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COVID-19 survivors have an opportunity to better understand their path to recovery, thanks to an upcoming webinar on the role physical therapy can play in regaining health and mobility after COVID-19. The Facebook Live event, "PACE-ing Your Way to COVID Recovery" offered Jan. 15, 2-3 p.m. ET, is a collaborative effort by the APTA Academy of Cardiovascular & Pulmonary Physical Therapy and one of  the nation's largest COVID survivor groups.

APTA members Ellen Hillegass PT, EdD, FAPTA; Talia Pollok, PT, DPT; and Angela Campbell PT, DPT, will share their expertise with thousands of COVID-19 survivors who have connected with each other through Survivor Corps, a grassroots patient advocacy group founded by Diana Berrent, herself a COVID-19 survivor. All three PTs are board-certified clinical specialists in cardiovascular and pulmonary physical therapy.

The session will provide information to COVID-19 survivors on finding the right PT, recovery after deep vein thrombosis or pulmonary embolus, screening for post-viral syndrome, injury prevention, posture restoration, and optimizing movement.

Hillegass, Pollok, and Campbell are the creation and production team behind the PACER course series — the acronym for Post-Acute Covid-19 Exercise & Rehabilitation — that provides free educational courses presented by the nation’s leading experts to enhance practitioner knowledge in the rehabilitation of survivors of COVID-19. Courses are offered on the APTA Learning Center COVID-19 Catalog (search “PACER”).


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