:00 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Robin C. Rae, PT, MS

    Level: Multiple Level

    The use of ventricular assist devices (VADs) is becoming increasingly prevalent within the pediatric population as a bridge to transplant and for overall recovery. As such, it is essential that physical therapists remain current on the associated information and research in order to provide evidence- based quality care. Physical therapists play a crucial role in the medical management of these patients prior to, during, and post implantation, with a goal of improving the overall quality of life throughout their hospital experience. This session will cover the most common pediatric diagnoses that necessitate the implantation of a VAD and the physical therapy goals/interventions associated with these patients. The presenters will discuss specific physical therapy interventions and goals across the spectrum of the pediatric population. A brief overview of age-appropriate VADs, including but not limited to Berlin Heart, HeartMate II, and HeartWare, as well as their impact on rehabilitation, will be provided.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • List the common diagnoses leading to implantation of VADs.
    • Identify the physical therapy needs and treatment goals of pediatric patients on VADs.
    • Explain the differences between types of VADs as they relate to physical therapy interventions.
    • Recognize the precautions and contraindications for providing physical therapy services to pediatric patients on VADs
    • Acknowledge the important role of the physical therapist within the interdisciplinary team to provide the highest possible quality of care.

    Writing Systematic Reviews for Publication

    Time: 3:00 pm–5:00 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Ann VanSant, PT, PhD

    Level: Intermediate

    This session will focus on the writing of systematic reviews for publication. The presenter will use the PRISMA statement to describe the organizational structure of manuscripts incorporating a systematic review, and will discuss the necessary elements to be included in the review. The session will conclude with an overview of the process of preparing your work for publication.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Develop a clearly stated research question in PICO format that will guide the systematic review.
    • Use the PRISMA statement as a guideline for undertaking and organizing a systematic review for publication.
    • Use the instructions to authors for Pediatric Physical Therapy to prepare and submit a manuscript for review.
    • Describe the process of submitting an article for publication, responding to reviewers' comments to revise and resubmit a manuscript.

    Thursday, January 24

    Pharmacology Considerations for Pediatric Physical Therapy

    Time: 8:00 am–10:00 am (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Robert Barnhart, PT, ScDPT, PCS, Peter C. Panus, PT, PhD

    Level: Multiple Level

    Your practice is affected by the drugs your patients take. The administration of these drugs may or may not be related to the physical therapy activities of the patient. However, these drugs have the potential to either enhance or impede your physical therapy activities. The purpose of this course is to identify 3 separate pediatric populations in which polypharmacy may affect physical therapy outcomes. These pediatric populations are children with seizures and spasticity. A review of the pathophysiologies will precede a discussion of the pharmacologic treatment, identifying major pharmacologic classes with mechanisms of action and clinically relevant pharmacokinetics. The speakers will discuss the potential benefits and limitations of these drugs to physical therapy activities. The application of this information will be reinforced by case studies at the end of each section.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Recognize the underlying pathophysiologies and clinical presentation of spasticity and seizures.
    • Identify the major pharmacologic classes and protypical examples of drugs used to treat the above pathophysiologies.
    • Describe the basic concepts of pharmacokinetics and how these may interfere with or enhance pediatric physical therapy activities.
    • Outline the potential benefits and adverse effects of these drugs in relation to physical therapy activities.
    • Apply knowledge gained in the course to the clinical case studies.

    Physical Therapy and Cystic Fibrosis: A Successful Team From Birth to Healthy Aging! Part 1

    Time: 8:00 am–10:00 am (See Program for Room)

    Level: Multiple Level

    This is a joint program. See full description at Cardiovascular and Pulmonary programming.

    Roll With the Punches: Wheelchair Boxing and Martial Arts

    Time: 8:00 am–10:00 am (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Mary Gannotti, PT, PhD; Ian Cannon; Matt Phinney

    Level: Basic

    Individuals with chronic disability, such as cerebral palsy, who use wheelchairs are at greater risk than their peers for secondary conditions associated with a sedentary lifestyle, including decreased muscle mass, poor aerobic conditioning, low bone mineral density, and depression. Innovative programs to address the unique physical abilities of individuals who use wheelchairs and severe motor disability are lacking. This session will review the importance of physical therapists incorporating health and wellness activities in care plans for individuals with severe motor limitations, review the current state of the science on strengthening and conditioning principles for individuals with cerebral palsy, and describe an innovative exercise program: "Roll With the Punches."

    "Roll With the Punches" was developed by an individual with nonambulatory spastic quadriplegia cerebral palsy in collaboration with trainers from combat sports, such as boxing and mixed martial arts. "Roll With the Punches" training program includes progressive resistive exercise training, core strengthening, flexibility, and functional skill training. A case study will highlight the impact of this exercise program on bone density, flexibility, strength, activity level, and participation in society. Attendees will be instructed in the principles of the training program and be exposed to ways to apply these principles to individuals with varying levels of physical ability.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Recognize why strengthening and conditioning is a vital component of health, wellness, and quality of life for individuals with severe motor disability.
    • Describe the underlying principles and components of the "Roll With the Punches" training program.
    • Apply the principles of the "Roll With the Punches" training program to individuals with varying levels of physical ability.

    Dianne Cherry Forum: Best Practices in Pediatric Physical Therapy Education

    Joint Program: Education

    Time: 11:00 am–1:00 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Kathy Martin, PT, DHS; Joseph Schreiber, PT, PhD, PCS; Mary Jane Rapport, PT, DPT, PhD; Jennifer Furze, PT, DPT, PCS

    Level: Multiple Level

    The Section on Pediatrics held an Education Summit in July of 2012 that brought together various stakeholders to discuss best practices in professional pediatric physical therapy education. This session will focus on sharing and discussing some of the key concepts and products that resulted from the summit, including what should be taught, how should it be taught, how should teaching and learning be assessed, pediatric clinical education issues, and strategies to develop and maintain qualified pediatric faculty.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Describe the resources available to support the provision of optimal professional pediatric physical therapy education.
    • Analyze and evaluate current resources for the development of academic and clinical faculty, and describe strategies for the support of existing faculty.
    • Examine strategies for optimal teaching and learning as well as methods to assess student outcomes.
    • Discuss the unique challenges in pediatric clinical education, and identify strategies to meet those challenges.

    Examination and Treatment of the Patient With Skeletal Dyplasia

    Time: 11:00 am–1:00 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Frances Baratta-Ziska, PT, MS, PCS; Cathleen L. Raggio, MD

    Level: Basic

    There are over 350 distinct types of skeletal dysplasias—a heterogenous group of genetic disorders characterized by differences in the size and shape of the limbs, trunk, and/or skull that often affect stature in a significant number of individuals. Although individually rare, collectively there are a significant number of individuals with the various dysplasias. It is estimated that 14,000 to 27,000 babies in the United States are born each year with some form of skeletal dysplasia. Skeletal dysplasias are frequently associated with a range of orthopedic problems. These may include joint dislocation and scoliosis. Other health concerns may include respiratory, neurological, otolaryngologic, rheumatologic, gastroenterologic, endocrine, and/or cardiac issues. Specific topics that need to be addressed are genetic diagnosis, medical management, surgical intervention (when is surgery needed and how can it be done as safely as possible), morbidities of obesity, and psychosocial impact.

    This presentation will highlight the orthopedic physical examination, the relevance of various diagnostic testing in the diagnosis, and treatment recommendations for a patient with skeletal dysplasias. Recommendations regarding exercise will vary depending on the individual's medical diagnosis and precautions (eg, osteogenesis imperfecta, Marfans, achondroplasia).The multidisciplinary approach (ie, the orthopedist, geneticist, pathologist/radiologist, physical therapist, nutritionist, social worker, and patient) of The Kathryn O. and Alan C. Greenberg Center for Skeletal Dysplasias at the Hospital for Special Surgery works to design an individualized treatment plan for the individual with a specific skeletal dysplasia. As a result of participation in this course, attendees will be given the skills to provide appropriate multidisciplinary care for patients with skeletal dysplasia.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Conduct proper musculoskeletal examinations of patients with dysplasia and accurately assess function as it impacts patients' daily activities.
    • Recommend physical activity plans and appropriate nutritional requirements for patients with dysplasia.
    • Identify and address psychological and social issues faced by patients with skeletal dysplasia.
    • Appropriately refer patients to medical professionals for diagnostic testing or supportive counseling services.

    Physical Therapy and Cystic Fibrosis: A Successful Team From Birth to Healthy Aging! Part 2

    Time: 11:00 am–1:00 pm (See Program for Room)

    Level: Multiple Level

    This is a joint program. See full description at Cardiovascular and Pulmonary programming.

    Prediction of CP in Young Infants: Current Concepts and Research

    Time: 11:00 am–1:00 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Colleen Peyton, PT, DPT, PCS

    Level: Intermediate

    Cerebral palsy (CP) is not usually diagnosed until late in the first or second year of life. Early prediction of CP is important for identifying children who need close monitoring and follow-up. However, early identification of children with CP is difficult, and the accuracy of different assessment methods varies. Analysis of general movements (GMs), observable at less than 5 months post term, has been shown to predict the development of CP with a high degree of certainty. At this age, the characteristics of GMs change if there has been an injury to the nervous system. General movement assessment (GMA) has been described in several studies, and it has been suggested that the method also may predict the development of neurological disorders other than CP. Emerging evidence suggests that a computerized software tool also has the ability to predict cerebral palsy through video analysis of GMs. This session is intended for clinicians and researchers with the goal of understanding the current evidence and concepts surrounding analysis of infant spontaneous movement and the prediction of neurological dysfunction. Video examples of normal and abnormal infant general movements will be presented. The session is not intended as a general movement assessment course, but as an introduction to current concepts and research.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Discuss the history and evolution of infant neurological assessment and its clinical implication.
    • Explain neural mechanisms behind spontaneous movements in the infant.
    • Describe normal and abnormal forms of infant general movements and their predictive value for neurological impairment.
    • Discuss current research regarding prediction of cerebral palsy in the infant through analysis of spontaneous movement.

    Diagnosis Dialogue for PTs in the Neurology and Pediatrics Sections

    Joint Program: Neurology

    Time: 3:00 pm–5:00 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Kathy Martin, PT, DHS; Patricia Scheets, PT, DPT, NCS; Edelle Field-Fote, PT, PhD; Sally Westcott McCoy, PT, PhD; Barbara J. Norton, PT, PhD, FAPTA

    Level: Multiple Level

    Success in achieving Vision 2020 depends, at least in part, on physical therapists being able to diagnose conditions that are within the scope of their practice and consistently using commonly understood terminology for describing the conditions that affect the movement system of their patients. Specialists have the expertise needed to lead the profession in defining, labeling, and cataloging the diagnoses that are relevant to physical therapists’ practice. The primary purpose of this session is to engage specialty section members in a collegial dialogue about what "labels" should be used for the conditions that physical therapists diagnose. An introduction to some of the issues will be provided in a brief summary of 9 prior meetings about diagnosis. Case descriptions of 4 patients will be presented to provide the context for dialogue with members of the audience.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Recognize how standardized terminology promotes best clinical practice.
    • Discuss the issues and challenges facing our profession regarding diagnosis in physical therapy.
    • Describe how patients would benefit from widespread, consistent use of commonly understood terminology for diagnosing conditions that are managed by physical therapists.
    • Appreciate the potential impact on practice and research of describing the movement-related problems that affect our patients.

    Pediatric Differential Diagnosis: When the Duck Does Not Quack

    Time: 3:00 pm–5:00 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Mary E. Parker, PT, PhD, NCS, PCS

    Level: Basic

    Physical therapists accept referrals of individuals with a variety of descriptive diagnoses that do not define the underlying etiology of the disorder. Failure to thrive, developmental delay, and hypotonia are all descriptive, but not definitive. To optimize treatment outcomes, physical therapists must research and employ a variety of tools to determine the most effective treatments for their patients. While models of disability and frameworks for evaluation and treatment exist, there are few tools that assist physical therapists in differential diagnosis, especially with complex multisystem disorders. The goal of this course is to provide physical therapists with tools for differential diagnosis of patient with complex multisystem disorders. Included in this review will be mitochondrial disorders and leukodystrophies.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Identify clinical indicators that are not exclusive to known pathologies, and discuss the pros and cons of using these terms in patient description, eg, hypotonia, failure to thrive, autism, developmental delay, cerebral palsy.
    • Review the concept of regression as it pertains to a variety of disorders, eg, Rett syndrome.
    • Discuss differential diagnosis in pediatric therapy and resources to assist clinicians in correct assessments and treatment for complex multisystem metabolic disorders, including mitochondrial disorders.
    • Define what a "dump diagnosis" is and the pros and cons to the use of this category.
    • Access resources for clinicians to assist patients and their families with appropriate referrals and support in their diagnostic journey.

    Showcasing Your Professional Journey Through an e-Portfolio

    Time: 3:00 pm–5:00 pm (See Program for Room)

    Speakers: Catherine Maher, PT, DPT; Genevieve Pinto Zipp, PT, EdD; Susan Simpkins, PT, EdD

    Level: Multiple Level

    In today's market place, you can stand out by marketing your skills and accomplishments via the development of your professional portfolio. As a descriptive of professional's strengths and accomplishments, a portfolio is based upon facts, evidence, and self-reflection. It reveals the scope and quality of a professional’s performance within clinical practice, teaching, service, management, publications, grants, and collegial recommendations. A portfolio is a selection of items that offer a boarder picture of a professional's contributions than curriculum vitae or reference letters. The portfolio may be used for initial employment opportunities or professional advancement. What should be included in your portfolio? Strong portfolios should begin with a statement that describes your philosophy regarding the focus of the portfolio. It should reflect the author's professional development, whether it is teaching, management, research, or clinical practice. Portfolios should end with goal developments that outline what direction the author plans to take to develop their skills. The process involved in the development of a portfolio is an engaging one, and it enables you to reflect upon your journey and design a future both professionally and personally rewarding. This presentation will explore the "how to" and "why" regarding portfolio development and allow you to showcase yourself no matter where you are professionally.

    Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:

    • Discuss the tenets associated with portfolio development.
    • Describe a model for development and use of a portfolio for clinicians, faculty, managers, and students.
    • Develop a professional portfolio.
    • Identify potential options within your professional work-setting arena for the infusion of a portfolio.
    • Discuss evidence currently available with regard to the use of portfolios within a professional's journey.
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