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Could 'Bioresorbable' Sensors Help Individuals Recover From Brain Injury, Surgery?

Feature - HC Tech Today - Gear

They melt in your brain, not in your hand.

Scientists at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champagne have created a sensor they hope one day can be implanted in the brains of patients to monitor and wirelessly transmit data on pressure and temperature within the skull for a time, and then simply resorb into the body. Researchers believe the new approach could help make physical therapy less complicated for individuals recovering from brain injury or surgery (no more external wires in the way) and reduce the incidence of infection, allergic reaction, or other complications associated with implanted sensors that require external wiring and eventual surgical removal.

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