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  • The Good Stuff: Members and the Profession in the Media, October 2019

    "The Good Stuff" is an occasional series that highlights recent media coverage of physical therapy and APTA members, with an emphasis on good news and stories of how individual PTs and PTAs are transforming health care and society every day. Enjoy!

    Quotable: “She pushes me almost to the limit every time I have physical therapy, which is twice a week. I encourage her to give me all I can take.” – Former President Jimmy Carter on the importance of physical therapy—and his PT—to his health at age 95. (Atlanta Journal Constitution)

    Honoring the "silent teachers": Tyler Tice, SPT, was among the University of Delaware College of Health Sciences students who spearheaded an effort to create an on-campus labyrinth honoring anatomical donors to the school. (University of Delaware UDNews)

    What lies beneath: Theresa Marko, PT, DPT, MS, describes the musculature that surfaces as sought-after "V-line abs"—after dietary change and a little exercise, of course. (openfit.com)

    Healthily ever after: Jenna Kantor, PT, DPT, is cofounder of Fairytale Physical Therapy, a program that incorporates theater and physical therapy in children's hospitals. (Good Morning America)

    Snooze, you win: Justin Ho, PT, DPT, outlines the importance of adequate sleep on overall health. (425 magazine)

    Getting out of a slump: Laurie Bell, PT, offers tips on attaining better posture. (Coshocton, Ohio Tribune)

    Aging should be a moving experience: Marion Marx, PT, age 90, helps her senior living community neighbors stay active. (Piedmont, California Patch)

    Putting a fine point on it: Josh Smith, PT, explains what dry needling's all about. (Lewes, Delaware Cape-Gazette)

    In sickness and in running shorts: David Ryland, SPT, managed to work in a marathon relay race on his wedding day—and his team earned second place. (Akron, Ohio Beacon Journal)

    Quotable: "Two minutes of being in there ... she knew. She put my arm up in the air and felt around and held my pulse. ... My pulse was just completely gone in my hand." – Madison Stoffel, a swimmer who experienced thoracic outlet syndrome that went undiagnosed—until she visited a PT. (Arlington Heights, Illinois Daily Herald)

    Got some good stuff? Let us know. Send a link to troyelliott@apta.org.