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In the wake of George Floyd's murder, APTA President Sharon Dunn defined APTA's position on racism: "We are against health discrimination…[w]hat's left to us — to all of us in our community — is to live those values through action."

Statements like this galvanize me.

I was once a school teacher on the north side of Milwaukee, a largely Black community located within both the worst city to be Black and the worst state in which to raise a Black child. I chose to change professions when I saw physical therapy's ability to empower through physical means. We make patients agents of change in their own health. In a society that houses systems of oppression, that marginalizes and disenfranchises, we give patients power.

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