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"The Good Stuff" is an occasional series that highlights recent media coverage of physical therapy and APTA members, with an emphasis on stories of how individual PTs and PTAs are transforming health care and society every day. Enjoy!

Quotable: "Let's not forget the basic hands-on part of our profession. Machines don't listen to patients. We have to listen to them." -Lifetime APTA member Bette Horstman, PT, MEd, who turned 100 on Dec. 6. (apta.org)

The pandemic and the pelvic floor: Sara Reardon, PT, DPT, offers insight on how the coronavirus pandemic may be contributing to increased prevalence of pelvic floor dysfunction. (Today online)

This is your brain on running: Marilyn Moffat, PT, DPT, PhD, FAPTA, shares her thoughts on a recent study that correlates 10 minutes of running with increased brain function. (Medical News Today)

No slouch at staying healthy: Karena Wu, PT, DPT, MS, explains how poor posture can affect overall health. (PIX11 News, New York)

The answer is YES: Rachel Walton-Mouw, PT, DPT, and Jason Reiss PT, DPT, were integral in the development of a new Arthritis Foundation program, Your Exercise Solution, aka YES. This collection of exercise videos aimed at helping individuals with arthritis keep moving was envisioned by Pamela Massey, PT, before she died. (Arthritis Foundation)

Loosen up (those hamstrings) already: Veronica Clark, PT, provides strengthening and stretching exercises to help counter tight hamstrings. (Well + Good)

Slowing the progression of Parkinson: Lee Dibble, PT, ATC, PhD, FAPTA, lead investigator for a new study on the ways exercise could help counter the progression of Parkinson disease, describes his research. (KSL 5 News, Salt Lake City, Utah)

When working from home isn't working for health: Benjamin Braxley, PT, DPT, discusses the ways working from home during the pandemic has led to deconditioning for some. (The Sacramento Bee)

Physical therapy and the long road back from COVID-19: Janette Menchaca, PT, outlines the ways physical therapy can be instrumental in overcoming limitations of COVID-19 patients post-recovery. (Bakersfield.com)

Quotable: "PTAs chose to do this and do not want to become PTs." -Jodi Pfeiffer, PTA, MHA, on the distinct role and value of the PTA. (Alaska Business)

Got some good stuff? Let us know. Send a link to troyelliott@apta.org.


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