Skip to main content

A lot has changed in the profession of physical therapy since 1994, when Beth Domholdt, PT, EdD, FAPTA, conducted a question-and-answer interview on "Reentering Practice" for this publication's predecessor, PT Magazine.

feature-reentry-350.jpg

Back then, Domholdt — not yet a Catherine Worthingham Fellow of APTA — was dean of the Krannert School of Physical Therapy at the University of Indianapolis. The school offered a "clinical update" program geared in part toward "inactive" PTs returning to the profession after an extended absence. The most typical reason for those hiatuses, the article noted, was pregnancy and childrearing, with nearly 40% of female APTA members, according to the association's 1993 Active Member Profile Report, having reported one or more career interruptions of unspecified length.

Log in or create a free account to keep reading.


Join APTA to get unlimited access to content.


You Might Also Like...

News

Fifth Annual Lynda Woodruff DEI Lecture Coming June 13

May 28, 2024

This year's lecture features Julian Magee, PT, DPT, ATC, leader of an innovative inclusion program at Washington University in St. Louis.

News

Noncompete Ban: What About Nonprofit Hospitals?

May 28, 2024

Nonprofits are outside of FTC's jurisdiction — but not if the commission says the organization is behaving like a for-profit business.

News

Historic Wins: Last Severe Restrictions on Direct Access Eliminated

May 24, 2024

Recent changes in Alabama mean that all states now have either provisional or unrestricted access to physical therapy without a referral.