Skip to main content

A lot has changed in the profession of physical therapy since 1994, when Beth Domholdt, PT, EdD, FAPTA, conducted a question-and-answer interview on "Reentering Practice" for this publication's predecessor, PT Magazine.

feature-reentry-350.jpg

Back then, Domholdt — not yet a Catherine Worthingham Fellow of APTA — was dean of the Krannert School of Physical Therapy at the University of Indianapolis. The school offered a "clinical update" program geared in part toward "inactive" PTs returning to the profession after an extended absence. The most typical reason for those hiatuses, the article noted, was pregnancy and childrearing, with nearly 40% of female APTA members, according to the association's 1993 Active Member Profile Report, having reported one or more career interruptions of unspecified length.

Log in or create a free account to keep reading.


Join APTA to get unlimited access to content.


You Might Also Like...

Feature

The Ethics of Value-Based Payment in Physical Therapy Models

Jul 01, 2020

Physical therapy experts take a look at some issues that must be considered in the movement to value-based payment models.

Feature

The Profession Responds to a National Health Emergency

Jul 01, 2020

Compiled by APTA staff from member submissions

Feature

Aiding the Olympic Dream

Jul 01, 2020

Physical therapists help athletes in their goal of successfully competing in the Olympic Games.