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APTA is offering Virtual NEXT to provide outstanding continuing education at greatly reduced rates to support the physical therapy community during the COVID-19 pandemic.

APTA members get access to more than 20 courses with related CEUs, plus several special recorded sessions and live online events, for only $20. Nonmembers pay only $40.

Topics include COVID-19, pain management, telehealth, disaster management, diversity education, and leadership. Explore the list and course descriptions below.

Overview

Dates: The Virtual NEXT course bundle is available for purchase in the APTA Learning Center! All Virtual NEXT CEU sessions will be available on-demand starting June 3, 2020. Virtual NEXT is available for purchase through July 31, 2020. Those who purchase Virtual NEXT will have access to all courses until December 31, 2020, and will have 90 days to complete any individual Virtual NEXT course once starting the course.

Price: $20 for APTA members*; $40 for nonmembers. Purchase now!

(*Those who were registered for NEXT in Phoenix at the time of its cancelation are receiving Virtual NEXT for free, as are Life members and members in the first year of the Early-Career Dues Discount (formerly Career Starter Dues), who were eligible for a free NEXT registration. Check your email for details if you are a member of these groups.)

CEUs: More than 2.0 CEUs (20 contact hours) will be available within the Virtual NEXT bundle. CEUs will be assigned individually to each course and provided upon successful completion of a posttest assessment. Restrictions apply in some states.

Sponsors: Special thanks to GEICO, HPSO, and Rusk Rehabilitation for making Virtual NEXT possible at this very low price.

 

For Virtual NEXT Registrants

To view your on-demand courses, log in to the APTA Learning Center and select My Learning Activities.

Watch your email for invitations to the special live online events. Invitations will be sent approximately 24-48 hours in advance of the live event. Recordings of these events will be added to your learning activities within the APTA Learning Center.

 


Special Live Online Events

CEUs are not provided for live online events. Invitations for live online events will be emailed to Virtual NEXT registrants 24-48 hours in advance, so purchase Virtual NEXT now to secure your opportunity! The live online events let you submit questions and be part of the conversation. Each live online event has limited attendance (first come, first served). Due to the capacity limit, purchase of Virtual NEXT does not guarantee participation in each live session.

Can’t make a live online event? Recordings of each will be posted to the Virtual NEXT bundle in the APTA Learning Center within two business days and will be available to all registrants.

Additional event to be announced!

Join live to submit your questions to the speakers, Sarah Gallagher PT, DPT, Ellen Morello, Samantha Dutrow Norwood, PT, DPT, Todd Norwood, PT, DPT, and Christin Tate, PT, DPT.

This is a 60-minute event.

To view this live online event and submit questions you must be a Virtual NEXT registrant at least 48 hours in advance (see details above to purchase Virtual NEXT). A recording of this session will be made available for all Virtual NEXT registrants. Each live online event has a limited capacity of participants on a first come, first served basis.

Town Hall with APTA President Sharon Dunn
Friday, June 5, at 8 p.m. ET

 

Join live to submit your questions to President Dunn, who recently delivered her annual address to the House of Delegates. (See her addresses from 2018 and 2019.)

This is a 60-minute event.

To view this live online event and submit questions you must be a Virtual NEXT registrant at least 48 hours in advance (see details above to purchase Virtual NEXT). A recording of this session will be made available for all Virtual NEXT registrants. Each live online event has a limited capacity of participants on a first come, first served basis.

Telehealth—the use of technology to provide remote care—is an evolving and expanding method of health service delivery. As movement experts, physical therapists rely on movement analysis and the results of tests and measures to arrive at a movement system diagnosis, determine a prognosis, and implement the plan of the care. But how should telehealth be incorporated into physical therapist practice? Is telehealth most appropriately used in a hybrid approach, to allow the therapist to perform a hands-on examination? Or are there some populations and movement system problems that could be exclusively managed using telehealth? How should patient preferences be weighed when considering telehealth as an option? Is there any evidence available to help identify which patients might best benefit, or should we view limited access to care as the critical determinant in implementing telehealth options in physical therapy? Can the use of telehealth really lead to better or equal patient outcomes at reduced cost? Presenters will explore the challenges and opportunities surrounding the use of telehealth in physical therapy.

Join live to submit your questions to the panelists, Kathleen Gill-Body, PT, DPT, MS, FAPTA, Alan Lee, PT, DPT, PhD, Lori Quinn, PT, EdD, and Shirley A. Sahrmann, PT, PhD, FAPTA

This is a 90-minute event.

To view this live online event and submit questions you must be a Virtual NEXT registrant at least 48 hours in advance (see details above to purchase Virtual NEXT). A recording of this session will be made available for all Virtual NEXT registrants. Each live online event has a limited capacity of participants on a first come, first served basis.

Hot Topics in Payment - Live Q&A
Thursday, June 18, at 8 p.m. ET

 

Join live to submit your questions to APTA payment and regulatory experts Alice Bell, PT, DPT, and Kara Gainer, JD. View their related on-demand presentation to attain CEUs.

This is a 60-minute event.

To view this live online event and submit questions you must be a Virtual NEXT registrant at least 48 hours in advance (see details above to purchase Virtual NEXT). A recording of this session will be made available for all Virtual NEXT registrants. Each live online event has a limited capacity of participants on a first come, first served basis.

Join live to submit your questions to Nicole Stout, PT, DPT, FAPTA. View the related 25th Maley Lecture, available on-demand.

This is a 60-minute event.

To view this live online event and submit questions you must be a Virtual NEXT registrant at least 48 hours in advance (see details above to purchase Virtual NEXT). A recording of this session will be made available for all Virtual NEXT registrants. Each live online event has a limited capacity of participants on a first come, first served basis.

A Journey Into Diversity Education – Live Q&A
Thursday, July 2, at 8 p.m. ET

 

Join live to submit your questions to Anissa Davis, PT, DPT, Lee Ann Eagler, PT, DPT, Katherin Duong, SPT, and Samson Robinson, III, SPT. View their related on-demand presentation to attain CEUs. View their related on-demand presentation to attain CEUs.

This is a 60-minute event.

To view this live online event and submit questions you must be a Virtual NEXT registrant at least 48 hours in advance (see details above to purchase Virtual NEXT). A recording of this session will be made available for all Virtual NEXT registrants. Each live online event has a limited capacity of participants on a first come, first served basis.

Join live to submit your questions to Alan Lee, PT, DPT, PhD, Patricia Ohtake, PT, PhD James Smith, PT, DPT, MA, Alecia Thiele, PT, DPT, ATC, MEd, and Hallie Zeleznik, PT, DPT. View their related on-demand presentation to attain CEUs.

This is a 60-minute event.

To view this live online event and submit questions you must be a Virtual NEXT registrant at least 48 hours in advance (see details above to purchase Virtual NEXT). A recording of this session will be made available for all Virtual NEXT registrants. Each live online event has a limited capacity of participants on a first come, first served basis.

Formula for Community Inclusion - Live Q&A
Thursday, July 23, at 8 p.m. ET

 

Join live to submit your questions to Kimberly Castle, PT, MSPT, PhD, Susan Klappa, PT, MPT, PhD, SueAnn McCall, PT, DPT, Donald Walsh, PT, DPT, MS, and Rachael Walton-Mouw, PT, DPT. View their related on-demand presentation to attain CEUs.

This is a 60-minute event.

To view this live online event and submit questions you must be a Virtual NEXT registrant at least 48 hours in advance (see details above to purchase Virtual NEXT). A recording of this session will be made available for all Virtual NEXT registrants. Each live online event has a limited capacity of participants on a first come, first served basis.

Special On-Demand Sessions

CEUs are not provided for the following.

By 2030, there will be more than 21 million cancer survivors in the United States, representing nearly 7% of the population. Cancer treatment is provided over a protracted period of months or years, and for individuals with advanced stages of cancer this may be the remainder of their lifespan. Each medical therapy employed has side effects that negatively impact physical function. Through the protracted continuum of cancer care this leads to an aggregate burden of impairment and functional decline. Rehabilitation plays a substantial role in reducing this burden, and in enabling optimal function in individuals living with cancer. However, the reactive framework prevalent in today’s practice of physical therapy is ill-suited to meet the needs of this population. In the last decade a tremendous interdisciplinary effort has shifted cancer rehabilitation toward a prospective surveillance model to provide early, ongoing rehabilitative services to individuals with cancer and mitigate anticipated functional decline associated with treatment. While this model is moving forward as a standard in care, our profession should consider the opportunities that proactive risk stratification and surveillance can afford to other chronic disease states in which functional morbidity is anticipated, and in which prospective rehabilitation may prevent functional decline.

Worthingham Fellows Forum: Educating Physical Therapists for the Next Century
Gail M. Jensen, PT, PhD, FAPTA; Zoher Kapasi, PT, MSPT, MBA, PhD, FAPTA; David M. Morris, PT, PhD, FAPTA; Terrance Nordstrom, PT, EdD

 

In 2021, APTA will celebrate its 100-year anniversary. This forum will serve as an inflection point to inspire an examination of past progress, current challenges, and future possibilities for the profession. In 2019, the Catherine Worthingham Fellows identified five important themes that the profession must confront to set the stage for continued success in the profession’s second century. In this session, Catherine Worthingham Fellows will use short, Ignite-style presentations to address two of these themes: economic survivability and physical therapists as autonomous practitioners: How does our education system evolve so that graduates receive a meaningful return on investment while driving the increased quality of PT services, including ensuring that graduates are prepared for practicing autonomously in a high-performing health care systems?

Sessions Providing CEUs

CEUs are provided in the APTA Learning Center to those who successfully complete posttest assessments. Restrictions apply.

Addressing the Opioid Problem With Physical Therapy: Advocacy, Education, and Training
Brendon Larsen, PTA; Norman Johnson, PT, DPT, DEd; Rebecca Stevens, PTA, LMT, MA

 

Opioid literacy in physical therapy education and practice is paramount, and complements APTA’s Mission Statement: "Building a community that advances the profession of physical therapy to improve the health of society." Supporting patient health and wellness efforts is the APTA Code of Ethics for the Physical Therapist Principle 8: "Physical therapists shall participate in efforts to meet the health needs of people locally, nationally, or globally," and APTA Standards of Ethical Conduct for the Physical Therapist Assistant Standard 8: "Physical therapist assistants shall participate in efforts to meet the health needs of people locally, nationally, or globally." The recently adopted APTA House of Delegates position RC 62-19: Naloxone Availability Where Physical Therapy Services Are Provided further supports the need for advocacy, education, and training.

A growing body of evidence suggests that PTs are at moderately high risk of burnout, compassion fatigue, and career dropout. These factors have been correlated with poor patient safety and outcomes, practitioner physical and mental health problems, and poor revenue and marketing outcomes. Fortunately, the evidence shows that these problems are lower in entrepreneurial PTs with strategic foundational business, marketing, and health coaching skills. However, many entrepreneurs lack the support, knowledge, and personal accountability to apply these foundational practices without sacrificing their lives, health, and finances to get there. This is a problem on a consumer level, as it affects patient care, outcomes, and safety. In this session, PTs will receive specialty training and coaching to establish fundamental personal branding and marketing skills so that they can work smarter but not harder, eliminate the tendency toward compassion fatigue and burnout, and meet their professional and business goals. They will learn practically applicable skills to incorporate coaching and wellness services within their lives and their practices. In doing so, attendees will learn to cultivate an environment of healing and sustainable practice not only for their patients, but also for themselves.

Formula for Community Inclusion = D3STAR: Drumming, Dogs, and Dance
Kimberly Castle, PT, MSPT, PhD; Susan Klappa, PT, MPT, PhD; SueAnn McCall, PT, DPT; Donald Walsh, PT, DPT, MS; Rachael Walton-Mouw, PT, DPT

 

Meaningful participation in communities is vital for all. Partnerships between communities and PTs are essential for improving human health. APTA’s Vision Statement calls us to transform society. How is it possible to engage in societal transformation when there is so much else to do? In this session, speakers will present a model of community engagement and empowerment, as well as strategies for success on many levels. Presenters will provide narratives of personal action taken by practicing PTs working in their home communities to create transformative changes by inviting and expanding collective community efforts that promote opportunities for participation in community activities. Speakers will highlight community-based strategies used to help organizations provide welcoming and inclusive programs and services for all. Attendees will leave the session with a personal plan or scaffold for social transformation within their physical therapist practice.

Hot Topics in Payment: Federal and Commercial Payer Updates
Alice Bell, PT, DPT; Kara Gainer, JD

 

Federal and commercial payer coverage policies are constantly changing and vary depending on the settings in which PTs and PTAs practice. This session will provide a year in review, with a focus on commercial and federal payer activity, as well as what to expect in the latter half of 2020, particularly in light of COVID-19. Speakers will present the latest developments related to Medicare, Medicaid, TRICARE, and commercial insurers’ payment and policy changes — including billing and coding updates and telehealth coverage and payment policies. In addition, speakers will highlight APTA partnerships and collaborative efforts with policymakers, provider and patient advocacy groups, and payers. Presenters also will discuss the potential long-term impact of COVID-19 and what’s next in benefit redesign efforts and innovative care delivery opportunities in the payment arena.

Implementing an Intensive Inpatient Rehab Locomotor Training Program Incorporating Robotics and Other Technology-Based Tools
Ning Cao, MD; Kelly Donahue, PT, DPT; Erika Harold, PT; Elizabeth Marcy, PT, DPT; Andrew Packel, PT

 

It's an exciting time in the world of locomotor training. Mounting evidence regarding the importance of intensity and dosage, coupled with continuous advances in technology, provide ever-increasing options. Yet clinicians are faced with many challenges when trying to determine the best strategies for locomotor training. What is the clinical reasoning process that occurs when a therapist considers how to approach locomotor training for a particular patient? How can this process be influenced and optimized? At a program level, what structures and processes can be put in place to best support therapists and incorporation of multiple locomotor training devices and strategies? How do we continue to maintain the safety of patients and therapists while maximizing intensity, dosage, and skill-building? This session will present the implementation of a structured locomotor program — using robotics and technology-based tools alongside traditional approaches — within an acute inpatient rehabilitation facility.

Integrative Pain Management
Ziya Altug, PT, DPT, MS

 

Clinicians need to be knowledgeable about integrative pain management for either direct use in the clinic or for establishing good rapport and a therapeutic alliance with the patient or client. This interactive presentation will provide clinicians with practical intervention strategies that may be used as an adjunct to standard practice or to establish safe and effective home programs for issues related to acute and chronic pain. Attendees will learn about meditation, mindfulness, self-hypnosis, yoga, Pilates, tai chi, qigong, the Feldenkrais method, and the Alexander technique through evidence-based research and self-guided interactive experiences.

In today's busy clinical environment, it is crucial that clinicians recognize features of the history and physical examination that can influence decisions regarding diagnosis and referral to other members of the interprofessional health care team. Using the back region as a framework, the speakers will review musculoskeletal differential diagnosis and highlight how and when medical screening can be incorporated into the examination —especially when there is no conclusive physical therapy diagnosis. Due to the complexity of the back region, it is important that the therapist perform a thorough history and physical examination —not only to differentially diagnose the musculoskeletal condition that may be present, but also to identify and interpret signs and symptoms of peripheral nociceptive, peripheral neurogenic/neuropathic, and autonomic referral patterns that can mimic musculoskeletal dysfunction. Presenters will highlight red and yellow signs, and symptoms that require more-intensive screening and possible referral to another health care professional. This session will include real-life case examples to emphasize how visceral structures can refer symptoms to the back region, concluding with an interactive problem-solving session to underscore the importance of these concepts.

Managing Patients with Post-Intensive Care Syndrome, Including COVID-19 ICU Survivors
Alan Lee, PT, DPT, PhD; Patricia Ohtake, PT, PhD; James Smith, PT, DPT, MA; Alecia Thiele, PT, DPT, ATC, MEd; Hallie Zeleznik, PT, DPT

 

Historically, each year more than 4 million adults in the United States survive intensive care unit services, with 80% experiencing post-intensive care syndrome, or PICS. The COVID-19 pandemic has amplified these numbers, and that has highlighted the value that rehabilitation provides for these patients. This session will provide information about PICS, including an overview and strategies for examination and intervention. These strategies will be illustrated with a case presentation. Participants will bring back to their communities new approaches for serving this population of patients, and for advocating these services to their colleagues, using an interprofessional approach to ensure optimal patient outcomes.

Morbidity and Mortality Conference: Learning From Early-Career Professionals
Steven Ambler, PT, DPT, MPH, PhD; Jamie Dyson, PT, DPT; Constanza Aranda Garcia, PT, DPT, MSPH

 

All of us have completed a physical therapy visit and said to ourselves, “That could have gone better.” There is opportunity to learn from these encounters. Evidence shows the success of the morbidity and mortality (M and M) conference in other health care fields in improving quality and safety. This session will use both lecture and case studies to demonstrate how unexpected or unintended outcomes can be used to improve safety and quality through discussion. An M and M culture fosters an open and expansive mindset, and is imperative to instill in our early-career professional practitioners. Case presentations will include a description of a case in which patient outcomes were not as expected, followed by discussion of how the outcome occurred, was addressed, and could be prevented in the future. Cases will be presented by early-career professionals who will discuss their unique experiences implementing these practices.

Movement Screening Tests for Athletes: Tools for Effective Clinical Practice
Nicole Chimera, PhD; Monica Lininger, PhD, ATC; Craig Smith, PT, DPT; Meghan Warren, PT, PhD

 

Movement screening tests have been promoted for various uses in the last decade, including primary and secondary injury prevention. Clinically, these tests can help with return-to-play decisions and understanding injury risk in active populations. Evidence for identifying athletes at increased injury risk is conflicting overall, but some tests offer more compelling evidence. Having a strong evidence base for the adoption of specific movement screening tests can help clinicians make the most appropriate choice with patients, especially in a busy clinical environment. This session’s speakers have evaluated the association of several movement screening tests with injury in collegiate student-athletes and will provide evidence for specific movement screening tests — with attention to those that are field-expedient, inexpensive, and clinic-ready. At the end of this session, clinicians will have a clear understanding of movement screening tests and the evidence behind those best incorporated immediately into injury-prevention programs.

Movement System Musculoskeletal Diagnoses of Lumbar Spine and Shoulder
Paula Ludewig, PT, PhD, FAPTA; Shirley Sahrmann, PT, PhD, FAPTA

 

The movement system is the identity of physical therapy and the integration of body systems that generate and maintain movement at all levels of bodily function. Responsibility for a body system implies an enhanced role for the physical therapist. Traditionally, a PT provided treatment based on another health professional’s identification of the patient’s condition. Treatment was primarily for symptoms, with muscle weakness considered to one of them. Treatment was based on the physician’s diagnosis of the pathoanatomical problem. Recognition of the PT as a movement system expert clearly conveys a change in responsibilities. Those responsibilities include diagnosis of pathokinesiologic or kinesiopathologic conditions and development of treatment programs based on movement-impairment correction. Correction of the movement impairment addresses the cause of the problem rather than its symptoms or consequences. The APTA Board of Directors endorsed the criteria to develop diagnostic classification systems that recognize movement-related terms. A movement-related label is consistent with addressing the cause of the problem. Presenters will describe movement system kinesiopathologic diagnoses of the lumbar spine and the shoulder, the systematic exam used to make the diagnoses, identification of contributing factors, and how this guides treatment.

Movement System Neuromuscular Diagnoses
Patricia McGee, PT, DPT; Patricia Scheets, PT, DPT, MHS; Shirley Sahrmann, PT, PhD, FAPTA

 

The movement system is the identity of physical therapy and the integration of body systems that generate and maintain movement at all levels of bodily function. As a movement expert, the emphasis of physical therapist practice should be on recognition and classification of movement impairments to be used as movement system diagnoses. The APTA Board of Directors endorsed the criteria to develop diagnostic labels using recognized movement-related terms. Patients with neuromuscular disorders have pathokinesiologic problems in which a lesion in a component system has resulted in movement impairments, primarily in neuromuscular control. Classification of the characteristics of neuromuscular impairments is the basis of diagnoses that should guide treatment. Making a diagnosis also requires a systematic examination, with criteria for the presence and severity of the impairments for classification. Combining the pathokinesiologic movement system diagnosis and the diagnosis of the system should provide information about prognosis. Presenters will describe movement system pathokinesiologic diagnoses of adult and pediatric patients with neuromuscular impairments, the systematic exam used to make the diagnoses, and the criteria for assessing the movement impairments.

Our PT Degrees Did Not Include CEO
Brian Gallagher, PT

 

The purpose of this session is to change the perspective from “a PT who happens to be a private practice owner” to “a practice owner/CEO who happens to be a PT.” The role of CEO is not being taught in DPT schools, and yet many of us find ourselves in that role as practice owner. These skills need to be developed and perfected — much like patient care skills were initially, through education, affiliation, and, ultimately, real-life experience. We may come out of school knowing how to document and treat our patients, but we all too often are ill-equipped to effectively handle personnel management, marketing, branding, social media, company structure, systems of operations, recruiting, billing, policies, and planning. Attendees will learn how to stop managing problem to problem and instead be effective CEOs who can live the life of a private practice owner that they’ve always envisioned. In this session, the speaker will break down the components of being an effective CEO and will outline how best to apply this information to day-to-day practice.

In this session, the speakers will examine the implementation, lessons learned, and future directions of a PT-led postacute telehealth treatment and care navigation program for arthroplasty patients, with special considerations to how the COVID-19 pandemic has impacted telehealth rehabilitation. In this hospital electronic medical record-integrated program, more than 200 patients to date have participated in telehealth physical therapy in lieu of traditional home-based therapy following hip or knee arthroplasty. These patients were enrolled in Medicare’s Comprehensive Care for Joint Replacement bundled payment arrangement and used existing technology in their home to communicate with the clinical team for care. Discussion will include the value-based care model, choosing appropriate patients, evidence of benefits and limitations on patient outcomes and costs, and the impact of COVID-19 on, and future directions of, education, clinical practice, and research.

PTA Leadership Opportunities
Brendon Larsen, PTA; James Pacini, PTA, MEd; Rebecca Stevens, PTA, LMT, MA; Samantha Stryke, PTA

 

PTAs have been active members of the physical therapy profession for 50 years. In that time, their role has increased from passive to active. However, many PTs and PTAs are unaware of a number of opportunities for PTAs in clinical and nonclinical settings. Thus, many PTAs have missed chances to serve the profession. This lack of awareness has perpetuated the myth that PTAs are unable to serve the profession through leadership and advance their careers. Sections and chapters have asked, “Why aren’t PTAs more involved?” This session will address this concern and educate both PTs and PTAs on opportunities rather than myths of how PTAs can be active and optimally productive members of APTA and the profession.

The Role of the PT and PTA in Disaster Management
Heidi Kosakowski, PT, DPT; Richard Woolf, PT, DPT

 

PTs and PTAs have important roles to play, nationally and internationally, in disaster management. APTA will provide an update on its resources to help guide PTs and PTAs interested in participating in disaster management — including planning activities, preparation to engage in immediate and long-term disaster response efforts, and understanding of associated ethical and regulatory issues when crossing state lines or traveling internationally. Resources have been updated to reflect the current health pandemic and emphasize that many PTs and PTAs are currently in position to advocate for the role of the PT/PTA in disaster management, although that will not be the focus of the presentation.

Treatment of knee osteoarthritis can be a long process and involve multiple caregivers. Patients often are stuck in the middle, communicating information to multiple providers. Many times, care is not coordinated and patients do not receive all the treatments that may benefit them. The speakers will describe coordinated care for patients with knee OA. In their office, PTs are involved at the patient’s first visit with the orthopedic surgeon, often starting therapy that day. Many times, patients can avoid a total knee arthroplasty with proper rehabilitation. If not, the PT will coordinate care with the orthopedic surgeon to move forward with a TKA. The PT will cover preoperative education and postoperative care. This system has resulted in shorter hospital stays, fewer home care and rehabilitation visits, reduced costs, and better outcomes. Coordination of care makes this process possible and provides superior results.

PTs are seeing more people in persistent pain than ever before. Whether their symptoms are localized to one region of the body or span multiple regions, clinical reasoning is critical to assessing this patient population. Speakers will discuss how formulating a hypothesis based on the patient's story and testing that through an objective exam is the key to long-term change. Through real-life case studies of everything from assessment to treatment, presenters will discuss how investigating certain movement patterns was key to recovery. With this full-body approach, training the “driver” and not the symptom provides clinicians with more options for changing the patient’s movement strategy. The speakers will explore how one body region can greatly affect symptoms in another region. Attendees will learn to employ a clinical reasoning approach that highlights the patient’s meaningful experience, and will strengthen their ability to quickly home in on the real cause of the problem.

Collection and utilization of outcomes data is becoming more commonplace as payers, such as the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, require them for justification and assessment of treatment interventions. In addition to compliance, outcomes measures can provide valuable information about the quality of care provided to patients. Computer adaptive testing (CAT) tools, such as Focus On Therapeutic Outcomes’ patient-reported outcome measure, offer providers easy data collection and access to quality data. Utilization of data can prove far more beneficial than strict use for reimbursement and compliance. The speakers will review various uses of outcomes data to drive overall improvements in clinical practice, and will highlight the benefits of using outcome tools for patient care, marketing, recruitment, and research. The presenters will share examples of developing quality initiatives within the private practice setting and using outcomes data as a guide and indicator of success.

What Would You Do? Injury Prevention and Return-to-Play Criteria in Sports Physical Therapy
Gary Calabrese, PT, DPT; Walter Jenkins, PT, ATC, DHS; Terry Malone, PT, ATC, EdD, FAPTA; Robert Manske, PT, DPT, MEd

 

This session will focus on prevention of injury and return-to-play criteria for common shoulder and knee pathology. The speakers will discuss the current evidence for prevention and return-to-play protocols following a knee or shoulder pathology. Participants will gain information pertinent to current sports physical therapist practice. Practice gaps to be addressed include critical-thinking skills used in decision-making and evidence-based interventions used in prevention and return to play following injury. Attendee discussion will be encouraged.

Yoga: An Integrative Approach to Successful Aging
Ginger Garner, PT, DPT; LaVerene Garner, PT, DPT; Doris Molina-Henry, PhD

 

The evolution of the role of the PTs toward lifestyle coaching is inevitable and necessary. Action should occur sooner rather than later to secure PTs’ place in the prevention and wellness sector as a practitioner of choice. Understanding the biological changes related to normal aging and the physiological implications of an integrative approach to intervention is critical. Altogether, this knowledge can help equip PTs with the tools necessary to be leaders in implementing integrative biopsychosocial health care for the older adult. Yoga as exercise alone is not necessarily therapeutic, beneficial, or safe. However, yoga as a philosophy covers almost every major category that is recognized by the National Center for Complementary and Integrative Medicine, making it optimally suited as a guiding model for successful aging. This session will provide participants with an understanding of how yoga can be utilized to address the complex needs of the aging population.

You Don't Know Jack...Until You Understand His Culture: A Journey Into Diversity Education
Anissa Davis, PT, DPT; Lee Ann Eagler, PT, DPT; Katherin Duong, SPT; Samson Robinson, III, SPT

 

Cultivating Unified Lives Through Understanding, Reflecting, and Educating, or CULTURE, is a student-driven organization established in spring 2019 by two University of Lynchburg DPT students. Optimal practice within physical therapy requires not only professional knowledge, but also empathy toward diverse patient populations. With additional diversity education and cultural encounters, PTs are more likely to provide and meet the health care needs of underrepresented populations. Creating a group similar to CULTURE in any health care setting supports APTA values and initiatives to improving cultural knowledge and understanding within health care. For academic programs, this group promotes recruitment and retention of minority students, enhances classroom discussions, challenges racial conflicts, and prepares all students, including nonminority students, to work more effectively with diverse patients. This presentation will give PTs and students strategies to develop similar groups, and to create opportunities for conversations that will help foster equitable care to underrepresented populations.