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The end of the hard cap on payment for therapy services under Medicare was big news for patients and the profession—a fact that hasn't escaped the notice of The Washington Post.

The March 1 edition of the Post featured a story from Kaiser Health News on the elimination of the cap, which is described as a change "buried" in the federal spending plan approved by Congress in February, albeit one that "reveals much about how health care financing often gets done—or undone—in Washington."

The article recounts the birth of the cap in 1997, efforts to repeal it, and the regular scrambles to apply temporary exceptions to the policy. And to help illustrate the long slog that finally led to repeal, Kaiser reporter Shefali Luthra retells the story of an ambitious physical therapist who left his practice in Michigan and headed to Washington, DC, nearly 20 years ago to help advocate for an end to the cap. His name: Justin Moore, PT, DPT—as it happens, the same Justin Moore who's now CEO of APTA.

The unceasing advocacy efforts of "a small but impassioned therapy contingent" of APTA members, association staff, and patients is what "laid the groundwork" for the cap fix, according to the Post article. As for Moore, he's quoted as saying "I've got to figure out what to do next." Insider tip: he's joking.


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