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  • Your Help Needed to Guide Movement System Integration

    APTA is leading the way in advancing the integration of the movement system as the core of physical therapist (PT) practice, education, and research. Now the association needs input from you to take an important next step: making the crucial leap from the conceptual to the practical through the development of a movement system diagnosis framework and movement screen.

    Draft diagnosis and screening templates have been created by the Movement System task force and work groups, and APTA would like you to take them for a test drive and provide your comments by the June 1, 2019, deadline.

    "We're at an exciting point in the evolution of the movement system concept and now need the widest possible stakeholder input," said Sue Whitney, PT, PhD, APTA Board of Directors member and chair of the Movement System Task Force. "Many PTs have been incorporating movement system concepts into their practice and teaching for some time now, but the development of these diagnosis and screening resources has the potential to accelerate the adoption of these concepts across the profession. That's why participation in the review and comment process is so critical—with the development of a repository of movement system diagnoses and the development of the screening templates, we hope to move the bar and create excitement about using the movement system in daily practice."

    Evaluation of each template involves a 2-step process. For the diagnosis template, reviewers are asked to submit an example of a movement system diagnosis using a specially developed online form, and then provide feedback about the template itself. The movement screen—a tool that helps PTs identify patient movement impairments observed during functional tasks and activities so that they can pinpoint which additional tests and measures should be brought into play—doesn't need to be filled out, just reviewed and evaluated through an accompanying survey. Click here to view the templates and provide your feedback.

    Work toward the development of the movement system concept in the physical therapy profession began in 2013, when APTA adopted a new vision statement with guiding principles that characterized the system as "the foundation of optimizing movement to improve the health of society." The association produced a white paper on the movement system in 2015 and held a Movement System Summit in 2016 that brought together 100 thought leaders to discuss how best to integrate the system throughout all facets of the profession. Since then, members of APTA’s Movement System Task Force have been developing resources to make widespread integration a reality.

    Want to learn more about the movement system? Visit APTA's Movement System webpage for a history of the association's work.

    Education Leadership Partnership Looks Back On a Productive Year

    When the purpose of a group is nothing less than "partnering to drive excellence in physical therapy education," you have every reason to expect that group to be doing, well…a lot of stuff. The 2018 annual report of the entities collectively known as the Education Leadership Partnership (ELP)—APTA, the American Council of Academic Physical Therapy (ACAPT), and the Academy of Physical Therapy Education (APTE)—shows how the group has been living up to that expectation while maintaining focus on important core values.

    The annual report recaps an important year for the collaborative group, documenting a year in which the partners took action on key initiatives around education research, including the approval of an educational research agenda, cosponsorship (with the Association of American Medical Colleges) of 2 medical education research certificate workshops (aka "MERCs"), the creation of an education research network, and the first-ever Grantsmanship and Mentorship in Education Research (aka "GAMER") workshop to help education researchers refine their abilities to secure grant funding.

    Education research wasn't the partnership's only area of focus, however. In 2018, the partners also held stakeholder meetings to develop action plans on clinical education, developed a framework to capture data related to physical therapist education, and provided a webinar and article, published in PTJ (Physical Therapy) on entrustable professional activities. Partnership members also formed a task force to address physical therapy program student debt.

    "It's been a busy year for the ELP," said Steven Chesbro, PT, DPT, EdD, APTA vice president of education, who helps to provide staff support to the partnership. "Progress in multiple areas is happening at a quick pace. The annual report provides a good snapshot of 2018, but we intend to keep stakeholders informed on an ongoing basis through the various partners' newsletters and other means—not only to maintain transparency, but to encourage as much participation as possible when ELP partners reach out for feedback."

    ELP comprises representatives from the 3 founding member organizations as well as ex-officio nonvoting members representing the American Board of Physical Therapy Residency and Fellowship Education, the American Board of Physical Therapy Specialties, the Commission on Accreditation in Physical Therapy Education, and the Federation of State Boards of Physical Therapy. Representatives from various areas of the clinical community—private practice, veterans, acute care, and health systems—also participate in the partnership.

    Want more information on the ELP, its history, and resources as they develop? Check out APTA's ELP webpage .