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A lot has changed in the profession of physical therapy since 1994, when Beth Domholdt, PT, EdD, FAPTA, conducted a question-and-answer interview on "Reentering Practice" for this publication's predecessor, PT Magazine.

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Back then, Domholdt — not yet a Catherine Worthingham Fellow of APTA — was dean of the Krannert School of Physical Therapy at the University of Indianapolis. The school offered a "clinical update" program geared in part toward "inactive" PTs returning to the profession after an extended absence. The most typical reason for those hiatuses, the article noted, was pregnancy and childrearing, with nearly 40% of female APTA members, according to the association's 1993 Active Member Profile Report, having reported one or more career interruptions of unspecified length.

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